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Topic Title: Misuse of term 'ENGINEER'
Topic Summary: 'Engineer' Profession and Title
Created On: 01 November 2007 09:34 AM
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 17 March 2010 11:45 AM
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westonpa

Posts: 1771
Joined: 10 October 2007

And possibly technician.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/8570244.stm

Regards.
 20 October 2010 05:45 PM
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dvaidr

Posts: 519
Joined: 08 June 2003

I say there should be Engineer and Enjuneer. Engineer = anyone practising Engineering; Enjuneer = Anyone practising enjuneering.

The problem is that I've come across many CEng/IEng's who try practice enjuneering on a daily basis. These people work to a low standard which they continually fail to meet.

I've met many Engineers with few qualiifcations who are very very good.
 12 December 2010 03:52 PM
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Sammuel

Posts: 2
Joined: 24 November 2003

Engineers apply science and/or technology to solve business and technical challenges. In today's world an engineer should have a balance of both academic qualifications and practical work experience. It is this balance that is needed to produce a competent professional engineer.

Of late the term engineer has widened to include technology practioners and professionals. This has not diluted the requirement for a balance between qualifications, on the job training and practical work experience.

Sam J. Ifeacho
Management Consultant
Deloitte
 12 December 2010 10:28 PM
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gkenyon

Posts: 4490
Joined: 06 May 2002

Originally posted by: Sammuel

Engineers apply science and/or technology to solve business and technical challenges. In today's world an engineer should have a balance of both academic qualifications and practical work experience. It is this balance that is needed to produce a competent professional engineer.
And a little of something else - a mixture of "artist" and "innovator", added to the above.

Simply knowing what's gone before, and the theory, doesn't really provide the whole story. Maybe another two words that help define, are "pioneering" and "innovation" ?

-------------------------
Eur Ing Graham Kenyon CEng MIET TechIOSH
 14 December 2010 11:18 AM
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mbirdi

Posts: 1907
Joined: 13 June 2005

Originally posted by: gkenyon
And a little of something else - a mixture of "artist" and "innovator", added to the above.

It does make me wonder why Engineers don't get the same kind of recognition like Artists such as Damien Hirst and Tracy Emin? Could the reason have anything to do with the professional code of conduct that influences Engineers to not indulge in their success as this would be seen to be vulgar?

If the IET were an artistic based organisation where the likes of Damien Hirst were in the BoT. Would they be participating with the rest of us in the forums? And is the lack of participation by the BoT an indication that my first reply is true?

Whilst engineers desire recognition for their success, they appear to be trained or conditioned not to go out and actively seek it. Therefore lack of public recognition has got nothing to do with it and that we are our own worst enemies.

Originally posted by: gkenyon
Simply knowing what's gone before, and the theory, doesn't really provide the whole story. Maybe another two words that help define, are "pioneering" and "innovation" ?

See my reply earlier.
 14 December 2010 12:30 PM
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DavidParr

Posts: 242
Joined: 19 April 2002

Originally posted by: mbirdi
It does make me wonder why Engineers don't get the same kind of recognition like Artists such as Damien Hirst and Tracy Emin? Could the reason have anything to do with the professional code of conduct that influences Engineers to not indulge in their success as this would be seen to be vulgar?
......
Whilst engineers desire recognition for their success, they appear to be trained or conditioned not to go out and actively seek it. Therefore lack of public recognition has got nothing to do with it and that we are our own worst enemies.


I think lack of recognition is at least partly due to the huge effort involved in translating what we all do into something understandable to non-engineers! After all, Engineers just use spanners don't we?!!

Joking apart, it is an issue because it has led to reduced monetry rewards for all of us, (only partly made up for by job satisfaction!).

-------------------------
David Parr BSc.CEng MIET
PRA
 14 December 2010 12:42 PM
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StewartTaylor

Posts: 100
Joined: 18 January 2003

Without wishing to divert this discussion into the field of remuneration, I think there is an element of the red herring in David's last comment, since many of the professions with which we make comparisons largely consist of self-employed practitioners whereas the majority of engineers are employed staff.

I work in an industry where many of the engineers are self-employed contractors and the headline hourly rates for these guys are way above normal salary rates - but they refelect the total cost of employment, unlike your or my salary.

-------------------------
Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away.
IET » Savoy Place Virtual Club » Misuse of term 'ENGINEER'

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