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Topic Title: Iran's renewable energy sector poised for growth
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Created On: 27 July 2013 06:24 PM
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 27 July 2013 06:24 PM
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jarathoon

Posts: 1040
Joined: 05 September 2004

"Renewable energy use in Iran is still below 1% of the country's entire energy demand. According to the fifth Five-Year Plan, the use of renewable energy should increase to 1.5% of the country's energy mix by March 2016. Power obtained from renewable energy sources is purchased through a 20-year Power Purchase Agreement signed with the government. However, external sanctions have slowed down foreign investment and the development of renewable energy."

http://www.tehrantimes.com/eco...tor-poised-for-growth

Since we are moving to an energy system involving 20 year or more agreements with the UK government, perhaps we should invite Iranian energy experts to speak in the UK on this to advise us.

With Iranian Engineers having to cope with the restrictions imposed on them by sanctions, the fact that they don't have access to international capital may help them in being creative as engineers in getting more for less.

As far as I am aware the now counter-productive sanctions do not apply to engineers communicating for the wider benefit of humanity.

James Arathoon

(Declaration of Interest: I have never visited Iran and have no financial interests in Iran, however my grandmother was born in Isfahan, Iran, and she and my grandfather were married in a Roman Catholic Church in that same city. I have never had to state this in a job application for discrimination purposes, although for some reason I have had to explicitly state where my mother was born (Rawalpindi, Pakistan) when applying for example to the UK Meteological Office for a job/sponsorship when a student many years ago. )



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James Arathoon
 02 August 2013 11:44 AM
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jencam

Posts: 608
Joined: 06 May 2007

Originally posted by: jarathoon
"Renewable energy use in Iran is still below 1% of the country's entire energy demand.


My son has visited Iran where he found out that renewable energy is very underdeveloped because apart from solar the country does not have the required natural resources. Iran isn't very windy and there are no facilities for tidal or hydroelectric power stations. This is the reason why the country has a nuclear programme as part of an initiative to reduce consumption of fossil fuels.

Since we are moving to an energy system involving 20 year or more agreements with the UK government, perhaps we should invite Iranian energy experts to speak in the UK on this to advise us.


If it wasn't for the stupid and puerile behaviour of William Hague a few years ago as he tried to appease the US, Israel, and the Daily Mail following the storming of the British embassy in Iran by a mob then such an event would almost certainly be possible. IMO he is an unprofessional and not particularly competent Foreign Secretary.

With Iranian Engineers having to cope with the restrictions imposed on them by sanctions, the fact that they don't have access to international capital may help them in being creative as engineers in getting more for less.


My son absolutely agrees with this. The sanctions have actually helped Iran develop engineering industries through the creativity and ingenuity of its engineers. This is in sharp contrast to the UK which has entered lazy mode by preferring to import its engineering solutions and offshore development to where wages are the cheapest. It also raises questions whether protectionism of industry is anywhere near as bad as the west makes it out to be.
 02 August 2013 03:32 PM
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jarathoon

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jencam,

Ever since the US managed to get sack Jack Straw sacked as Foreign Secretary, it has been clear that the US has a veto on our foreign policy.

So what ever you think of William Hague and the Foreign Office, it would be nice to know the difference between what they would like to say and what the US Ambassador allows them to say.

Now apparently

"Foreign Secretary says UK open to better relations with Iran on a step-by-step and reciprocal basis."

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/foreign-secretary-speaks-to-iranian-foreign-minister

"The Foreign Secretary reiterated the need for urgent progress to resolve the international community's concerns about Iran's nuclear programme. He made clear that the UK was open to improvements in the bilateral relationship with Iran, on a step-by-step and reciprocal basis."

As you may know I really want to resolve some quite straight forward engineering concerns I have regarding the UK's future nuclear programmes, particularly on how SME's can communicate with government in regards to fourth generation nuclear development. However it is clear to everyone that DECC are completely out of their depth on this, and don't even have a coherent statement on what has to be a policy of Third Generation Nuclear at any cost, so EDF is guaranteed a 10% return no matter what it plans or how incompetently it acts.

If the UK government don't even have the competence to understand and clearly state a UK a sensible UK nuclear policy how can we have any confidence that they can understand another countries needs and plans in regards to nuclear power.

David Mackay the Chief Scientific Advisor to DECC (one of the few people in DECC I have any respect for) has to state the UK nuclear policy and then waste time and his own reputation accounting for its inconsistency and inadequacy.

Like a plan to produce MOX fuel, without a credible plan or the skills necessary to build a MOX plant, let alone plans for Nuclear power stations that can burn MOX fuel. Like plans for a waste depository without any there being any county in the UK willing to even consider hosting it. I could go on and on. We need to get our clarity of purpose and transparency improved, before demanding the same from others.

I would have liked to have seen just one word from the Foreign Secretary distancing the UK from the unfortunately timed US policy of ratcheting up Iranian sanctions just as Iran vote's in a new president.

It is just strikes me as arrogant, and disrespectful of basic human norms and manners, for the USA to attempt to burn new diplomatic bridges for no good reason prior to even hearing from the new president; especially given that the majority of Iranians alive today were born after the 1979 Iranian Revolution and Embassy Crisis.

Perhaps it is not just GCHQ that is receiving secret brown envelopes from the American's, but their political masters in Whitehall as well.

James Arathoon

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James Arathoon
 04 August 2013 12:28 PM
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westonpa

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Originally posted by: jencam
If it wasn't for the stupid and puerile behaviour of William Hague a few years ago as he tried to appease the US, Israel, and the Daily Mail following the storming of the British embassy in Iran by a mob then such an event would almost certainly be possible. IMO he is an unprofessional and not particularly competent Foreign Secretary.

I could not agree more. He has done a lot of damage to our interests abroad. However, the previous government did a lot as well. Maybe we need to get some engineers into politics.

Regards.
 05 August 2013 12:41 PM
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jencam

Posts: 608
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Originally posted by: jarathoon
Ever since the US managed to get sack Jack Straw sacked as Foreign Secretary, it has been clear that the US has a veto on our foreign policy.


The US has assumed the right to dictate British foreign policy ever since the day when Churchill and Roosevelt met on the USS Augusta.

So what ever you think of William Hague and the Foreign Office, it would be nice to know the difference between what they would like to say and what the US Ambassador allows them to say.


A strong foreign secretary has the courage to stick his foot down and stand up to British interests rather than those of Uncle Sam. Being a friend is not the same thing as being a lackey.

"Foreign Secretary says UK open to better relations with Iran on a step-by-step and reciprocal basis."

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/foreign-secretary-speaks-to-iranian-foreign-minister


"The Foreign Secretary reiterated the need for urgent progress to resolve the international community's concerns about Iran's nuclear programme. He made clear that the UK was open to improvements in the bilateral relationship with Iran, on a step-by-step and reciprocal basis."

William Hague has probably realised that he has behaved in a reactionary and unprofessional way and has to start making mends.

I would have liked to have seen just one word from the Foreign Secretary distancing the UK from the unfortunately timed US policy of ratcheting up Iranian sanctions just as Iran vote's in a new president.

It is just strikes me as arrogant, and disrespectful of basic human norms and manners, for the USA to attempt to burn new diplomatic bridges for no good reason prior to even hearing from the new president; especially given that the majority of Iranians alive today were born after the 1979 Iranian Revolution and Embassy Crisis.


You also have to take into account the influence of Israel in the relationship between the US and Iran.
 05 August 2013 10:14 PM
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westonpa

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Let's be honest if we want to get some business in Iran we would be better to send in Jeremy Clarkson, he's more popular and respected there than our Foreign Secretary.

Regards.
 06 August 2013 12:28 AM
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jarathoon

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Originally posted by: westonpa

Let's be honest if we want to get some business in Iran we would be better to send in Jeremy Clarkson, he's more popular and respected there than our Foreign Secretary.



Regards.


Initially confused by your post but now found the BBC story you refer to...

"Top Gear in Iran: Why do Iranians love Jeremy Clarkson?"

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-22020822

It would be quite a funny if Clarkson took green energy, health and safety and satire to Iran to help solve the diplomatic impasse.

I don't think renewable energy equipment, health and safety or satire are in the iranian sanctions list...However he has to weigh up the risks for himself, the government cannot assist him in doing this.

Embargoes and sanctions on Iran

https://www.gov.uk/sanctions-on-iran

"The UK government does not encourage trade with, or investment in, Iran and has withdrawn all commercial support for trade. If you decide to trade with Iran, you do so at your own risk. Having weighed up the risks, the final decision on whether to trade with Iran lies with you. However, if your business dealings get into trouble, the government will not be able to assist."

James Arathoon

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James Arathoon
 06 August 2013 12:37 AM
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jarathoon

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It appears the BBC has its own separate sanctions list that rules out a visit to Iran by the Top Gear Team...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-22020822


" "Iranian nukes can't be very advanced if this is their idea of car technology," he once said on air.

But Clarkson says he would welcome the chance to drive one in Iran.

"I'd love to drive through Iran in one of those. It's the sort of thing that Top Gear is all about," he says.

"I'd love to take the show to Iran. We asked, we begged. And the (Iranian) ambassador in London was very sympathetic.

"At the time he had a son who was 14 or 15 years old who loved Top Gear but there is a rule in place that the BBC isn't allowed to go, so we weren't allowed, which is very sad - because we're not really very political."
"

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James Arathoon
 07 August 2013 02:25 PM
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jarathoon

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I note this story on Iran from September last year...

"Iranian university bans on women causes consternation"

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-19665615

"More than 30 universities have introduced new rules banning female students from almost 80 different degree courses.

These include a bewildering variety of subjects from engineering, nuclear physics and computer science, to English literature, archaeology and business."


The UK still suffers under the last vestiges of our colonial systems of discrimination that effectively barred women and ethnic minorities from our now moribund nuclear industry. This is not a good model for the Iranians to emulate.

James Arathoon

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James Arathoon
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