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Topic Title: Reducing Harmonics from Inverter Drive
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Created On: 18 February 2014 08:47 PM
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 18 February 2014 08:47 PM
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thaiffer

Posts: 2
Joined: 18 February 2014

By reducing the harmonics caused by using an inverter to control a motor can I reduce my electricity bill?
 19 February 2014 03:36 PM
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Dtw21

Posts: 27
Joined: 22 February 2013

How do you think this will save you money?
 24 February 2014 08:59 PM
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adamtaylor

Posts: 54
Joined: 08 December 2009

I believe this video on harmonics may be of some interest to you...

http://www.quantum-controls.co.uk/harmonic-surveys.html

-------------------------
Fail to prepare...Prepare to fail!

Adam
 24 February 2014 10:29 PM
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thaiffer

Posts: 2
Joined: 18 February 2014

Originally posted by: Dtw21

How do you think this will save you money?


My understanding is that if you reduced the harmonics you would reduce the current drawn by the drive therefore the electricity cost would be less? Or am I missing to understand something correctly?
 15 March 2014 06:03 PM
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adamtaylor

Posts: 54
Joined: 08 December 2009

I believe there is a possibility of saving money by reducing the harmonics, if the non-linear load on a electrical system is high (e.g. exceeds 15% of the total load???).
Due to high harmonics increasing the operating current and voltage on the system, this can cause possible damage on the network. This then can mean that items on the system can be overloaded and create huge amounts of heat. Therefore, this heat can cause the system to use more and then have to pay for more kWH.
This effect can also shorten the life expectancy of the equipment and cost money to either repair or replace it.

-------------------------
Fail to prepare...Prepare to fail!

Adam
 30 March 2014 02:54 PM
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tonyfisher123

Posts: 5
Joined: 25 July 2008

This seems to be a case where different circumstances could give different outcomes. Two such are:

1. You are on a "small" installation (e.g. domestic). In this case you are charged only for kWh consumed, and since the harmonics do not contribute to the kW loading, you will not be charged for them. "Disposing" of the harmonics then becomes "somebody else's problem". There is still a potential problem if the electricity meter does not record correctly with a distorted (harmonic-containing) current waveform.

2. In a larger installation (e.g. industrial) you may also be paying a kVA maximum-demand charge in addition to the kWh charges. In this case, because the harmonics will increase the measured current, and hence the kVA, you will have to pay for this. Eliminating the harmonics would then save money.

Hope this throws some light on the problem.
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