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Topic Title: CEng status in Europe
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Created On: 21 October 2010 04:22 PM
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 21 October 2010 04:22 PM
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alexdmu

Posts: 1
Joined: 21 September 2001

Is there any European law/agreement which states that CEng members have the same rights with locally registered engineers (i.e. in Germany,France etc.)across the EU?

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alexdmu
 21 October 2010 07:20 PM
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jcm256

Posts: 1793
Joined: 01 April 2006

May not what you are looking for but this information is taken from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chartered_Engineer_(UK)

International equivalence
The level of competence required for registration as a Chartered Engineer in the UK is not comparable to other English-speaking jurisdictions; and set at a higher level. It is comparable, however, to many continental European countries that require master's-level education for registration as a professional engineer. Since the Engineering Council (UK) moved to the M-Level qualification required for registration, there have been inconsistencies in the Washington Accord agreement on the recognition of academic qualifications.
Although the Engineering Council (UK) now requires a master's-level qualification for Chartered Engineer registration, the other Washington Accord signatories have not raised the level of qualification (it remains at the bachelor's degree-level) though North American Bachelors degrees are 4 years in length equivalent to a UK undergraduate Masters degree. A recent International Engineering Alliance (IEA) [2] meeting brought forth these issues regarding the Washington Accord. It was unanimously agreed that all Washington Accord countries will look to follow the path taken by the UK and raise the requirement for professional engineer registration to the master's degree-level. In the meantime, the Engineering Council (UK) can restrict registration to those that hold bachelor's degree qualifications from Washington Accord countries. And reciprocally many current UK qualified Chartered Engineers are not eligible for licensing as Professional Engineers in Canada and the United States since they do not have engineering degree level education. Licensing bodies in North America assess each Chartered Engineers application for P.E / P.Eng on a case by case basis.
Chartered Engineers are entitled to register through the European Federation of National Engineering Associations as a European Engineerand use the pre-nominal of Eur Ing.
Regards
 22 October 2010 06:19 AM
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rar

Posts: 642
Joined: 30 August 2005

The Directive 2005/36.
See:
http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUr...20070101-en.pdf


http://ec.europa.eu/internal_m...ofs&profId=6000


http://www.europeopen.org.uk/index.asp?page=14

http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2007/2781/contents/made

http://195.99.1.70/si/si2007/pdf/uksi_20072781_en.pdf

Edited: 22 October 2010 at 06:25 AM by rar
 02 November 2010 12:32 PM
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dvaidr

Posts: 519
Joined: 08 June 2003

Having worked for multinationals in the past, I've visited many european countries to meet up with cohorts rom the same organisation. They don't have any idea about CEng. IEng or EngTech for that matter. PEng is the only thing that matters to them. Does this tell us something...?
 02 November 2010 02:35 PM
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danielscott

Posts: 461
Joined: 18 April 2003

Originally posted by: dvaidr

Having worked for multinationals in the past, I've visited many european countries to meet up with cohorts rom the same organisation. They don't have any idea about CEng. IEng or EngTech for that matter. PEng is the only thing that matters to them. Does this tell us something...?


You cannot apply for registration in Canada for PEng or the USA for PE unless you are a resident of the country. Not like the UK where anyone from outside the country can apply for any of the designations provided they meet the requirements of the UK Spec, which makes one wonder why, when probably the majority of the applicants will never work or have never worked in the U.K.

At present about 25% of registrants work outside the U.K. and 15% are non-UK citizens. Helps fill the coffers, doesn't it.

Can you imagine what would happen to our fees if the government made it mandatory that only UK citizens need apply.

Daniel
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