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Topic Title: Connecting 3 Wall Lights, 'daisy-chain' fashion
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Created On: 12 July 2018 02:04 PM
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 12 July 2018 05:46 PM
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chrispearson

Posts: 248
Joined: 15 February 2018

Originally posted by: dustydazzler

The ground screw is green because typically the ground grass is green [IMG][/IMG]


Right now my grass is green and yellow.

Back to the OP ... This seems to be a time-honoured technique even if it isn't, strictly, compliant.
 12 July 2018 06:28 PM
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mac72

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Joined: 26 March 2018

Ok, Thanks Dusty. I am not experienced at wiring so don't know wha'ts normal practice. Previously worked in electrical design but have limited practical experience (a few house rewires). This forum is great place for advice

Cheers!
 12 July 2018 06:28 PM
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mac72

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Ok, Thanks Dusty. I am not experienced at wiring so don't know wha'ts normal practice. Previously worked in electrical design but have limited practical experience (a few house rewires). This forum is great place for advice

Cheers!
 12 July 2018 06:31 PM
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mac72

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ok, thanks Chris. The wiring is inside my own house. I'd like to be filly compliant with the regs
 12 July 2018 06:40 PM
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Zoomup

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1.5mm2 for a few lights? Is this really necessary?

Z.
 12 July 2018 06:50 PM
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mac72

Posts: 30
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Not sure. The wiring was already in-situ. I was just replacing the three wall lights.
 12 July 2018 06:53 PM
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Zoomup

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I expect that if neatly and carefully made off, the connection will probably last a hundred years, just like the millions of similar connections that must exist here in the U.K. This has been standard practice since before Noah, although not strictly compliant with B.S. 7671 In fact some wall lights come with a ready made row of three choc block connectors inbuilt for connection to fixed wiring. Sometimes with a solid wall you do not wish to make a bigger hole than exists behind the old wall light so use the smallest connectors available to be able to fix them easily behind the back plate. As Mike said, you could consider the whole void as an enclosure. But if it is conductive backed plasterboard you may be concerned about livening the whole surface up internally and making screw heads live in case of a fault. I would not worry too much if you have insulated the joints well, but modern Chinese insulation tape does lose its stick rather quickly these days.

Z.
 12 July 2018 07:40 PM
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dustydazzler

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Agree zoom

A good old twist and tape joint is as old as time itself

I will even hold my hand up to deploying this method on more than one occasion
 12 July 2018 07:53 PM
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mac72

Posts: 30
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thanks,

It's normal plasterboard (hopefully that's not conductive!).

Thanks for the advice regarding modern insulation tape.

I'll ask an electrician to check my work. Lots to consider!!
 12 July 2018 07:53 PM
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mac72

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cheers
 12 July 2018 07:57 PM
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dustydazzler

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You really don't need an electrician to check a wall light

Unless there is something really odd like flickering bulb or tripping rcd
 12 July 2018 08:03 PM
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mac72

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ok cheers

Lights are on 6A MCB.....not on RCD.....is this a problem?
 12 July 2018 08:07 PM
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dustydazzler

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Originally posted by: mac72

ok cheers



Lights are on 6A MCB.....not on RCD.....is this a problem?


Not a problem For the last 200 years
 12 July 2018 08:17 PM
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mac72

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OK thanks
 12 July 2018 08:44 PM
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Zoomup

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Originally posted by: dustydazzler

Agree zoom



A good old twist and tape joint is as old as time itself



I will even hold my hand up to deploying this method on more than one occasion


I was not advocating just a twist and tape joint Dusty. I was referring to chock block connectors with fire retardant P.V.C. tape. If worried about fire then use porcelain chock blocks. But with a small load like a wall light or three any heating effect will be small. If it was me I would bash a BIG hole in the wall and use a brown urea circular junction box to fully comply. They just do not burn, and they are fully insulated. Fit and forget.

Z.
 12 July 2018 08:50 PM
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Zoomup

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http://www.homebase.co.uk/our-...ockets/junction-boxes

A 5 Amp round junction box might be hidden behind the lights with some luck, illustrated at the top of the linked image in the centre.

Z.
 12 July 2018 08:54 PM
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dustydazzler

Posts: 2258
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Originally posted by: Zoomup

Originally posted by: dustydazzler



Agree zoom







A good old twist and tape joint is as old as time itself







I will even hold my hand up to deploying this method on more than one occasion[IMG][/IMG]




I was not advocating just a twist and tape joint Dusty. I was referring to chock block connectors with fire retardant P.V.C. tape. If worried about fire then use porcelain chock blocks. But with a small load like a wall light or three any heating effect will be small. If it was me I would bash a BIG hole in the wall and use a brown urea circular junction box to fully comply. They just do not burn, and they are fully insulated. Fit and forget.



Z.



Sorry

When I say 'twist and tape' I do mean taped up connector block joint

Not just a twisted up cable , now that is proper badgers work
 12 July 2018 09:06 PM
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Zoomup

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Yes Dusty, I thought that you did, but I had to clarify in case I get burned at the stake by the Regs' police.

Z.
 13 July 2018 09:38 AM
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vstrom1000

Posts: 48
Joined: 09 July 2018

I didn't think of this yesterday, as I was dealing with a metal bath tub. If the property is in Scotland, as per LABSS, shown here for domestic buildings:
http:// www.gov.scot/Resource/0043/00431055.pdf
you should call the Building Standards Dept. of your local council to determine whether you need a building warrant. For the most part, they are very helpful, just explain what you've done, and they'll advise you.
 13 July 2018 10:51 AM
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WiredScience

Posts: 340
Joined: 25 January 2012

Most wall lights have a back plate that will cover a round or square dry lining box. This will then enclose the connections, with the backplate completing the "junction box".
IET » Wiring and the regulations » Connecting 3 Wall Lights, 'daisy-chain' fashion

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