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Mike Carr digital TV Compression IET Presidential Lecture

Lecture

Image of three blue heads in profile on grey background

Screening of the IET Presidential Address.

Date and Time

11 October 2018 - 18:00-21:00

Location

Exeter, United Kingdom - icon_popup  (See map)

Organiser

Organised by the UK - SW:Devon&Cornwall local network.


About this event

Access to hundreds of high resolution live TV channels and millions of YouTube videos is now the norm. Do you ever hit ‘pause’ to wonder how this came about?

What we now take for granted has actually developed over the last 50 years. Whilst the improvements in digital transmission speeds and storage have helped considerably, a fundamental enabler to the success of the modern video empowered world is “Digital Video Compression”.

This Presidential address will overview the highlights and evolution of video compression engineering, starting with the relative simple schemes of the late 1970’s through to latest sophisticated techniques in common use today.

Programme

18:00 Refreshments
18:30 Lecture

Continuing Professional Development

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This event can contribute towards your Continuing Professional Development (CPD) as part of the IET's CPD monitoring scheme.

Registration information

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Lecture - Thu 11 October 2018 at 18:30

This Presidential address will overview the highlights and evolution of video compression engineering, starting with the relative simple schemes of the late 1970’s through to latest sophisticated techniques in common use today.