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Topic Title: Wagos loose in junction box - rough or OK?
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Created On: 13 October 2017 08:11 AM
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 13 October 2017 08:11 AM
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TimJWatts

Posts: 402
Joined: 07 August 2013

Hi folks,

I just wondered: do you find this:

Junction box

rough or perfectly good practice?

I'm planning on doing quite a bit of that for my central heating as it's simple and flexible. But equally, I have pride and I want to do my bit as nicely as possible.

Always looking to improve my standards...

Thank you,

Tim
 13 October 2017 09:39 AM
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pww235

Posts: 181
Joined: 03 April 2014

No rougher than choc block.

Not fantastic as there is no strain relief on the cables but I'll admit to doing exactly that in my own home to 'joint' the switched live behind the light switches in rooms that now have wireless controls (Hue).

IMO if its a situation where you would happily use choc bloc without a second thought, then you'll be fine with a Wago.
 13 October 2017 10:19 AM
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Cremeegg

Posts: 675
Joined: 13 July 2007

The wires are coming downwards into the enclosure, the Wago is resting on the bottom of the enclosure. Where is the strain relief required on the conductors and how would you provide it?
 13 October 2017 10:19 AM
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davezawadi

Posts: 3848
Joined: 26 June 2002

In a fixed install one does not really expect much strain on the cables as they should be firmly fixed.
Wagos are made to hang in the wiring so should be fine as long as the box is deep enough, again experience says that loose but unmoving connectors do not cause any faults, it is only vibration which could be a problem, and again this shouldn't happen in a fixed install.

-------------------------
David
BSc CEng MIET
david@ZawadiSoundAndLighting.co.uk
 13 October 2017 10:49 AM
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TimJWatts

Posts: 402
Joined: 07 August 2013

Thanks everyone -

Just to clarify, any non contained cables will be glanded in (I have some Pratley flat glands for the T+E) and most of the cablees will be dropped down in either rigid PVC or Electroflex to very close to their equipment.

Having bought a length of Electroflex, seems very nice and extremely tough, without being as stiff as Kopex (or as expensive! Used some for my meter tails over the wall plate)

Excellent - Have plan, will implement. Might drop some photos back when done.

I'm a believer in good cable protection in under stairs cupboards, which is where most of this is going - people are wont to sling mops and hoovers in there without much care.

Cheers and thanks for your thoughts...

Tim
 13 October 2017 11:16 AM
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mapj1

Posts: 9371
Joined: 22 July 2004

When it does vibrate a lot, like vehicles, there are proper solutions


and for the smaller 221 series, the 221-500


-------------------------
regards Mike
 13 October 2017 11:27 AM
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ArduinoXR

Posts: 34
Joined: 16 August 2017

Had to look up what a wago connector was....it's brand name? We call them push-in connectors elsewhere :-D
 13 October 2017 12:09 PM
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TimJWatts

Posts: 402
Joined: 07 August 2013

Originally posted by: mapj1

When it does vibrate a lot, like vehicles, there are proper solutions





and for the smaller 221 series, the 221-500




I've used Wago TopJobs for lighting and there were a lot of terminals - but in this case, it would be very bulky to have DIN boxes everywhere


I will have one DIN box at the heart of this, which will have some relays in too (got 2 UFH zones that have to be OR'd to the UFH mixer pump and further OR'd into the boiler demand.
 13 October 2017 12:40 PM
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TimJWatts

Posts: 402
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Originally posted by: ArduinoXR

Had to look up what a wago connector was....it's brand name? We call them push-in connectors elsewhere :-D


Yes - it's a German brand. And they do lever versions too - which are super handy if you have to mix solid and fine stranded conductors.
 13 October 2017 01:15 PM
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sparkingchip

Posts: 9963
Joined: 18 January 2003

Originally posted by: ArduinoXR

Had to look up what a wago connector was....it's brand name? We call them push-in connectors elsewhere :-D


My main wholesaler has a new display of Wago connectors to replace
a competitors brand, because when a trade name becomes the generic name for a product it tends to be the brand people want, like Biro and Sellotape.

Andy B.
 13 October 2017 01:37 PM
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ArduinoXR

Posts: 34
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Originally posted by: sparkingchip

Originally posted by: ArduinoXR



Had to look up what a wago connector was....it's brand name? We call them push-in connectors elsewhere :-D




My main wholesaler has a new display of Wago connectors to replace

a competitors brand, because when a trade name becomes the generic name for a product it tends to be the brand people want, like Biro and Sellotape.



Andy B.


Yep that's it. Haven't seen it outside the UK myself
 13 October 2017 01:49 PM
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mapj1

Posts: 9371
Joined: 22 July 2004

Wago are German, and the company cut their teeth designing connectors for the German Railway, and have been doing spring loaded things since the mid 1970s.
As a result the designs are well tested and if used as specified, ratings have a good safety margin.
( Note, in German, to pronounce it properly, it would be spoken "Vaaar- Go", not as most Englisch would say "Waay-Go" )
Although I had already see them when working in Germany several times in the early 2000s, they seemed to hit the UK and US markets in a significant way only from about 2010 onwards.
I have used them with great success in some Mil-Spec and vehicular environs, though I often specify a bootlace ferrule if small multicore signal wires are being used.
Certainly a step up on the no-name ones.


And to the O-P having the connectors free and fishable allows better inspection than mounted tight to the back of the box. When movement is not an issue, I's prefer them to be accessible, and when mounted, I like the supports you can pull them out of, or pre-wire and then push in.

-------------------------
regards Mike
 13 October 2017 01:51 PM
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mikejumper

Posts: 2416
Joined: 14 December 2006

Assuming a blanking plate is used to cover the steel the steel socket box, how is it earthed?
 13 October 2017 01:53 PM
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mapj1

Posts: 9371
Joined: 22 July 2004

If no accessory then extra g/y to the back box, and then the screws. As yet a vibration resistant contacts to the backbox is a problem not solved. Nordlock maybe.

-------------------------
regards Mike
 13 October 2017 06:08 PM
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dustydazzler

Posts: 1354
Joined: 19 January 2016

No issue with loose wagos or connection blocks in a box enclosure so long as the incoming cables are adequately held / clipped in place.
Have witnessed many a nice sparky faffing about with super glue and getting it stuck all over their fingers and all over the cable trying to glue a connector block to the back Of a switch box. Totally unnecessary imo
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