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Topic Title: Airfield Lighting
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Created On: 30 June 2007 03:42 PM
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 30 June 2007 03:42 PM
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ant1981

Posts: 46
Joined: 25 June 2006

Ok, here's a question, does anyone know if there are forums for Airfield Lighting electrical systems?
 02 July 2007 01:26 PM
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OMS

Posts: 19623
Joined: 23 March 2004

As part of my apprenticeship - before Pontius was the pilot - I did airfield lighting.




Not certain if there are fora specifically for airfield lighting - last one I worked on had lots of buried 11kV transformers along with other interesting items

Regards

OMS

-------------------------
Failure is always an option
 09 July 2007 10:58 PM
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AncientMariner

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For starters, runway lighting tends to be a MV/HV series system with each lamp being fed from its own transformer, ie all the transformer primaries in series. Thus should/when a lamp fails the rest will stay burning. This technique is to give eqal brilliance, otherwise due to the lengths of cable involved those at the far end of the runway would suffer excessive voltage drop and run dimmer.

-------------------------
Clive S Carver GCGI IEng MIET
 11 July 2007 04:19 PM
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deleted_maxmk

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Joined: 11 July 2007

Interesting, Can anybody share their experience in Airfield Lighting Control Systems?
 17 July 2007 12:05 AM
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deleted_wrightyred

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Joined: 16 July 2007

Hello All

I am new and hopefully can answer some of your questions...... AncientMariner
is correct Airfield lighting is around 2000v primary to around 30v secondary on a constant current circuit of 6.6A. Any other questions please ask away and I will try and answer.....
maxmk As far as control systems go there are many out there from Alstom to avionic servises only a few and accepted from the CAA.

Wrightyred.
 17 July 2007 10:18 PM
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ant1981

Posts: 46
Joined: 25 June 2006

With regards to controls, there are a few standards currently used.

Modular Control Systems, old but reliable, basically relays to switch on contactors to fire up those constant current regulators and also the latest is using PLC's. Most military are still on the former, a few on the latter and most commercial are on the latter also.
 24 August 2007 10:37 AM
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roxcyborg

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hello all,

I am a fresher, and have jst eneterd into the field of Airfield ground lighting. I would really like to know about the latest and most advanced control systems in airfield lighting and also the core facts that one should know abt the airfield lighting. I hope i'll get to knjow a lot by you elite people..!!
 14 September 2007 05:41 PM
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ant1981

Posts: 46
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If you have just entered this field, then your best way to learn will be by learning on the airfield of which you are placed on and the information from the courses for the AGL side and control side.

Of course, any questions, I'll do my best.
 12 November 2007 06:27 PM
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ant1981

Posts: 46
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Roxcyborg, how are you getting on with the airfield lighting?

Edited: 12 November 2007 at 06:28 PM by ant1981
 14 November 2007 04:27 PM
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VE

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I'm currently managing the implementation of a CAT III AGL installation for a new airport in the Middle East, any questions I'll be happy to contribute.
 27 November 2007 03:10 PM
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ant1981

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VE, do you think that the method of joining TISE and TSR transformers is dated and could be improved? Even though the polymer heatshrink is the standard method of an AGL joint, I feel that it is a major contributor to the destruction of insulation resistance of an AGL circuit.

I've often found that on an old circuit with a poor reading, not only new joints, but new transformers are a big help. They may not get you a high reading, but they certainly get the reading out of the 'safety switch off' zone.
 11 December 2007 05:10 PM
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chadwinp

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Re the jointing kits, the FAA style connectors are probably more common overseas but the crimp & heat shrink is probably a better joint in the long term provided you use the HS sleeves with the adhesive and ALSO the heat melt tape. A standard HS is not good enough - Paul Chadwin, Thorn Airfield Lighting UK Ltd
 11 December 2007 07:22 PM
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ant1981

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Paul, thanks for the information. I'll take a look into that. Currently what is generally used so far as I can see on the military front, is just the crimp and shrink alone. Some are using self amalgamating tape over the ends to finish off. It seems to be the DE standard.

But the struggle is, convincing whom is paying, that there is a better option, at cost.
 12 December 2007 07:36 AM
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chadwinp

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It's not only a DE standard, BAA use the same method for jointing (also on the secondary). The saving is not having to replace the isolating transformers, the water gets into the primary cable and is pulled into the transformer core. This rusts & expands and then the whole lot bursts open. You can also feel the water in the cable. I believe Sigmaform (excuse the spelling) used to be DE approved.
 23 December 2007 01:45 PM
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ant1981

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I'm very interested to see how the BAA standards differ from DE standards, as currently I'm only working to DE policy. It would be interesting to see where I can go in my career.

So to clarify, where you say 'The saving is not having to replace the isolating transformers, the water gets into the primary cable and is pulled into the transformer core.' Are you referring to heat melt tape with the adhesive heatshrink prevents the problem you outlined? So without the heat melt, the problem can occur with only an adhesive heat shrink?

To make a better joint, I've only had self amalgamating tape to put round the ends of my adhesive heat shrinks.
 09 January 2008 03:33 PM
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chadwinp

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Yes, the heat melt tape seals the cores of the cable and prevents the moisture being sucked down into the core. Self amalgamating tape will also help BUT it should be additional not instead of.
 09 January 2008 06:20 PM
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ant1981

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I'll bear that in mind. The problem we're faced with is working for companies that don't wish to spend money.
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