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Topic Title: IET in an independent Scotland
Topic Summary: If Scotland becomes independent how will the IET position itself
Created On: 12 May 2013 04:18 PM
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 12 May 2013 04:18 PM
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garethwood

Posts: 43
Joined: 07 July 2003

A question aimed at our Scottish membership. If Scotland becomes an independent country outside of the Union; how will this affect the mandate of the IET?
 12 May 2013 04:42 PM
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MosheW

Posts: 192
Joined: 14 April 2013

I think there are number of options.
One of them is to form their own Institute - just like Ireland does. - Engineers Ireland
So the same can be done - Engineers Scotland?
The Institution of Engineers of Scotland.


Close ties can exist and agreements between ES and IET.

http://www.engineersireland.ie/Membership/Why-Join.aspx

Edited: 12 May 2013 at 05:01 PM by MosheW
 13 May 2013 12:03 PM
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amillar

Posts: 1918
Joined: 28 May 2002

I would have thought that the IETs view would be that it has no effect on its mandate - it is an international organisation which happens to have its HQ in the UK and happens to award UK Engineering Council certifications.

The point probably should be: what effect it would have on the mandate of the UK Engineering Council.

-------------------------
Andy Millar CEng MIET CMgr MCMI

http://www.linkedin.com/in/millarandy

"The aim of argument, or of discussion, should not be victory, but progress." Joseph Joubert
 30 May 2013 04:59 PM
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CelticHeathen

Posts: 46
Joined: 10 December 2012

Originally posted by: amillar

I would have thought that the IETs view would be that it has no effect on its mandate - it is an international organisation which happens to have its HQ in the UK and happens to award UK Engineering Council certifications.

The point probably should be: what effect it would have on the mandate of the UK Engineering Council.


I would argue that engineering as a whole is in a far stronger position in Scotland than in England (and with its potential in Renewables and Tidal/Wave energy, the future looks bright), so I see no reason why they couldn't get their act together.

We shall see...
 08 August 2013 02:44 PM
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faramog

Posts: 447
Joined: 25 November 2002

How would it be positioned .... south of the border I assume !!

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Eur Ing Graham Prebble CEng MIEE
 11 August 2013 09:34 AM
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ArthurHall

Posts: 737
Joined: 25 July 2008

I understood that the IET were already changing so that all IET functions in Scotland were managed in Scotland if that is the case it would be a simple matter for IET Scotland to carry on as a national rather than regional body, no real change.
 05 October 2013 11:24 PM
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kengreen

Posts: 400
Joined: 15 April 2013

I cannot think of a better adjective to apply to the above posts than "tripe".

What on earth is there to make Scotland a special case? As a start what are the propositions for financing a separate Scottish organisation? In debates of this sort it is absolutely essential to be practical.

What essential facilities could be available which are not already available from the IET?. Engineering is not bounded by political ambitions.

Ken Green

Ken Green
 24 February 2014 05:42 PM
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garethwood

Posts: 43
Joined: 07 July 2003

Ken, it was a very apt comment especially given the circumstances of Scottish independence at present. As a separate country it would not be necessarily be bound by the UK Engineering council and could in fact go its own route.
 24 February 2014 06:03 PM
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garethwood

Posts: 43
Joined: 07 July 2003

Thanks Moshe. Yes indeed the Irish seem to have a regulated profession which is acknowledged here in North America, whereas the IET doesn't have those reciprocal agreements in place. My original question, albeit made 11 years ago, was made to provoke some thought on Scottish Independence and its impacts to the IET and as correctly pointed out the Engineering Council (UK).

If Scotland did become independent it could certainly entertain a regulated profession under a new Scottish act of law, which in turn would be wholly beneficial to its economy.
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