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Topic Title: Weighing up options for P/T post-grad study - MSc or MEng?
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Created On: 03 September 2013 12:57 PM
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 03 September 2013 12:57 PM
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CelticHeathen

Posts: 46
Joined: 10 December 2012

Hi all,

I have read with interest many of the posts here regarding registration requirements for IEng/CEng, but I am currently torn between 2 options as regards the academic requirements.

I completed my BEng (Hons) with the Open University, but due to many issues with poor service (incompetent admin, poor/AWOL Tutors, etc.) I am voting with my wallet and doing the Masters elsewhere.

With this in mind, I am looking at P/T opportunities with brick and mortar Universities (Aberdeen Uni has a good MSc in Subsea Engineering, apparently. Liverpool John Moore has some good courses also).

My questions are as follows:

In terms of wanting to achieve Chartership, does the MSc or the MEng carry more weight?

Which Universities can you recommend for P/T courses to top-up from a BEng (Hons)?

Does an Open Uni BEng (Hons) carry weight as regards the entry requirements for typical Masters courses?

Thank you in advance to anyone willing to help.
 03 September 2013 05:04 PM
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MAWilson

Posts: 48
Joined: 22 February 2006

To my knowledge, MEng is the direct 4 year university path with the MSc is the straight forward further learning path with a relevant BEng (Hons). After a certain amount of time in industry, it is not clear to me the worth of doing a Masters unless you're talking about a specific field of interest which you are involved in. The transferable skills developed will not be that great for the price of the course though the challenge would probably be worth while. CEng can be obtained with a BEng upon IPD assessment which you may find leaves you quite close to the criteria; may be down to 2-4 units of a Masters Course.

In the end it's a personal decision so wish you luck.
 04 September 2013 01:26 AM
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MosheW

Posts: 192
Joined: 14 April 2013

Make sure your program is professionally accredited for CEng.
You can download IET accredited programs list . Also spend time to understand UK SPEC for CEng, see how your experience and training map to it.

Your BEng (Hons) with the Open University,is it IET or EngC licensed member institution accredited?
 05 September 2013 03:49 PM
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CelticHeathen

Posts: 46
Joined: 10 December 2012

Originally posted by: MAWilson

To my knowledge, MEng is the direct 4 year university path with the MSc is the straight forward further learning path with a relevant BEng (Hons). After a certain amount of time in industry, it is not clear to me the worth of doing a Masters unless you're talking about a specific field of interest which you are involved in. The transferable skills developed will not be that great for the price of the course though the challenge would probably be worth while. CEng can be obtained with a BEng upon IPD assessment which you may find leaves you quite close to the criteria; may be down to 2-4 units of a Masters Course.

In the end it's a personal decision so wish you luck.


Thank you both for your replies, it's much appreciated.

Firstly, I have been told by Academics (i.e. Lecturers, bosses in industry) that the MEng usually carries more weight, as it offers more variety, while the MSc less so, even though it is more specialised and requires "a period of further study". I would like to break into Subsea Engineering, for instance (I'm in the Power/Electrical industry at the moment) so an MSc seems ideal, but I am considering both avenues.

Which brings me to MosheW's question...

When in my final year, they decided to phase out the BEng I was on, with an IET-accredited BEng. I had the same path (some had to drop back a year) except for one (expensive) module and so decided that, rather than drag my studies on for another unnecessary year, I stayed with the non-accredited degree.

I would hate to think ONE 1st YEAR MODULE will count against me in the future, though...
 07 September 2013 06:05 PM
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dlane

Posts: 681
Joined: 28 September 2007

In my opinion the MEng and MSc carry both the same weight. The CEng spec looks at a level of learning and both of the qualifications meet that level.

There are many universities out there that now offer part-time courses. Besides the 2 you have mentioned I would look at Newcastle, Aston, Loughborough or Brunel. All offer part time and distance learning. An MSc part time is usually over 3 years with the option to go for a PGCert or a PGDip, if you just want to make up certain modules.

As Moshe has pointed out the ideal solution is to go for an accredited degree, it is an easier tick in the box, however I would prefer the option of going for a subject that interests me more or enhances my career and put in a bit more work in the CEng application if it needs it.

An Open University BEng will be fine for entrance onto post graduate study. If you do distance learning you have much less impact on university resources and they tend to take on higher numbers of students.

If you intend to do a full MSc for your CEng application then I would not be at all concerned about the accreditation of the BEng and the missing module. If you tried for CEng without the MSc then you may have to put in some more work to show the required level of learning. It depends what the module was and what work based learning you could show in place of it and up to the masters level, which you would have to do anyway without an MSc.

Good luck with your studies

Kind regards

Donald Lane
 08 September 2013 07:04 PM
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MosheW

Posts: 192
Joined: 14 April 2013

Your studies will benefit you. Employers value education and competing for jobs in some areas advanced degrees area plus.
As to registration the IET and EngC provide flexibility in rout to CEng.

Also in other countries since EngC is signatory to Washington Accord having an accredited degree will make it eligible or reduce the number of obstacles to registration in another countries.
 09 September 2013 01:19 PM
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CelticHeathen

Posts: 46
Joined: 10 December 2012

Originally posted by: dlane

In my opinion the MEng and MSc carry both the same weight. The CEng spec looks at a level of learning and both of the qualifications meet that level.



There are many universities out there that now offer part-time courses. Besides the 2 you have mentioned I would look at Newcastle, Aston, Loughborough or Brunel. All offer part time and distance learning. An MSc part time is usually over 3 years with the option to go for a PGCert or a PGDip, if you just want to make up certain modules.



As Moshe has pointed out the ideal solution is to go for an accredited degree, it is an easier tick in the box, however I would prefer the option of going for a subject that interests me more or enhances my career and put in a bit more work in the CEng application if it needs it.



An Open University BEng will be fine for entrance onto post graduate study. If you do distance learning you have much less impact on university resources and they tend to take on higher numbers of students.



If you intend to do a full MSc for your CEng application then I would not be at all concerned about the accreditation of the BEng and the missing module. If you tried for CEng without the MSc then you may have to put in some more work to show the required level of learning. It depends what the module was and what work based learning you could show in place of it and up to the masters level, which you would have to do anyway without an MSc.



Good luck with your studies



Kind regards



Donald Lane


Thanks for your most helpful reply, Donald.

What I can't get my head around is the fact that MSc and MEng carry the same weight, while the former has 180 points and the latter only an additional 120 points after completion of BEng.
 09 September 2013 10:29 PM
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dlane

Posts: 681
Joined: 28 September 2007

To be perfectly honest I don't think there is any one who can categorically answer your question, I don't think the universities themselves can really answer it.

From my understanding, the MSc carries the extra points usually due to the final project, the MSc will last 12 months full time and are subjects in their own right. An MSc can have a higher research content than an MEng.

An MEng is an extension of the BEng course and usually lasts an academic year, ie 9 months. If your BEng is in Electrical Engineering then the MEng will also have that title. When going for an MSc you could change the subject to something different such as applied mathematics, engineering management or even an MBA.

All the universities differ and you need to look at the content of the courses to find out exactly what they will offer you.

However, in the eyes of industry someone with an MEng will be in the same position as someone with an MSc and that is also the case for a CEng application. When applying for a job, an MSc in a different subject to your BEng might enhance your application if it fits into the job requirements, such as an MBA if applying for managerial posts.

Kind regards

Donald Lane
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