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Topic Title: New Girl in the Forum
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Created On: 08 November 2017 03:38 PM
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 08 November 2017 03:38 PM
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APRiley

Posts: 1
Joined: 23 August 2016

Hi all.

Been a member for about a year now so I thought it was time to venture into the forums.

I began my electrical (maintenance) career back in the late 70's with 17 years on the tools. moving into teaching/training in the mid 90's. Held positions at varying levels within electrical organisations rising to Director of Training before easing off a little.

Currently assessing installation apprentices for a local college.

keep safe now peeps
Alison
 08 November 2017 04:56 PM
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mapj1

Posts: 9811
Joined: 22 July 2004

Welcome, if you have been lurking you will realise its a bit anarchic on here at times, don't be put off by that, just chip in as you see fit or start new thread if you have some topic for discussion

-------------------------
regards Mike
 08 November 2017 09:38 PM
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leckie

Posts: 4549
Joined: 21 November 2008

Ah ha, I looked at doing that job Alison (the assessing) basically because I decided that I couldn't do the hard graft anymore - that was a mental step, admitting you cannot physically do the job anymore! However I changed my mind and am doing other stuff. Anyway, welcome.
 09 November 2017 04:15 PM
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kellyselectric

Posts: 204
Joined: 22 July 2016

Hi Alison welcome to our forum its nice to have another girl here! Regards Kelly
 09 November 2017 04:26 PM
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dustydazzler

Posts: 1599
Joined: 19 January 2016

Welcome.
It's a shame there aren't more female electricians.
I have only ever met one in 25 years of being in and around the bizz
 09 November 2017 10:47 PM
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aligarjon

Posts: 3883
Joined: 09 September 2005

I don't think i have met any. The nearest i got was a lady alarm fitter. I vaguely remember a plumber also.


Gary

-------------------------
Specialised Subject. The Bleedin Obvious. John Cleese
 10 November 2017 07:57 AM
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dustydazzler

Posts: 1599
Joined: 19 January 2016

I wonder what is putting off women taking up the trades. I guess the physical nature of the job as a plumber electrician carpenter is slightly off putting and the fact something like 95% of sites are male dominated probably doesn't help either.
But I genuinely feel it's a shame that we don't have more of an even split on site.
Just one of the trades oddities I guess
 10 November 2017 11:00 PM
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MHRestorations

Posts: 41
Joined: 22 October 2017

it could be the sexist attitude that prevails on many sites (I know, beating a dead horse etc). But it still depresses me to hear men talk on sites in a way that bernard manning would find offensive.

But on a more cheerful note, welcome on the occasion of your de-lurk
 12 November 2017 11:45 AM
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Zs

Posts: 3842
Joined: 20 July 2006

From Personal Experience, I think you guys do yourselves a dis -service. I have only ever encountered a caring attitude on site. A far cry from what goes on in offices.

On a site, we need to get the job done. If there is any 'ism' Then I think it is capabilityism, which , IMHO has a fine part to play. We recognise each others' limitations.

Zs
 12 November 2017 02:41 PM
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mikejumper

Posts: 2475
Joined: 14 December 2006

Originally posted by: dustydazzler
I wonder what is putting off women taking up the trades.

It may just be that technical occupations that are less physically arduous and better paid are more appealing, such as architecture, civil engineering and the many branches of chemistry.

I wonder also whether from an early age there is an element of gender stereotyping on the part of parents and schools, unintentional or otherwise, that tends to steer boys more towards technical occupations than girls.

It's not that long ago that girls were not offered the opportunity to do woodwork or metalwork in schools, domestic science (learning to cook) was all that was offered. No wonder the engineering environment is male dominated.
 12 November 2017 03:01 PM
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geoffsd

Posts: 1800
Joined: 15 June 2010

You all do realise that, purely on a numerical basis, if women did 50% of traditionally male jobs, then 50% of traditionally female jobs would have to be done by men.

How many of you would want to do those jobs and - would you be allowed to?

Idealism is a great idea.
 12 November 2017 03:49 PM
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mapj1

Posts: 9811
Joined: 22 July 2004

well there are plenty of chaps out there who would benefit from learning to cook and keep a house, but indeed, I don't hear the shouts of protest from those who wish to be primary school teachers or similar mostly female professional.
Don't get me wrong, equality of opportunity is correct and to be lauded.
But we must realise that there may may not be an equality of desire to do, and at the risk of prodding the ants nest, in some key areas an equality of ability - I really don't think testosterone is very compatible to small child minding for example, (though it may be better when they reach an age that needs shouting at.. I help lead scouts and seem to spend a lot of time shouting, at both sexes...)
And there is a very good reason that most of the prison population is male, and it is not police bias.

-------------------------
regards Mike
 12 November 2017 06:12 PM
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ebee

Posts: 6356
Joined: 02 December 2004

At 60 I learned how to iron a shirt.

Progress

Welcome Alison

-------------------------
Regards,
Ebee (M I S P N)

Knotted cables cause Lumpy Lektrik
 12 November 2017 07:04 PM
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Fm

Posts: 1783
Joined: 24 August 2011

Stem is pushed a lot more in school, I have 2 in primary school so see this first hand, couldn't care what sex you are, as long as you can do the job you are employed to do
 12 November 2017 07:16 PM
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Nospark

Posts: 197
Joined: 05 October 2013

"But we must realise that there may may not be an equality of desire to do"

Due to gender bias during childhood I think.
 22 November 2017 09:00 PM
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Zs

Posts: 3842
Joined: 20 July 2006

Possibly. However, having had the perfect childhood and having now an outside of work environment filled with all the signs of being female ( lotions, potions, perfume, gym memberships, dancing lessons etc.) I'm not sure that blaming the parents is appropriate. I certainly would not blame mine for my getting myself into a mess.

I must be guarded but I can tell you this much of an ongoing case...16 weeks ago I sat down at a desk ready for the last 16 or so years' of my working life and ready to come off the tools for good and have my weekends off. On day 2 I knew that I had to keep a diary. Last week 24 pages of it went to a union rep.

'Smart women like smart men more than smart men like smart women'.

All a smart woman really needs to know is that she can do it and that she is going to find out who her friends are if the going ever gets tough. Same as men then? I see you go through this kind of thing too.

I am about to be transferred to a different area, promoted and given a pay rise, rather than resign.

Just teach your daughter to be savvy and to stand up for herself on the rare occasion that she needs to. She'll be fine and she will love being an engineer.

Zs
 22 November 2017 10:40 PM
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John Peckham

Posts: 8811
Joined: 23 April 2005

Alison

You don't want to do some teaching on Thursday in Essex do you.? I teach evenings at the college and one of the full timers has gone of with stress due to domestic crisis ( ex. Royal Marine and tough as old boots normally). My Head of Department has pleaded with me to come in on Thursday but I have other commitments and told him I am leaving next April after one last Level 4 design course, he is in denial at the moment.

I feel sorry for my full time colleagues at college as they do a great job in very difficult circumstances and no body loves them! I think in the last 8 or so years they have had only a single 1 % pay rise so they are on s**t money and no sign of things getting better. They are all demoralized and thinking of chucking the towel in and getting another job or working for themselves.

So I probably have not sold the teaching job to you then Alison?

-------------------------
John Peckham

http://www.astutetechnicalservices.co.uk/
 23 November 2017 07:05 AM
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davezawadi

Posts: 3998
Joined: 26 June 2002

I'm sorry to hear of your problems Zs. In my experience such things are a response to seeing someone who is more capable than the men, who then take up a stupid response of many kinds. I have been working on some drama where there is someone similar to these men, he is aggressive and is about to discover that working as part of a team is important, because his lighting is pretty poor and the audience will notice! A poor review will serve him right, but you can bet that the blame game will follow close on it's heels. The best results for everyone come from working together to make the most of the collective skills, it really doesn't matter who does what, but insecure people think that they know better.
Good luck with the change.

-------------------------
David
BSc CEng MIET
david@ZawadiSoundAndLighting.co.uk
 23 November 2017 10:01 AM
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Lisamiles

Posts: 38
Joined: 30 May 2003

Originally posted by: mikejumper

Originally posted by: dustydazzler

I wonder what is putting off women taking up the trades.


It may just be that technical occupations that are less physically arduous and better paid are more appealing, such as architecture, civil engineering and the many branches of chemistry.



I wonder also whether from an early age there is an element of gender stereotyping on the part of parents and schools, unintentional or otherwise, that tends to steer boys more towards technical occupations than girls.



It's not that long ago that girls were not offered the opportunity to do woodwork or metalwork in schools, domestic science (learning to cook) was all that was offered. No wonder the engineering environment is male dominated.



Being a proud Auntie to two nieces I've been witnessing 'unintentional' stereotyping from afar. You only seem to be able to buy toddlers clothing for girls in 'pink' and why oh why have a pink version of a toy just for girls?

For one of my nieces birthdays I bought her a remote control Lamborghini... but another relative bought her a pram and a baby doll because obviously little girls should be 'trained' to look after babies when they're still babies themselves...

-------------------------
Lisa

Online Community Manager - Engineering Communities
 23 November 2017 10:15 AM
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OMS

Posts: 22447
Joined: 23 March 2004

Originally posted by: Lisamiles


For one of my nieces birthdays I bought her a remote control Lamborghini... but another relative bought her a pram and a baby doll because obviously little girls should be 'trained' to look after babies when they're still babies themselves...


Which does she prefer playing with Lisa - genuine question

At my current office location, after taking on two 16 year old girls as graduate apprentices and having had two young women "year in industry" placements with me for the last 12 months coupled with a further two female grads appointed to full time engineering posts I'm pretty certain that a reasonable % of them might have had a doll or two as kids - as I'm sure more than a few of the male cohort had action men or toy guns

I would point out that we do select the best candidate - we don't operate any kind of quota - although our Women in Engineering group is a pretty active support network across the business

Nature or Nurture is certainly part of a debate, but putting little girls in pink rompers isn't going to stop them becoming engineers for sure

Regards

OMS

-------------------------
Let the wind blow you, across a big floor.
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