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Topic Title: Jaguar Jet Car Specs
Topic Summary: More road realistic specifications recommended
Created On: 16 February 2011 05:33 PM
Status: Read Only
Related E&T article: Jaguar's jet-powered car
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 16 February 2011 05:33 PM
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quantium

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I don't know what the production models would cost, but I would have thought it more sensible to have cheaper cars that have a top speed nearer the legal limit, and an acceleration nearer that of average cars.

The idea of an electric motor on each wheel is excellent as it cuts the moving parts to a minimum, as is the silent turbine and switched reluctance generator. But why have two?
 16 February 2011 06:29 PM
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diviner

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Originally posted by: quantium

... I would have thought it more sensible to have cheaper cars that have a top speed nearer the legal limit, and an acceleration nearer that of average cars.


The legal limit for which country? Please bear in mind that in parts of Germany, India, the Isle of Man and (according to Wikipedia) Venezuela the only hard speed limit applicable is the one at around 1 billion kilometers per hour that is imposed by conventional physics, and in other countries "the legal limit" varies between about 80 and 140 kilometers per hour. Should manufacturers produce different models depending where the vehicle is going to be sold? Or depending on which countries the car will ever be used in?

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Ian Gordon, MIET CITP MBCS
 16 February 2011 10:34 PM
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quantium

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There could be a speed governor to suit individual countries if it could be overriden in an overtaking emergency. If this was by really hard pressure on the throttle then it would be too uncomfortable to drive at such speeds all the time.

However my point remains that a turbine-electric vehicle with more normal performance at half the price would probably sell more units.

Anyone who saw the recent Horizon program on road deaths (a million every year worldwide), and engineering methods of reducing them, may think again about driving at 204 mi/hr on a public road in a nearly silent, low profile, car painted in a similar colour to the road surface.
Click here to see the programme
 17 February 2011 07:10 PM
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diviner

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But how would you then police the process of getting the governor adjusted if a driver from a country with a low maximum limit is going to be visiting a country with a significantly higher limit for a time before returning to their own country?

What about the issue of buying a car, possibly second-hand, in one country and then wanting to use it permanently in another?

However, I agree with your point about a vehicle with more normal performance - there has to be a limit beyond which manufacturers do not go, I just think that, for a number of reasons (including that given above) "the national speed limit in the country of sale" is the wrong place to set it.

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Ian Gordon, MIET CITP MBCS
 17 February 2011 08:10 PM
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rbp28668

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It's basically a show car I think. May be practical, maybe not! I was surprised about the fuss made around the small turbine as by some standards, it's quite big. For example see JetCat P20 - 5lbs thrust at 245,000 rpm. Would have thought the real engineering problem is the system integration so that the power is harnessed effectively - which they rather skate over.
 17 February 2011 10:39 PM
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quantium

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It would simply be an offence to use the car with the governor improperly set, and it could invalidate any claim the driver may make on his own insurance. These governors would not influence any determined law breaker, but would help ordinary drivers to keep within speed limits.

A mass produced car with an electric motor on each wheel and a central engine, running at constant speed and efficiency, to charge batteries could be environmentally friendly to run, cheap to service, and long lasting. This is what is needed to be encouraged.

I supposed the show racing cars like this Jag and the Tesla are a publicity stunt to get past the milk float image. But a vehicle that is practical to own is what may go part the way to solve the environmental problems.

The other part is for government and institutions to consider "people miles" and realise that the other person's journeys that they may be demanding or encouraging, added up over the whole world, has an environmental impact far greater than say remote control standby consumption of tv sets.

 18 February 2011 08:18 PM
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diviner

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Originally posted by: quantium

It would simply be an offence to use the car with the governor improperly set,


Meaning that either there would be HUGE queues at border crossings for people to get their limiters reset or people who lived in one country and regularly traveled to another with a different speed limit would have to have their car set for the lower limit always. Ditto for states within countries.

In the former case, who would pay for the repeated resetting? I'll happily undergo it for my cars IF AND ONLY IF YOU pay for my time and the technician's. (Being a mathematician by training, I use the phrase "IF AND ONLY IF" in its precise mathematical meaning, which is not significantly different from its plain English meaning.)

These governors would not influence any determined law breaker, but would help ordinary drivers to keep within speed limits.


I find that the Mark I Human Brain is more than sufficient for this task. A large number of people of my acquaintance would go further and say that anyone whose Mark I Human Brain is not sufficient to the task should be required by law to surrender either their Mark I Human Brain or their driving license.

But a vehicle that is practical to own is what may go part the way to solve the environmental problems.


And part of being a "practical vehicle to own" means that the vehicle can, as supplied, be safely and conveniently driven at or close to the legal limit for whatever country the driver happens to be in today, without requiring repeated visits to a technician for adjustment, possibly multiple times in a single journey.

The other part is for government and institutions to consider "people miles" and realise that the other person's journeys that they may be demanding or encouraging, added up over the whole world, has an environmental impact far greater than say remote control standby consumption of tv sets.


This I agree with. And the right place to start this is to stop politicians flying half way round the world to shake hands, chat, have a banquet, etc. just to have a discussion that could just as well have taken place via teleconferencing. (Although some figures I read would imply that sticking a cork in every active volcano would reduce worldwide greenhouse gases more than totally banning air travel would - not that I am suggesting anyone go out and by a cork oak forest!!!)

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Ian Gordon, MIET CITP MBCS
 19 February 2011 10:58 AM
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quantium

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Originally posted by: diviner
Originally posted by: quantium It would simply be an offence to use the car with the governor improperly set,
Meaning that either there would be HUGE queues at border crossings for people to get their limiters reset or people who lived in one country and regularly traveled to another with a different speed limit would have to have their car set for the lower limit always. Ditto for states within countries.
That assumes that drivers cannot set it themselves. They are required to set their throttles at the correct speed all the time, so why not require them to set these controls just once? I just hope that those in authority don't read this thread and lick their lips at the thought of these huge queues and their power to make this happen.
The idea could be expanded further by using the technology that speed camera detectors use to find speed limits, and set the limiters automatically.
 19 February 2011 01:52 PM
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diviner

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Originally posted by: quantium

That assumes that drivers cannot set it themselves. They are required to set their throttles at the correct speed all the time, so why not require them to set these controls just once?


You have a point. That would work. To a point. But how would you then detect someone who committed your proposed offense of having the limiter set wrongly, if the driver used the older Mark I Human Brain to keep their speed below the local limit?

The idea could be expanded further by using the technology that speed camera detectors use to find speed limits, and set the limiters automatically.


That wouldn't work. Speed camera detectors are either radar detectors (no information of the actual speed limit in the radar emissions), laser detectors (no actual information of the actual speed limit in the laser emissions) or GPS receivers with built-in databases (there are places I have driven regularly where you get a 70 limit and a 30 limit on parallel roads separated by less than the accuracy of a GPS fix.

Unless we went to the economy-crippling expense of installing some form of electronically readable "signage" along every road in the UK - and bear in mind that in some places that "signage" would have to be dynamic because there are places where the speed limit can change from minute to minute - I was once on the western arc of the M25 and saw the speed limit at a particular gantry ahead of me change from 60 to 70 to 40 in the space of a minute.

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Ian Gordon, MIET CITP MBCS
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