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Topic Title: Non Accredited degree
Topic Summary: BEng Tech (Hons) Renewable Energy Engineering **a new degree**
Created On: 07 April 2012 12:20 PM
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 09 April 2012 07:34 PM
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westonpa

Posts: 1771
Joined: 10 October 2007

Originally posted by: NickyTeasdale
I'm just worried i'll get to the end of the degree and fall short of the educational requirements for IEng status. I just want assurance I won't. I'll have a chat with uni and hopefully they'll put me at ease. Just had a bad experience throughout the foundation degree so i'm a little pessamistic.

Thanks

Yes it could be really difficult if you get a good job but do not get IEng status, that will be a real downer on your life. Try to maintain a perspective as you do not see many job adverts asking for IEng.

Network Rail Graduate Programmes and the type of role you spoke about:

"At Network Rail, the infrastructure projects we undertake - both here in the Britain and overseas - do more than just help people get around more easily: they're also of huge benefit to the country's long-term economic prosperity. Do an MSc in Project Management and you could soon be given real responsibility on transformative schemes like Thameslink or Crossrail - currently Europe's largest civil engineering project.

WHAT WILL YOU NEED? You'll need a degree (minimum of a 2:2), at least 280 UCAS points and the commitment to undertake and complete a Masters degree. For those with the enthusiasm, motivation and desire to learn, we'll pay for all your fees and accommodation in addition to a £5k subsidy.

When you complete your MSc, you'll be offered a full-time position. Take it on, and you can expect all the tools you need to achieve your goals. Alongside specialist training and the opportunity to step-up into a proper role, you'll gain professional qualifications in your chosen area. Most importantly, your work will contribute to the transformation of Britain's rail travel."

I do not see the IEng requirement there! With the MSc and appropriate experience I would think gaining IEng would not be too much of a problem.

Regards.
 09 April 2012 08:00 PM
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scottseedell

Posts: 58
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Originally posted by: westonpa

Originally posted by: scottseedell

Many employers are weary of people with 1st class degrees with exceptional grades throughout as they can be nerds with no personalities.


Where is your evidence to support these statements? I have worked directly for several of the worlds top 10 companies and indirectly for many others and I have never seen any evidence to support either of your statements.

However, a 2:2 (even a high one) will probably not even get you past the initial stage of the application process.


And what is your evidence to back this statement up?

They will state a minimum of 2:2 on the application (probably to avoid being overly discriminatory) but in reality they will filter through anything below 2:1 and bin it.


Where is your evidence to support this?



Regards.


For starters I have also worked for many companies and now work for a company with an annual turnover of £22.8 billion who believe it or not know a thing or two about interviewing graduates. I know for a fact that my director will be wary of a high-flying student with consistently high grades as many do indeed turn out to possess no social skills. I'm not for a second saying that anyone with a 1st is a 'nerd' but my personal perception of these type of students also tends to agree with that of my employer. There were some I went uni with that never came for a pint after lessons, laughed at any jokes or got involved in any group activites at all if they could possibly help it. Regardless of whether they got 85% in all their subjects (most of that type did), I personally would not let them anywhere near a graduate job. Give me a 65% student with a sense of humour and a personality any day.

I need offer no evidence other than my own experience.

If you're looking for evidence that a 2:2 will not get you past the application process I suggest you check out virtually every graduate application which in most cases states quite clearly that they expect graduates with at least a 2:1. Feel free to check this out if you don't believe me.

-------------------------
Scott Seedell - BSc(Hons) IEng MIET
 09 April 2012 08:04 PM
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scottseedell

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westonpa...seeings as you seem to know it all on these forums, chastising all that offer effective and accurate advice; what were your experiences of the 'nerdy' type students when you went to university? Would you give them a graduate job?

I'm assuming after your little outburst that you did actually go to university?

-------------------------
Scott Seedell - BSc(Hons) IEng MIET
 09 April 2012 09:14 PM
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westonpa

Posts: 1771
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Originally posted by: scottseedell
For starters I have also worked for many companies and now work for a company with an annual turnover of £22.8 billion who believe it or not know a thing or two about interviewing graduates. I know for a fact that my director will be wary of a high-flying student with consistently high grades as many do indeed turn out to possess no social skills.

There are plenty of people in jail with a lack of 'social skills' and the vast majority of them do not have a good education. So where does the correlation come between 'no social skills' and a 1st class degree? Social skills like intelligence can be defined in many different ways so just because they do not have the skills which you judge to be 'social' does not mean they do not have them.
I'm not for a second saying that anyone with a 1st is a 'nerd' but my personal perception of these type of students also tends to agree with that of my employer.


"Many employers are weary of people with 1st class degrees with exceptional grades throughout as they can be nerds with no personalities."

There were some I went uni with that never came for a pint after lessons, laughed at any jokes or got involved in any group activites at all if they could possibly help it. Regardless of whether they got 85% in all their subjects (most of that type did), I personally would not let them anywhere near a graduate job. Give me a 65% student with a sense of humour and a personality any day.

Give me the correct person for the particular job on offer, any day. If that person requires a little encouragement, mentoring and developing then an experienced and professional engineer should be able to offer it.....especially if they themselves claim to have good social skills!
I need offer no evidence other than my own experience.

Fair enough then, I have countered your experience with my own and I have yet to find an employer weary of taking on graduates with 1st class degrees or have yet to find a 'nerd with no personality'.
If you're looking for evidence that a 2:2 will not get you past the application process I suggest you check out virtually every graduate application which in most cases states quite clearly that they expect graduates with at least a 2:1. Feel free to check this out if you don't believe me.

OK then let us go to the very company Nicky was talking about and on which you were posting a reply to, i.e., http://careers.networkrail.co....uates/programmes.html

In every single program it says a minimum 2:2. I agree of course that students should seek to do the best they can but I do not agree that they will not get a decent job with a 2:2.....after all they may have brilliant social skills.

Regards.
 09 April 2012 09:44 PM
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scottseedell

Posts: 58
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Originally posted by: westonpa

Originally posted by: scottseedell

For starters I have also worked for many companies and now work for a company with an annual turnover of £22.8 billion who believe it or not know a thing or two about interviewing graduates. I know for a fact that my director will be wary of a high-flying student with consistently high grades as many do indeed turn out to possess no social skills.


There are plenty of people in jail with a lack of 'social skills' and the vast majority of them do not have a good education. So where does the correlation come between 'no social skills' and a 1st class degree? Social skills like intelligence can be defined in many different ways so just because they do not have the skills which you judge to be 'social' does not mean they do not have them.

I'm not for a second saying that anyone with a 1st is a 'nerd' but my personal perception of these type of students also tends to agree with that of my employer.




"Many employers are weary of people with 1st class degrees with exceptional grades throughout as they can be nerds with no personalities."



There were some I went uni with that never came for a pint after lessons, laughed at any jokes or got involved in any group activites at all if they could possibly help it. Regardless of whether they got 85% in all their subjects (most of that type did), I personally would not let them anywhere near a graduate job. Give me a 65% student with a sense of humour and a personality any day.


Give me the correct person for the particular job on offer, any day. If that person requires a little encouragement, mentoring and developing then an experienced and professional engineer should be able to offer it.....especially if they themselves claim to have good social skills!

I need offer no evidence other than my own experience.


Fair enough then, I have countered your experience with my own and I have yet to find an employer weary of taking on graduates with 1st class degrees or have yet to find a 'nerd with no personality'.

If you're looking for evidence that a 2:2 will not get you past the application process I suggest you check out virtually every graduate application which in most cases states quite clearly that they expect graduates with at least a 2:1. Feel free to check this out if you don't believe me.


OK then let us go to the very company Nicky was talking about and on which you were posting a reply to, i.e., http://careers.networkrail.co....programmes.html



In every single program it says a minimum 2:2. I agree of course that students should seek to do the best they can but I do not agree that they will not get a decent job with a 2:2.....after all they may have brilliant social skills.



Regards.


I came on this thread to offer some advice to Nicky and what I offered was good advice. Feel free to check with anyone else on here if a 2:2 would stand you in better stead than a 2:1. Instead it seems I'm engaging in an irrelevent argument with someone who seems more intent on picking faults in what people say rather than maintaining continuity with the good advice.

I think it shows the level of person I'm dealing with when he attempts to give evidence against my comment that most reputable employers insist on a 2:1 or greater for their graduates. I could counter your pathetic rally with 100s of other graduate applications that will back up my advice but I have a life away from these forums and won't lower myself down to your sad little level. In addition I don't pride myself on catching others out. For the record Nicky; ignore westonpa. If you don't believe what I told you then feel free to look it up or ask the genuine, knowledgeable people on these forums.

Like I said; I'm not for a minute stating that every student who otains a 1st is a nerd but there is definitely a higher correlation of nerds to top end students than anywhere else. To deny this is ridiculous, especially when I have first-hand knowledge of this type. If these type of people want to exagerate this beyond all context then it's their choice.

Westonpa...you never answered my question; what was your experience of the top-end students when you went to university? Were any of them 'nerds'?

-------------------------
Scott Seedell - BSc(Hons) IEng MIET
 09 April 2012 10:14 PM
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westonpa

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Originally posted by: scottseedell
westonpa...seeings as you seem to know it all on these forums, chastising all that offer effective and accurate advice.

Your statements are not backed up by enough evidence to suggest they are accurate. You are perfectly entitled to your perception as is your director but that does not translate into 'many employers are weary of people with 1st class degrees with exceptional grades throughout as they can be nerds with no personalities'.
at were your experiences of the 'nerdy' type students when you went to university? Would you give them a graduate job?

I have never met a 'nerdy' type student but maybe that is because my social skills are good enough to find common ground with the people I meet such that we can hold a mutually interesting conversation. I always go for giving the job to the person I and my colleagues feel will be best able to do the job. We also appreciate that graduates are in most cases younger people and are in need of some mentoring and developing. We feel we have the professionalism and abilities and desire to help develop the next generation of engineers and so where development and mentoring is required we offer it.
I'm assuming after your little outburst that you did actually go to university?

Another negative statement, from someone who is challenged on their writings about 'nerds and people with no personalities'. Such talk
has no place in professional and ethical engineering in my opinion. Note that I make the point there that it is my opinion and do not start trying to suggest that many employers think it.

I can respect people's opinions even if I disagree with them but not when they start giving negative type statements about young people with good degree grades and for which there is no evidence to back up their statements.

Regards.
 09 April 2012 10:29 PM
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westonpa

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Originally posted by: scottseedell
I came on this thread to offer some advice to Nicky and what I offered was good advice. Feel free to check with anyone else on here if a 2:2 would stand you in better stead than a 2:1. Instead it seems I'm engaging in an irrelevent argument with someone who seems more intent on picking faults in what people say rather than maintaining continuity with the good advice.

So now someone cannot deal with the evidence which showed that the employer Nicky was talking about required a 2:2.
I think it shows the level of person I'm dealing with when he attempts to give evidence against my comment that most reputable employers insist on a 2:1 or greater for their graduates.

Well Scott did you not ask me to go and check? If you do not like the evidence fair enough, but it is there for all to see.
I could counter your pathetic rally with 100s of other graduate applications that will back up my advice but I have a life away from these forums and won't lower myself down to your sad little level.

So you think this is professional and ethical do you? Unable to counter the argument with well thought out and intelligent discussion and so has to resort to yet more negative comments. Please advise, are these the social skills your company requires?
In addition I don't pride myself on catching others out. For the record Nicky; ignore westonpa. If you don't believe what I told you then feel free to look it up or ask the genuine, knowledgeable people on these forums.

Well 1st try the Network Rail site.
Like I said; I'm not for a minute stating that every student who otains a 1st is a nerd but there is definitely a higher correlation of nerds to top end students than anywhere else. To deny this is ridiculous, especially when I have first-hand knowledge of this type. If these type of people want to exagerate this beyond all context then it's their choice.

You made the statement about nerds and people with no personalities.....it is there for all to see and judge, as they so wish. I mearly said such talk had no place in professional and ethical engineering and asked you to provide some evidence to back up your statements which you attributed to 'many employers'.

Regards.

Edited: 09 April 2012 at 10:38 PM by westonpa
 09 April 2012 10:43 PM
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westonpa

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I of course accept that it is better for students to strive for the best grade they can attain and that many employers do require a 2:1 or above. But we should give hope to those who do not attain it, in my opinion.

Regards.
 09 April 2012 10:50 PM
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scottseedell

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Originally posted by: westonpa

Originally posted by: scottseedell

I came on this thread to offer some advice to Nicky and what I offered was good advice. Feel free to check with anyone else on here if a 2:2 would stand you in better stead than a 2:1. Instead it seems I'm engaging in an irrelevent argument with someone who seems more intent on picking faults in what people say rather than maintaining continuity with the good advice.


So now someone cannot deal with the evidence which showed that the employer Nicky was talking about required a 2:2.

I think it shows the level of person I'm dealing with when he attempts to give evidence against my comment that most reputable employers insist on a 2:1 or greater for their graduates.


Well Scott did you not ask me to go and check? If you do not like the evidence fair enough, but it is there for all to see.

I could counter your pathetic rally with 100s of other graduate applications that will back up my advice but I have a life away from these forums and won't lower myself down to your sad little level.[/q]

So you think this is professional and ethical do you? Unable to counter the argument with well thought out and intelligent discussion and so has to resort to yet more negative comments. Please advise, are these the social skills your company requires?

In addition I don't pride myself on catching others out. For the record Nicky; ignore westonpa. If you don't believe what I told you then feel free to look it up or ask the genuine, knowledgeable people on these forums.


Well 1st try the Network Rail site.

Like I said; I'm not for a minute stating that every student who otains a 1st is a nerd but there is definitely a higher correlation of nerds to top end students than anywhere else. To deny this is ridiculous, especially when I have first-hand knowledge of this type. If these type of people want to exagerate this beyond all context then it's their choice.


You made the statement about nerds and people with no personalities.....it is there for all to see and judge, as they so wish.



Regards.


Like I said I could find hundreds of graduate offers which will state that applicants need a minimum of a 2:1 but I'm not that petty, feel free to ask around and see what they think. I can see this debate boiling over into a needless argument so I will rephrase my original statement into one that cannot be denied or needs to be backed up with evidence (not that I see any other poster on here backing up their opinions).

Here goes:

'Some employers are wary of some people with 1st class degrees with exceptional grades throughout as in my personal experience (matched with my employer's), some top-end students will no doubt prove to be nerds'

Will the fact that I now make it an opinion finally be enough to stop the incessant whining or are you going to challenge my opinion and experiences too?

However I noticed that you still meandered a deliberate answer on my question:

I'm assuming after your little outburst that you did actually go to university?

-------------------------
Scott Seedell - BSc(Hons) IEng MIET
 09 April 2012 10:56 PM
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scottseedell

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Originally posted by: westonpa

I of course accept that it is better for students to strive for the best grade they can attain and that many employers do require a 2:1 or above. But we should give hope to those who do not attain it, in my opinion.



Regards.


This is exactly why I didn't respond by sending 100s of links verifying my claims. My reluctance to respond was justified by you verifying my claim yourself.

Regards

-------------------------
Scott Seedell - BSc(Hons) IEng MIET
 10 April 2012 02:05 PM
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westonpa

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Scott, thank you for your responses. Note that in my original reply to your post I mearly asked you to back up what you said with some evidence....not to difficult a challenge for an experienced engineer. I also countered your experience with my own, and so disagreed with yours....again hardly unprofessional. My comment on 'nerds' was to Nicky as I recall and anyway if you think such talk has a place in engineering then expect to be challenged on it.

Your replies however use rhetoric such as 'pathetic, outburst, rant, sad little world, ignore Wesonpa's opinion' and so on. You professed that social skills were of some importance and so you of all people should try to set a good professional and ethical example. If you see things different then fair enough you are of course entitled to your opinion.

In answer to your question yes I have attended university and college and so on.....several times over my career to date. I think CPD is important for any professional engineer.

Regards.
 10 April 2012 07:16 PM
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scottseedell

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Originally posted by: westonpa

Scott, thank you for your responses. Note that in my original reply to your post I mearly asked you to back up what you said with some evidence....not to difficult a challenge for an experienced engineer. I also countered your experience with my own, and so disagreed with yours....again hardly unprofessional. My comment on 'nerds' was to Nicky as I recall and anyway if you think such talk has a place in engineering then expect to be challenged on it.



I'm not in the habit of having to back up everything I lay claim to have encountered and certainly never before on these forums. If I really wanted I could have found plenty of evidence to substantiate my claims that top-end students can lack social skills and a personality. In fact I would be very surprised if most people could not give some experience of meeting such a type at school or university (such people were known as 'squares' in my school days). Do you think that these type of people would never filter down to engineering courses at university? Do you also think that there are no employers out there that would want to distance themselves from this type of character during recruitment?

Just because you have never encountered such a person it does not mean they do not exist. Engineering is about welcoming the opinions of others and not merely challenging them in a manner as if they're making things up. My original statement said that many employers are wary of people with 1st class degrees with exceptional grades throughout as they can be nerds with no personalities. Although later corrected to form more of an opinion, I stand by this statement as largely true. Although not all employers will take this view and not all students with exceptional grades throughout are nerds, I myself have personally encountered more than one employer who satisfy the above and it would be ridiculously naive of me to assume that there were not more out there. Whether or not I present evidence which proves or disproves this theory, I have personal experience which believe it or not can be passed on for advisory purposes without bonafide evidence.

For the record, I believe we want the same thing here; a good source of advice for Nicky. I believe my advice was good and it was seconded by another poster just after and so this seems to reinforce this thought.

Regards

-------------------------
Scott Seedell - BSc(Hons) IEng MIET
 10 April 2012 08:28 PM
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scottseedell

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Originally posted by: westonpa

Originally posted by: scottseedell

Many employers are weary of people with 1st class degrees with exceptional grades throughout as they can be nerds with no personalities.


Where is your evidence to support these statements? I have worked directly for several of the worlds top 10 companies and indirectly for many others and I have never seen any evidence to support either of your statements.

However, a 2:2 (even a high one) will probably not even get you past the initial stage of the application process.


And what is your evidence to back this statement up?

They will state a minimum of 2:2 on the application (probably to avoid being overly discriminatory) but in reality they will filter through anything below 2:1 and bin it.


Where is your evidence to support this?



Regards.


I'm generally not in the habit of replying with 'I told you so' responses but the way in which I was so vigorously challenged led me to google employer's graduate criteria. Guess what I found on the very first site?

'Two-thirds of large employers say they use a 2:1 to sift job applications'

Feel free to read the below article which destroys any last remnants of opposition at my bottom two statements above that were apparently so successfully 'countered'. If people spent more time believing what they were told and less time instantly opposing it in an attempt to look intelligent then half of this thread could have been avoided.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/mone...ification-landing-job



-------------------------
Scott Seedell - BSc(Hons) IEng MIET
 11 April 2012 01:02 PM
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westonpa

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Originally posted by: scottseedell
I'm not in the habit of having to back up everything I lay claim to have encountered and certainly never before on these forums. If I really wanted I could have found plenty of evidence to substantiate my claims that top-end students can lack social skills and a personality. In fact I would be very surprised if most people could not give some experience of meeting such a type at school or university (such people were known as 'squares' in my school days). Do you think that these type of people would never filter down to engineering courses at university? Do you also think that there are no employers out there that would want to distance themselves from this type of character during recruitment?


Let us assume that a person is not suffering from some illness which causes them to be devoid of character etc., then by the accepted definitions used in language and psychology they will have a personality. Actually you confirm this yourself by referring to 'nerd' which means they have distinctive characteristics which you can identify. Therefore your statement about 'no personality' is not accurate. Of course I accept that you have an opinion but when you attribute this to 'many employers' and refer to top class students in a negative way then of course someone is going to challenge you on it. People can have 'poor' social skills at ALL levels and therefore to attach a negative label to students who probably acheived a grade which you would have also taken if you would have acheived it is not really ethical or professional.

Your director will not identify himself or his company and publically state that 'many employers are weary of top class students because they can be nerds with no personalities'. Successful companies employ the best person for the job, in their opinion, and decline a variety of people for a variety of reasons.

You changed your statement to suggest that it was your own opinion and whilst I disagree with you I respect your right to hold that opinion.

Engineering is about welcoming the opinions of others and not merely challenging them in a manner as if they're making things up.

Science is about challenging things and not accepting them at face value in order to find the faults and improve things. That is why we teach/require 'critical analysis' at masters and doctorate levels. If we want to stand up and give our opinions then we must be prepared for someone to challenge us.

Although later corrected to form more of an opinion, I stand by this statement as largely true. Although not all employers will take this view and not all students with exceptional grades throughout are nerds, I myself have personally encountered more than one employer who satisfy the above and it would be ridiculously naive of me to assume that there were not more out there. Whether or not I present evidence which proves or disproves this theory, I have personal experience which believe it or not can be passed on for advisory purposes without bonafide evidence.


You gave your advice and it exists in the forum for all to see.

For the record, I believe we want the same thing here; a good source of advice for Nicky. I believe my advice was good and it was seconded by another poster just after and so this seems to reinforce this thought.


I conclude that some of your advice was good and relevant but please keep in mind that others can also give their advice and just because the majority think something it does not mean they are correct. There are many cases in history where the many were proven to be wrong and the few were found to be correct. However, the few can also be wrong as well.

Regards.
 11 April 2012 01:56 PM
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westonpa

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Originally posted by: scottseedell
I'm generally not in the habit of replying with 'I told you so' responses but the way in which I was so vigorously challenged led me to google employer's graduate criteria. Guess what I found on the very first site?

Well why did you not just go find this evidence in the first place then? Instead of starting to write 'pathetic, sad little word, rant', and so on.

If people spent more time believing what they were told.


Many years ago they told people smoking was healthy, should people have believed this?
Many years ago they told people the world was flat, should people have believed this?
Many years ago in the USA they told people that 'Black' people should not have civil rights, should people have believed this?

Democracy is not about believing everything we are told, that's more of a dictatorship. So now we are finding out even more about your views.

and less time instantly opposing it in an attempt to look intelligent then half of this thread could have been avoided.


This is an IET discussion forum Scott......did you not read that when you signed up? Try to grow up a little and hold a discussion in a professional and ethical way.

Did you miss this bit in your article "Two-thirds of large employers say they use a 2:1 to sift job applications."

Here is another article for you, on the worlds largest economy, as an example:

http://usgovinfo.about.com/od/...iness/a/sbadrives.htm

"Small businesses are job creators. Office of Advocacy funded data and research shows that small businesses represent 99.7 percent of all firms, they create more than half of the private non-farm gross domestic product, and they create 60 to 80 percent of the net new jobs."

Here is another:

http://www.bl.uk/bipc/pdfs/richardreport2008.pdf

"Yet, our 4.4m small and medium-sized businesses (SMEs) are the engine room of our economy, accounting for half of UK employment, 99.7 per cent of all enterprises and half of UK turnover."

Nicky was referring to Network Rail and I proved that they would accept a 2:2....so that was the company Nicky was talking about. I note that in your statements you did not speak about which types of companies or which sizes but rather you made claims which you generalised. If you wish to take it wider then you have to include all companies and employers unless of course you had stated that it was a particular size or type of company.

Regards.
 11 April 2012 05:24 PM
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scottseedell

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You just don't give up do you? I palmed your paltry opposition off with ease at the very first hit that google returned and still you argue, drivel on, provide useless and irrelevant links, refuse to admit that I was correct and then tell me I need to grow up. I made a statement and backed it up with evidence just like you asked for. I only wish I had done it the first place as it would have shut you up long before now. Don't worry, the entire thread is here for people to see just what kind of person you are.

I'm expecting some attempt at an intelligent retort but I won't respond to it because I have settled all that was asked of me.

Why don't you grow up westonpa?

-------------------------
Scott Seedell - BSc(Hons) IEng MIET
 11 April 2012 06:13 PM
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westonpa

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Originally posted by: scottseedell
You just don't give up do you? I palmed your paltry opposition off with ease at the very first hit that google returned and still you argue, drivel on, provide useless and irrelevant links, refuse to admit that I was correct and then tell me I need to grow up. I made a statement and backed it up with evidence just like you asked for. I only wish I had done it the first place as it would have shut you up long before now.

You came up with some decent evidence in the end though, so well done to you for that. Perseverence is a good thing to have.

Don't worry, the entire thread is here for people to see just what kind of person you are.

Why worry, life is to short, have fun and be happy. Let's hope all turns out well for Nicky.

Thanks for the discussion Scott and for taking the time to defend your points.

Regards.
 11 April 2012 07:36 PM
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mbirdi

Posts: 1907
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Originally posted by: NickyTeasdale
In September '12 I will be progressing on to the top-up 3rd year
BEng Tech (Hons) Renewable Energy Engineering degree
which will be brand new to my university.
What will having "Tech" after the BEng mean in real terms?

Just seen the University website. The course looks great. You should go ahead and do it.

It is unusual to see the word Tech (presumably to mean Technology) after the BEng, but not surprising as the course should have been denoted as BSc. That is because BSc and BEng Tech are the same meaning and refer to vocational degree. Whereas BEng on its own refer to a more academic (more mathematics) based degree.

You must remember that the path you chose by doing the foundation degree was the vocational route which ultimately lead to a vocational based degree acceptable for IEng registration. If you want to proceed to CEng level, then you should take the appropriate MSc course with sufficient academic content. The IET are best placed to advise on that.

Hope that helps.

Edited: 11 April 2012 at 07:55 PM by mbirdi
 12 April 2012 10:14 PM
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NickyTeasdale

Posts: 27
Joined: 07 April 2012

Thanks westonpa and scott. That was some battle I see what you're both saying.

Back on topic with mbirdi...

I will definitely be doing the course as it's the only programme I am able to progress onto. I'm enjoying it and looking forward to September but have my reservations.

You think the course should have been denoted a BSc? Why do you think they never then?
It makes sense as my foundation degree is a Sc (FdSc) and most other courses in this field I've Googled are BSc. Does this make a difference?

How do you know BEng Tech and BSc have the same meaning? Is there a website you could point me to?

So is a BEng better than a BEng Tech & Bsc?

"You must remember that the path you chose by doing the foundation degree was the vocational route which ultimately lead to a vocational based degree acceptable for IEng registration."

I have only just found out about accreditation and such like to be honest.

I really hope they accredit my degree. I've been advised it isnt the bee all and end all to achieve IEng status for the future BUT even before this I don't want any handicaps as some employers preferentially recruit from accredited degrees. And I need a job to gain the experience needed for IEng status - Catch 22!

Any advice?

Thanks alot!
 12 April 2012 10:47 PM
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NickyTeasdale

Posts: 27
Joined: 07 April 2012

A catch 22 situation?

1. Employers sometimes preferentially recruit accredited degree graduates. So if you do a none accredited degree your future progression may be handicapped.
2. No job = no experience
3. No experience = no IEng/CEng/etc. status.

Am I getting this right? I've read so much I don't wana confuse myself
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