Shop cart

Welcome

Modelling control systems using IEC 61499. 2nd Edition

book image

IET Digital Library

This title is available electronically through the IET Digital Library

  • Author:

  • Year: 2014

  • Format: Hardback

  • Product Code: PBCE0950

  • ISBN: 978-1-84919-760-1

  • Pagination: 248pp

  • Stock Status: In stock

£55.25 Member price

£85.00 Full price


Buy Now

Description

IEC 61499 is a standard for modelling distributed control systems for use in factory automation. This standard is already having an impact on the design and implementation of industrial control systems that involve the integration of programmable logic controllers, intelligent devices and sensors.

Modelling control systems using IEC 61499. 2nd Edition has been significantly updated to incorporate the changes introduced in the two revisions of the standard since 2001 and to reflect lessons learned from the author’s teaching of IEC 61499 in the last ten years. Therefore this book provides a through yet concise introduction to the main concepts and models defined in the IEC 61499 standard for modelling distributed control systems for use in factory automation.

Topics covered include;

  • defining function blocks
  • structuring applications
  • service interface function blocks
  • event function blocks
  • examples of industrial applications.

About the Authors

Alois Zoitl leads the Industrial Automations research group at the research institute fortiss in Munich, Germany and has conducted several research projects on distributed adaptive automation systems and has given lectures and consulted on IEC 61499 for more than ten years.
Robert Lewis is an engineering safety consultant for Atkins with experience in Safety Case development and authoring, Hazard analysis, HAZOP workshops, FMECA, systems assurance, safety assessment and requirements management. He was formerly a UK expert on two IEC working groups defining new standards for industrial control software, covering distributed control systems (IEC 61499) and PLC software (IEC 61131).

Book readership

Modelling control systems using IEC 61499. 2nd Edition is essential reading for academic and research-led control and process engineers and students working in research fields that require complex control systems using networked based distributed control. This book will also be of interest to researchers in robotics and safety systems.

Book contents

1 Introduction 1
1.1 IEC 61499 function block standard 5
1.2 Development of function block concept beyond IEC 61131-3 8
1.2.1 Global variables 10
1.2.2 Communications function blocks 11
1.3 Development of IEC 61499 12
1.4 Why use function blocks 14
1.5 System design views 16
1.5.1 Logical view 17
1.5.2 Process view 17
1.5.3 Development view 18
1.5.4 Physical view 18
1.5.5 Scenarios 18
1.6 The future beyond IEC 61499 19

2 IEC 61499 models and concepts 21
2.1 Function block model 22
2.1.1 General characteristics 22
2.1.2 Execution model for function blocks 24
2.1.3 Function block types 27
2.2 Application model 28
2.3 System model 29
2.3.1 Overall system structure 29
2.3.2 Device model 30
2.3.3 Resource model 30
2.4 Distribution model 32
2.4.1 Mapping of applications 32
2.4.2 Platform specific configurations 34
2.5 Management model 34
2.5.1 Management applications 36
2.5.2 Operational state model of managed entities 37
2.6 Exchange format for IEC 61499 entities 39
2.6.1 Textual syntax for IEC 61499 entities 39
2.6.2 XML-exchange format 41
2.7 Summary 43

3 Defining function block types 45
3.1 Types and instances 45
3.2 Different form of function blocks 45
3.3 External interface declaration 46
3.3.1 Static interface declaration 47
3.3.2 Defining the dynamic interface behaviour 48
3.3.3 2 out of 3 voter example 50
3.4 Defining basic function blocks 53
3.4.1 Internal behaviour 53
3.4.2 Execution control chart features 55
3.4.3 Execution of basic function blocks 56
3.4.4 Behaviour of instances of basic function blocks 59
3.4.5 Basic function block examples 59
3.5 Definition composite function blocks 62
3.5.1 Rules for composite function block type specification 62
3.5.2 Execution of composite function blocks 64
3.5.3 Composite function block example 64
3.6 Summary 68

4 Structuring applications 69
4.1 Application structuring with subapplications 69
4.1.1 Rules for subapplication type specification 71
4.1.2 Rules for subapplication execution 72
4.1.3 Subapplication example 72
4.1.4 Subapplication distributed example 74
4.1.5 Guidelines for using subapplications 77
4.2 Structured interfaces using adapters 78
4.2.1 Adapter concept 79
4.2.2 Defining adapter types 81
4.2.3 Modelling the behaviour of adapter types 82
4.2.4 Using adapter types in function blocks 83
4.2.5 Adapter interface usage example 85
4.2.6 Guidelines for using adapters 88
4.3 Summary 88

5 Service interface function blocks 91
5.1 Overview 91
5.2 Interface specifications 93
5.2.1 Standard inputs and outputs for service interface function blocks 93
5.2.2 Service sequence diagrams for service interface function blocks 94
5.3 Type definitions 98
5.3.1 General service interface function block types 98
5.3.2 Example service interface function block types 100
5.3.3 Textual syntax – service interface function block example 101
5.4 Communication service interface function blocks 103
5.4.1 Function blocks for unidirectional transactions 103
5.4.2 Function blocks for bidirectional transactions 104
5.5 Management function blocks 106
5.5.1 Examples 108
5.5.2 Managed function blocks 108
5.6 Summary 109

6 Event function blocks 111
6.1 Overview 111
6.2 Standard event function block types 113
6.2.1 Event Splitter 114
6.2.2 Event Merger 114
6.2.3 Two Event Rendezvous 114
6.2.4 Permissive Event Propagator 116
6.2.5 Event Selector 116
6.2.6 Event Switch 117
6.2.7 Delayed Event Propagator 117
6.2.8 Restart Event Generator 118
6.2.9 Cyclic Event Generator 118
6.2.10 Event Train Generator 119
6.2.11 Event Train Table-driven Generator 120
6.2.12 Separate Event Table-driven Generator 121
6.2.13 Event-driven Bistable 122
6.2.14 D (data latch) Bistable 123
6.2.15 Boolean Rising Edge Detector 123
6.2.16 Boolean Falling Edge Detector 124
6.2.17 Event-driven Up Counter 125
6.3 Using event function blocks for event flow control 125
6.3.1 Basic event flow control 125
6.3.2 Conditional event propagation 127
6.3.3 Modelling control tasks 128
6.4 Summary 129

7 Industrial application examples 131
7.1 Overview 131
7.2 Temperature control example 132
7.3 Conveyor test station example 135
7.3.1 Distributed system model 141
7.4 Fieldbus applications 143
7.4.1 Analogue input function block example 146
7.4.2 Further generalisation of the analogue input function block 151
7.5 Concluding remarks 153
7.6 Summary 154

8 Epilogue 155
8.1 Current status of IEC 61499 155
8.2 Engineering Support Task 157
8.3 Compliance to IEC 61499 159
8.3.1 IEC 61499 compliance profiles 159
8.3.2 Device classes 160
8.4 Large-scale industrial applications 161
8.5 Summary

Powered by Google
Search the full text of this book