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Topic Title: Are engineers who hated school rare?
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Created On: 21 January 2014 08:31 AM
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 21 January 2014 08:31 AM
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jencam

Posts: 608
Joined: 06 May 2007

Are engineers who hated school rare? I have encountered very few engineers in the home education community, but have also noticed that a high proportion of home educators fit into two opposite camps: those who did badly at school but succeeded in later life, and those who did well at school but consider themselved unsuccessful in later life. Such combinations of success and failure have the potential to result in such people being critical of school. Do most engineers fit into the camp of those who succeeded at school then succeeded in later life?
 21 January 2014 11:52 AM
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OMS

Posts: 19427
Joined: 23 March 2004

Well, I absolutely hated school - I found it regimentally insane, staffed by people who could deliver information but knew bugger all about knowledge transfer and were determined to produce what they still saw as the young men of empire - but then it was a boys public school, so perhaps not that suprising.

So, I gritted my teeth, did just enough work to get a mediocre crop of "O" levels, left promptly and got myself a craft apprenticeship much to the disgust of most of my teachers - it was just so artisan, don't you know.

In a technical college environment, with tutors who understood what they were teaching and more importantly how to impart that knowledge, and with the opportunity to "explore ideas" I did OK - and that triggered a desire to learn more, so I went through the route of ONC,OND,HNC,HND, undergraduate and masters degrees in several subjects, on a part time basis.

Successful ? - well engineering has kept a roof over my head, stopped me from starving, provided a few laughs and a few tears along the way and had me working in a few places I probably wouldn't have got to otherwise - depends on how you define "succeeded" I guess ?

Regards

OMS

-------------------------
Failure is always an option
 21 January 2014 01:26 PM
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westonpa

Posts: 1771
Joined: 10 October 2007

My school years were a mixture of good and bad so overall I would say it ended up as happy to have done my time there but also happy to have grown up and left; I tended to benefit from increased independence that work and a salary gave. It's not quite so clear cut with regards to the during school and after school argument because in most cases if we do not like our school then we are stuck with it, for reasons we all know about, whereas if we do not like our work we have more opportunity and possibility to change it; and that also goes for further education studies. I have certainly enjoyed my working years more than my school years but do fully understand that my school years provided the foundations which were then built upon; a person can leave school with poor grades or else no O or A levels etc., but may still have received an 'education' which hepls them a lot later in life. Regards.
 22 January 2014 01:11 AM
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kengreen

Posts: 400
Joined: 15 April 2013

These two posts reveal the truth about our system of education. The are REAL teachers, who inspire pupils, and others who do it for the pay-cheques. In any school where pupils choose the path of their advance the quality of the teaching is very obvious.

Ken Green
 29 January 2014 08:47 PM
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cookers

Posts: 203
Joined: 10 February 2012

You may have a point, my perception of my secondary school experience in a state comprehensive was similar to OMS, with a pinch of physical and emotional abuse thrown in for good measure. So I am not a keen supporter of school education, "another brick in the wall" was my perception.

I followed a similar higher education and career path as OMS, and have been to some extraordinary places and done things that I did not perceive as things I could do at school.

Have I succeeded? Well several times I had opportunity to advance my career (gain status, promotion, and money) but turned some of these down because I didn't want to join that particular rat race, so I did what I wanted to do.
 30 January 2014 11:55 AM
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Avatar for OMS.
OMS

Posts: 19427
Joined: 23 March 2004

You may have a point, my perception of my secondary school experience in a state comprehensive was similar to OMS, with a pinch of physical and emotional abuse thrown in for good measure. So I am not a keen supporter of school education, "another brick in the wall" was my perception.


Yep - the abuse was there as well, in all it's forms - perhaps I should have also pointed out that whilst I went (in part) as a boarder in a public school, I was there because I was a forces brat, not because we had plenty of money - overseas postings got you an allowance for said brats' education.

Personally, I don't hold with all this idea that school influences your life forever - I'm willing to accept it changes your opportunities, perhaps more today than a few decades back, for sure - but what you achieve, is generally up to the individual. Lets face it, up to age 16, and a few O levels only really shows that you may have an ability for learning - it ceases to have any relevance in a few years.

Regards

OMS

-------------------------
Failure is always an option
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