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Topic Title: Connecting 3 Wall Lights, 'daisy-chain' fashion
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Created On: 12 July 2018 02:04 PM
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 12 July 2018 02:04 PM
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mac72

Posts: 31
Joined: 26 March 2018

Hi,

I have recently wired 3 wall lights together using plastic terminal strips to join the 1.5mm twin /earth cable to each light. Each terminal strip junction was then insulated with electrical tape and then popped through a hole in the plaster board, where they lie out of reach. Each junction can be accessed again by pulling the cable back through the hole in the plasterboard.

Is this acceptable electrical wiring practice?, i.e. joining cables with terminal strips then insulating them with tape and locating the joins behind plasterboard?

I would have used choc boxes to house the terminal strips but the hole in the plasterboard is too narrow to pope them through.

Is there a better way of doing this?

I appreciate any help.

Thanks
Mac
 12 July 2018 02:30 PM
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dustydazzler

Posts: 2544
Joined: 19 January 2016

Tape joints are very very common on sites , but strictly speaking are a bit badger as the tape can unravel over time.
A choc box would be better or maybe a wago box.
But if space is very very tight , I personally don't have an issue with a neat taped joint
 12 July 2018 02:41 PM
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mapj1

Posts: 11082
Joined: 22 July 2004

If I understand you, singles of choc bloc floating about in a void behind plaster board is not especially beautiful and not really to current standards , unless you can argue that the space behind the plasterboard is actually the enclosure - and that depends rather on what is on the other side.
Realistically it is not that uncommon to find choc block in ceilings, and reasonably unlikely to cause a problem unless the terminal block is accessible or will suffer condensation.
Special very slim joints (and maintenance free)are available for posting into holes quickwire comes to mind but there are others, and I have no commercial connection with that company.

-------------------------
regards Mike
 12 July 2018 02:52 PM
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broadgage

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Joined: 07 August 2007

Rather poor practice IMHO but most unlikely to be dangerous unless under very rare circumstances.

Would I do it like that for a paying customer ? No I would not
Would I do it like that in my own home ? Yes I might.
 12 July 2018 02:53 PM
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dustydazzler

Posts: 2544
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Alternative to twist and tape joints


https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=WteSUJMxUYs
 12 July 2018 03:06 PM
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mac72

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Joined: 26 March 2018

Thanks. Looks a good idea. Much appreciated
 12 July 2018 03:07 PM
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mac72

Posts: 31
Joined: 26 March 2018

Thanks for sharing your experience. Much appreciated.
 12 July 2018 03:09 PM
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mac72

Posts: 31
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thanks Mike. I will check out these connectors. Cheers
 12 July 2018 03:09 PM
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deleted_1_vstrom1000

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[text in this post removed]

Edited: 25 July 2018 at 10:07 AM by IET Moderator
 12 July 2018 03:11 PM
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mac72

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thanks for advice
 12 July 2018 03:24 PM
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mac72

Posts: 31
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Thanks. One other reply suggested using slim Quickwire junction boxes. I think this may be a good idea.

But, from what you said about Scottish Building Regs, does this mean I cannot pop into a void of a plasterboard partition? The stud partition is between living room and hall and is fire rated for 1/2 hour.
 12 July 2018 03:28 PM
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deleted_1_vstrom1000

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[text in this post removed]

Edited: 25 July 2018 at 10:08 AM by IET Moderator
 12 July 2018 03:48 PM
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mac72

Posts: 31
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Thanks very much. I will have a look at Table 2.

The stud partition is internal (all within the dwellinghouse). Does that mean I can I can run wires inside wall?

Thanks
 12 July 2018 04:00 PM
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mac72

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From my understanding of Table 2 in Best Practice Guide 5, by Electrical Safety First, my stud partition needs to be 1 hour fire rated (I think it is). It is an internal stud partition separating the exclusive hall and living-room. It is on the first floor of a block of flats (Top floor is below 18m).
 12 July 2018 04:24 PM
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dustydazzler

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Something like dis

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Zjp06jym42o
 12 July 2018 04:58 PM
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mac72

Posts: 31
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Thanks Dusty. Good video. The woman used wire connecting twister knuts. By the sounds of previous comments above I think the connections would still need to be enclosed somehow? Maybe regs are different in America?
 12 July 2018 05:02 PM
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dustydazzler

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The ground screw is green because typically the ground grass is green

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Yg01E_unsAM
 12 July 2018 05:19 PM
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mac72

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thanks
 12 July 2018 05:30 PM
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dustydazzler

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Sorry

I have gone off on a bit of a tangent

But it's interesting how the Americans / Canadian sink a round plate box into the stud wall prior to fitting the light

Gives you somewhere to neatly tuck all those natty wires away as unposed to just 'shoving back into the hole in the wall'
 12 July 2018 05:33 PM
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dustydazzler

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Probably seen over 1000 twist and tape joints in U.K. homes , some in new builds built just last year

Old habits die hard I guess
Statistics

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