IET member a Queen Elizabeth Prize recipient

20 March 2013
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Internet pioneer Sir Tim Berners-Lee HonFIET

Sir Tim Berners-Lee HonFIET among Internet pioneers to be first recipients of the Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering.

IET Honorary Fellow Sir Tim Berners-Lee among Internet pioneers to be first recipients of the Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering.

The first Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering was awarded to five pioneers of the Internet and World Wide Web, among them Sir Tim HonFIET. The joint winners, Sir Tim together with Robert Kahn, Vinton Cerf, Louis Pouzin and Marc Andreessen, were awarded at a ceremony at the Royal Academy of Engineering, London.

Commenting on the award, IET president Professor Andy Hopper said: “Most importantly to me, this prize is about showing off the best of the best and reminding society that world-changing innovations are so often born inside the minds of engineers. The IET warmly welcomes the Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering and congratulates this year’s winners. My hope is that this prize will, in the years ahead, become one of the most revered and respected prizes in the world.

“The Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering has the potential to be a real game-changer in terms of raising the profile of engineers and engineering. In this country, there is still a general lack of awareness of how engineering underpins people’s everyday lives, as well as being a bedrock of the UK economy. This prize is a big step in the right direction to putting that right.”

Best known as the inventor of the World Wide Web, IET member Sir Tim is the director of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), which oversees the Web's continued development. He is also the founder of the World Wide Web Foundation, and is a senior researcher and holder of the Founders Chair at the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory.

In 2004, Sir Tim was knighted by the Queen for his pioneering work. He is also remembered for his part in the opening ceremony of the 2012 Summer Olympics, when he was honoured as the ‘Inventor of the World Wide Web’, appearing in person, working at a NeXT Computer in the London Olympic Stadium. He tweeted, "This is for everyone", which was instantly spelled out in LCD lights attached to the chairs of the 80,000 people present in the audience.

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