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Topic Title: Heat detector tester?
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Created On: 02 March 2013 07:03 PM
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 02 March 2013 07:03 PM
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alanblaby

Posts: 401
Joined: 09 March 2012

I've got a kitchen to test, and need a smoke detector / heat tester that can do 80 degrees.
Do such things exist?
If so, could you recommend one?

On the same subject, what smoke alarm testers do you use?
I'm current using a 'Smoke Sabre' aerosol can, which is fine for domestic properties, but too short for an office block I may need to test soon.
Any recommendations?

Thanks
Alan.
 02 March 2013 07:48 PM
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frspikeyhead

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Just out of interest why do you need such a detector.
 02 March 2013 09:18 PM
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chunk522

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I usually use a hair dryer for the heat detector test as the real deal are around £300 : ( last time I looked anyway.
You can buy the smoke detector testers that fit straight over the detector and insert the areosol smoke staright into the chamber again these are expensive and unless you testing regularly I would spend the money as there are alternatives.
 02 March 2013 10:36 PM
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alanblaby

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Originally posted by: frspikeyhead

Just out of interest why do you need such a detector.


To see if it trips at 80 degrees.
If it goes off at 50, they'll be having false alarms, if it goes off only at 100, they could be having a fire.
The detector is set for 80 degrees as it is in a small enclosed area with 6 gas rings and an oven in it, temperatures at the (low) ceiling could exceed 60 degrees pretty easily, hence it is set at 80.

If it was just a plain 'heat' detector, then a hairdryer could suffice, albeit you never know at what temperature the detector actually trips at, just that it does go off when warmed.
 03 March 2013 12:30 AM
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DOUGIE1000

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fit and forget....



who said that...tut tut tut

-------------------------
Dougie
Power Plus Electrical.co.uk

My mission is to live as long as possible......so far so good!
 03 March 2013 05:07 PM
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frspikeyhead

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Try asking the manufacturers how they test them.
 03 March 2013 06:53 PM
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sparkingchip

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By pressing the test button.

Andy
 03 March 2013 07:15 PM
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alanblaby

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From the manual:

"Heat Detectors: ! Using a heat gun or hair dryer capable of generating temperatures of up to 95°C, direct the heat source towards the heat sensing elements, visible through the side of the outer cover, from a distance of 15 to 30cm. Care should be taken not to allow the plastic surface temperature to exceed 110°C otherwise damage may occur. "

I want to do it correctly, so will be buying a heat tester, which have a set temperature, ensuring it both meets the temperature required, and does not burn the detector. Solo seem to the most popular, albeit at £200. However, if I get this Contract, it will pay for itself.

Alan.
 04 March 2013 12:04 AM
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alancapon

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Originally posted by: alanblaby
. . . On the same subject, what smoke alarm testers do you use?
I'm current using a 'Smoke Sabre' aerosol can, which is fine for domestic properties, but too short for an office block I may need to test soon. . .

Solo also do a telescopic rod set for smoke alarms which are suitable for up to 6m. Additional rods are available, which will allow 9m high detectors to be accessed.

As well as the adaptor for the aerosol can, there is also an adaptor that allows you to remove and refit (with a bit of practice) the detector using the rods, meaning you do not need a ladder.

There is also an attachment (according to the catalogue) that allows heat detectors to be tested using the telescopic rod set.

Regards,

Alan.
 04 March 2013 02:14 PM
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patt2

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Originally posted by: frspikeyhead

Try asking the manufacturers how they test them.


Aico state on their website that using the test button is sufficient to test their products, and to refer any queries back to them.

A good selection of free information books and an App are free from their download section on their website.
 04 March 2013 11:37 PM
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Dave69

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a proper heat tester will go to any heat, if its just a rate of change detector a good old heat gun does the job fine, as for smoke detectors at high level I just just use a length or two of 20mm pvc conduit and a normal can of smoke
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