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Topic Title: Transformer Voltage Regulation: Definition??
Topic Summary: Two different definitions -which to use!
Created On: 14 January 2014 11:12 AM
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 14 January 2014 11:12 AM
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awaygood

Posts: 9
Joined: 25 July 2008

There seems to be two definitions of a transformer's percentage voltage regulation. The first compares the difference between no-load and full-load voltages with the no-load voltage, while the other definition compares this with the full-load voltage. Of the two, the former seems to be more intuitive, but the latter seems to be more common these days but seems less intuitive.

The former definition appears in my older UK engineering textbooks, while the latter definition appears in my later US engineering textbooks. I can't find any reason for why there should be two definitions, and why one would be preferred over the other.

So my question is, which definition is 'correct' for the UK (or is it a case of one definition replacing the other)? A supplementary question would be why one definition should be preferred over the other?
 15 January 2014 02:34 AM
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kengreen

Posts: 400
Joined: 15 April 2013

Ask yourself what it is you are trying to express.

Does not "regulation" mean "the drop in performance on load"? As long as you know of that you say it matters little what muddle there exists in the minds of others.

Ken Green
 15 January 2014 05:22 AM
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awaygood

Posts: 9
Joined: 25 July 2008

Thanks for your response, Ken. Unfortunately, I am a teacher, so I have to be precise when it comes to definitions -for exactly that reason: to prevent what 'muddle exists in the minds of others'! When I taught in Canada I used the second definition, but I've seen BOTH definitions used in the UK. So I'm trying to determine which definition should be taught here in the UK, or (as seems often to be the case) whether the US definition has replaced the UK definition..... Extensive searching of the internet has revealed no answer!!!
 15 January 2014 09:14 AM
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ANFierman

Posts: 138
Joined: 25 July 2008

Forgive me if you have already found it but perhaps this link clarifies the distinction between the two definitions:

http://my.safaribooksonline.co...8131760901/navpoint-73

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Andy Fierman

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http://signality.co.uk
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 15 January 2014 10:46 AM
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awaygood

Posts: 9
Joined: 25 July 2008

Hi, Andy. Thank you for your response and for the very helpful reference. It certainly answers my main query. The 'percentage voltage regulation down' appears to be more intuitive than the 'percentage voltage regulation up', so perhaps someone out there has some idea of why the 'percentage voltage regulation up' is generally favoured in North American publications?
 15 January 2014 06:54 PM
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kengreen

Posts: 400
Joined: 15 April 2013

awaygood

would suggest that your proper referee is the publications of the British Standards Association - although I have been in trouble (past tense) for criticising some of their nebulosity!

Your second question is easy. Adhering to the umpteenth part of their constipation the Americans make a tremendous effort to be different to everybody else. That was the stated aim of a certain Mr. Webster when he rendered the English language incomprehensible even to Americans ! ! !

I understand your point about teaching and there can be no better way to learn? I spent 10 years in technical publications and teaching newbies heir own language was only he first step.

Ken
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