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Topic Title: Photos on Debit/Credit Cards
Topic Summary: Why did the photos get dropped?
Created On: 17 October 2013 08:15 AM
Status: Post and Reply
Related E&T article: Identity - how safe are you online?
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 17 October 2013 08:15 AM
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johnhorsley5

Posts: 3
Joined: 25 May 2002

Why did RBS drop photos from their Debit cards? Many years ago our RBS cards had a passport sized photo of each of us on the back of the card and all the retailers loved it. Why did they drop it?
Such photos won't prevent online fraud or theft but it's a low cost way of providing one part of Strong Authentication when using the card in shops. Perhaps the banks are not really interested in providing good security?
 17 October 2013 08:27 AM
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ectophile

Posts: 552
Joined: 17 September 2001

Thge banks are more interested in simplicity and convenience than in security. Just look at the new contactless cards - just wave your card at the till - no need for a PIN.

With the advent if chip & PIN, fraud in shops has dropped anyway. These days, the problem would be cloned cards used overseas (where they don't yet have the chips on their cards) and on-line fraud. In those cases, a photo woudn't help.

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S P Barker BSc PhD MIET
 17 October 2013 01:04 PM
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robinlee

Posts: 5
Joined: 07 November 2002

I read somewhere that transvestites required two cards with two different photos.
 17 October 2013 07:02 PM
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diviner

Posts: 44
Joined: 14 July 2003

I read somewhere, although it may be apocryphal, that a journalist successfully made purchases using a card which had a photo of a gorilla where the card-holder's picture should have been.

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Ian Gordon, MIET CITP MBCS
 18 October 2013 08:25 AM
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planetz31

Posts: 8
Joined: 25 July 2008

Unfortunatly I could well believe that as so often back when signatures were the mainstay you used to some till staff would barely even glance to check the signature on the card and would just stuff the slip in their till and away you go.

I used to work in Tesco (pre-engineering days to fund my education) during the transition and people just stopped checking anything at all. Evan basic things like asking for a cheque guarantee card (back when they were in place) was rarely done and it used to infuriate me.

During that period we were told to check the front of the card to at least ensure it has the correct gender to stop partners from using each others cards (still a criminal offence if the person is not there giving explicit consent).
 02 November 2013 04:56 PM
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HarryJMacdonald

Posts: 259
Joined: 15 May 2002

I suspect the reason is that it required every check out operator to be a policeman and they are not trained or willing to do this. It is easier to let the payment proceed than stop the queue and call the manager, or whatever.
My real gripe is that the banks do not issue "use once" codes for online purchases. If I have made one purchase online, or over the telephone, the person at the other end has enough information to buy anything on my card. If I had been issued with a list of "use once" codes these transactions would be much more secure.
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