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Trust in a digital world: Webinar Recap

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We urge you to register to watch the full recording to see the responses, learn more and keep involved in the conversation on digital trust. Unfortunately, there was not enough time to answer everyone’s questions, but we will be answering them in the upcoming weeks.

Register and watch the full event

This was the digital version of our annual physical event which would usually be held at the House of Lords with our sponsor Lord Alec Broers, but due to the current situation with COVID-19, the event became a virtual webinar.

Despite these circumstances, we were joined by over 100 attendees eager to start the conversation on digital trust.

Professor Lord (Alec) Broers kicked off the event by welcoming the speakers and attendees. He noted that his event had been created to help parliamentarians to understand the modern world of communications and to liaise with experts from the IET.

With the absence of Danielle George, IET Deputy President, Simon Edwards, Director of Governance and External Engagement at the IET, set the tone of the event and established the importance of having this conversation.

‘Modern communications are already helping with the impact of COVID19 and the topic of trust in the digital world is even more important today, given our reliance on digital services.’

Simon Edwards, Director of Governance and External Engagement, IET

The webinar focused on 3 main areas; how we trust data, improving the supply chain and trust by design for the Internet of Things (IoT).

Chris Gill started by discussing the importance of establishing trust and defining the issues and dimensions of fake news. Traditional ways of accessing news such as newspapers, radios and television are no longer the preferred means of gaining information.

Chris Chambers joined him in highlighting how the governance of technology and innovation should be both trustworthy and trusted. To cope with the rise of fake news, information needs to be accurate and trusted, precise enough to give a clear picture and not fuel panic and needs to be actionable by the population. A high-level certification scheme could be put in place, but concerns would still exits regarding who could be trusted to manage the control over security without manipulating information.

Gavin Young then talked about improving supply chain trust through network infrastructure virtualisation. Virtualisation is changing how networks are built and is creating new supply chain opportunities. Consumers are already concerned about the security of their information held in the cloud and the with the recent increase in homeworking, the need to trust the performance, longevity and reliability of one’s broadband networks is crucial. Network infrastructure virtualisation offers a possible way forward – it’s future proof and gives a more resilient approach to building networks.

Sylvia Lu talked about trust by design for the Internet of Things (IoT). The IoT contributes to our society and economy significantly through connected retail, asset tracking, smart buildings, connected health, industrial monitoring and more. With that said, many of IoT products are built using low-cost hardware and installed in untrusted locations, increasing their vulnerability to cyber-attacks. To build a successful inclusive digital future, we need to build trust for IoT devices from the very beginning by design. She proposed a solution based on SIM card technology, one that already has our trust, and to extend this to IoT devices to deliver scalable trust based on cellular connectivity.

The webinar then opened the discussion to attendees and welcomed their questions. Some key questions included:

  • How has the network helped in the current emergency?
  • What happens if the trusted sources and personnel get their facts wrong?
  • How can private and public sector regulation keep up with the speed of innovation without hindering innovation and compromising trust?
  • What are the Covid-19 lessons we should learn for telecoms?
  • Will working virtually become the new norm in a digital world?

We urge you to watch the full recording to see the responses, learn more and keep involved in the conversation on digital trust. Unfortunately, there was not enough time to answer everyone’s questions, but we will be answering them in the upcoming weeks.