IET logo
 
IET
Decrease font size
Increase font size
Topic Title: Do you remember your first wage as a sparks
Topic Summary:
Created On: 11 February 2018 12:12 PM
Status: Read Only
Linear : Threading : Single : Branch
1 2 Next Last unread
Search Topic Search Topic
Topic Tools Topic Tools
View similar topics View similar topics
View topic in raw text format. Print this topic.
 11 February 2018 12:12 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



dustydazzler

Posts: 1674
Joined: 19 January 2016

My dad reckons he was on £2 a week as an apprentice electrician back in the early 60s (prior to that he was an apprentice tool maker)

Myself was £14,000 a year in 1997
 11 February 2018 12:29 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



sparkingchip

Posts: 10335
Joined: 18 January 2003

In 1971, aged fifteen, I got a job in a factory operating machines cutting parts for the internal PTO shafts in Massey Ferguson on piecework.

i took home a pay packet with over seventeen quid in cash for my first week, my mother said it was ridiculous paying a kid a man's wage, as many families had less to live on, my dad pointed out i was on piecework, and the rate was the rate.

It was very tempting not to go back to school, as I could have stayed in the factory.

Andy B.
 11 February 2018 12:47 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



Blencathra

Posts: 72
Joined: 07 November 2017

First year app £8 if my memory serves me well, £2 went on bus fares, £3 on board, the rest on high living
 11 February 2018 01:45 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



tomgunn

Posts: 3990
Joined: 25 May 2005

July 1967 - 5 days and took home, giving my mum money too, £7.00 and that included TE!!! Hahaha! Mind you... thats MORE than I get NOW!!!

-------------------------
Tom.... (The TERMINATOR).

handyTRADESMAN

Castle Builders
 11 February 2018 02:46 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



broadgage

Posts: 2533
Joined: 07 August 2007

Working in a local workshop that manufactured and repaired various electrical items, about 1976, £1 an hour plus time and a half on Saturday and double time on Sunday. With a little overtime I took home about £50 a week.
Beer was 20 to 25 pence a pint and cigarettes about 40 to 50 pence a pack, though I never smoked.
50 pence was still commonly referred to as "ten bob" and 5 pence coins still called "shillings"

The owner of the firm also owned a number of flats and a part of my work was to accompany him when emptying the gas and electricity meters of "ten bob coins" and collecting the rent. He had previously been robbed and thereafter always took an employee with him.

I re-wired a couple of the flats, some of the most basic installations that I have ever done.
Two way MEM splitter unit (government surplus) with a single 30 amp power circuit and a single 5 amp lighting circuit.
The larger flats had three circuits from a 3 phase switch fuse (government surplus) wired so as to give 3 single phase circuits, lights, power, and one other circuit used for either a cooker or a water heater.

Some of the tenants would call at the retail shop attached to the factory in order to pay the rent, it was my job to accept the money and issue a receipt in such cases.
 11 February 2018 03:26 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



potential

Posts: 1661
Joined: 01 February 2007

In 1966 I'd been working full-time at GEC Hirst research Centre for several years when I was asked to do paid domestic electrical work by a family friend.
His usual electrician had a serious illness and couldn't work.
It was simple stuff, it only took me a couple of hours.
On that Saturday afternoon I earned more than I was being paid for an entire week at GEC.
The friend, who was very pleased with my work, ran an estate agents and managed about 800 properties.
Many of the properties were run down and needed a lot of maintenance.
He asked me if I could do all the electrical work.
There would be a lot of it and it would be regular.
What would you have done?

On reflection I never really appreciated how good those days were at GEC.
It was a paternalistic employer that showed it cared for me in many ways.
The staff, who were much older than me for the most part, were some of the nicest people I have ever worked with.
If I had the choice again I would have stayed at GEC.
They were happy days.
 11 February 2018 04:13 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



tomgunn

Posts: 3990
Joined: 25 May 2005

Originally posted by: potential

In 1966 I'd been working full-time at GEC Hirst research Centre for several years when I was asked to do paid domestic electrical work by a family friend.

His usual electrician had a serious illness and couldn't work.

It was simple stuff, it only took me a couple of hours.

On that Saturday afternoon I earned more than I was being paid for an entire week at GEC.

The friend, who was very pleased with my work, ran an estate agents and managed about 800 properties.

Many of the properties were run down and needed a lot of maintenance.

He asked me if I could do all the electrical work.

There would be a lot of it and it would be regular.

What would you have done?



On reflection I never really appreciated how good those days were at GEC.

It was a paternalistic employer that showed it cared for me in many ways.

The staff, who were much older than me for the most part, were some of the nicest people I have ever worked with.

If I had the choice again I would have stayed at GEC.

They were happy days.




-------------------------
Tom.... (The TERMINATOR).

handyTRADESMAN

Castle Builders
 11 February 2018 05:40 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



sparkingchip

Posts: 10335
Joined: 18 January 2003

 11 February 2018 06:09 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



mikejumper

Posts: 2494
Joined: 14 December 2006

I've read that if wages had risen at the same rate as house prices the average wage now would be £87,720.
 12 February 2018 12:16 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



AncientMariner

Posts: 739
Joined: 14 December 2004

1965 £416 per annum as a Trainee Radio Technician with what was then the Ministry of Defence (Air) during 20 week full time course. By 1974 was on £2,100 per annum. Decided on a career change, 2 1/2 years at college then summer 1977 started in the Merchant Navy on around £5,500 per annum.

Clive

-------------------------
Clive S Carver GCGI IEng MIET MITP
 12 February 2018 02:47 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



kirchoffs

Posts: 231
Joined: 08 February 2010

I remember it well, 16/09/74 45 pence per hr,45 hr week
16 yr old long hair down to my shoulders.

First job was the local slaughterhouse,the pig hoist had broken down in the middle of killing, blood, p*** and s*** everywhere. The DOL starter was mounted on a high level RSJ, Jack said "i've just the job for you lad get your ***** up here "
For the next couple of hours i was holding the up /down contacts in with a pencil as required.No H&S in those days.
I later found out that all previous apprentices had jacked it in when they discovered the slaughterhouse was a regular customer.
I worked for the same firm till they went bust in 2015
£17.45 per hr 37 hr week.

Edited: 12 February 2018 at 04:41 AM by kirchoffs
 12 February 2018 06:40 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



eclipse

Posts: 173
Joined: 03 November 2006

1972, the grand sum of £5.65 , gave it all to my mum, bless her!!

-------------------------
Thanks

Alan.

Now what was that reg no?
 12 February 2018 09:33 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



potential

Posts: 1661
Joined: 01 February 2007

Originally posted by: kirchoffs

I remember it well, 16/09/74 45 pence per hr,45 hr week

16 yr old long hair down to my shoulders.



First job was the local slaughterhouse.................................

That was about 10 years after I started work.
8 guineas was my starting salary.
.
I had long hair too and didn't I pay for it!
It was common to be confronted by complete strangers in the street who were aggressive and violent because my long hair stirred something within them.
My 60s bright clothes did not help either.
I remember walking down one of the corridors at GEC and suddenly being grabbed and shaken by the lapels of my jacket by a senior engineer.
He was shouting at me about the colour of my shirt.
It was brown.
A couple of weeks later I wore a black shirt and received a similar reaction.
For older people at that time the war was not a distant memory.
You had it easy in the 70s.

I only worked in a slaughterhouse a couple of times.
It was owned and run by a couple of old school friends.
Apart from the filth and stench I was amazed to see blowflies walking around behind the equipment the size of boiled sweets.
They couldn't fly and they were a pale, almost translucent white in colour all over.
The last time I heard about those friends was about 40 years ago.
I met their mother in the street and she told me they had been caught hijacking a meat lorry in the West Country and were now serving time.
Its funny how we all turn out isn't it?
 12 February 2018 11:04 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



Zoomup

Posts: 3537
Joined: 20 February 2014

The Massey Ferguson tractors were very popular as they were versatile and reliable tractors that could utilize many implements. I drove some of these. They were the 135 and 165 models I believe. They were red in colour.

Z.
 12 February 2018 11:07 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



Zoomup

Posts: 3537
Joined: 20 February 2014

I had a big lift in wages in the late 70s when the electrical contractors that I worked for in Berkshire sent us up to London to do some weekend overtime work while the office staff were not there. I took home over a hundred pounds a week than after tax etc. I had never earned so much. But the job was short lived.

Z.
 12 February 2018 11:10 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



Zoomup

Posts: 3537
Joined: 20 February 2014

Originally posted by: kirchoffs

I remember it well, 16/09/74 45 pence per hr,45 hr week

16 yr old long hair down to my shoulders.



First job was the local slaughterhouse,the pig hoist had broken down in the middle of killing, blood, p*** and s*** everywhere. The DOL starter was mounted on a high level RSJ, Jack said "i've just the job for you lad get your ***** up here "

For the next couple of hours i was holding the up /down contacts in with a pencil as required.No H&S in those days.

I later found out that all previous apprentices had jacked it in when they discovered the slaughterhouse was a regular customer.

I worked for the same firm till they went bust in 2015

£17.45 per hr 37 hr week.


Was that a pencil with a conductive "carbon" graphite centre?

Z.
 12 February 2018 01:39 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



mikejumper

Posts: 2494
Joined: 14 December 2006

Originally posted by: Zoomup
The Massey Ferguson tractors were very popular as they were versatile and reliable tractors that could utilize many implements. I drove some of these. They were the 135 and 165 models I believe. They were red in colour.
Z.

Those old tractors look like Dinky toys compared to the massive things they drive around in now.

Am I right in thinking that the latest tractors aren't driven directly from the engine but via electric or hydraulic systems powered by the engine?
 12 February 2018 06:33 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



sparkingchip

Posts: 10335
Joined: 18 January 2003

Zoomup:

Correct PPE
 12 February 2018 07:14 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



Blencathra

Posts: 72
Joined: 07 November 2017

Originally posted by: Zoomup

Originally posted by: kirchoffs



I remember it well, 16/09/74 45 pence per hr,45 hr week



16 yr old long hair down to my shoulders.








First job was the local slaughterhouse,the pig hoist had broken down in the middle of killing, blood, p*** and s*** everywhere. The DOL starter was mounted on a high level RSJ, Jack said "i've just the job for you lad get your ***** up here "



For the next couple of hours i was holding the up /down contacts in with a pencil as required.No H&S in those days.



I later found out that all previous apprentices had jacked it in when they discovered the slaughterhouse was a regular customer.



I worked for the same firm till they went bust in 2015



£17.45 per hr 37 hr week.




Was that a pencil with a conductive "carbon" graphite centre?



Z.

I remember being sent up to a gantry crane and riding along ducking under girders looking at the brakes actuating while my journeyman operated the pendant
 12 February 2018 09:53 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



ebee

Posts: 6361
Joined: 02 December 2004

1971 £9 per week gross at 16 year old. 15 year olds were on £5 per week. That was for apprentices lasteing till 20years old then you got big money £35 per week . Gaffers got £40 wow.
My mates were on more for shop work but I would be quids in over them once I became time served.

40 hour week including one day at college then one evening 3 hours on top of that

In those days you could leave one job in the morning and find another employer in the afternoon, OK it might not be THE job you wanted but it kept you going until you found one you liked.

That was for us Norfs, I expect those Sarfs faired even better.

-------------------------
Regards,
Ebee (M I S P N)

Knotted cables cause Lumpy Lektrik
Statistics

New here?


See Also:



FuseTalk Standard Edition v3.2 - © 1999-2018 FuseTalk Inc. All rights reserved.

..