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Topic Title: Rubber Gloves Low Voltage
Topic Summary: Switch Rooms
Created On: 18 January 2013 09:35 AM
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 18 January 2013 09:35 AM
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pbutts

Posts: 7
Joined: 20 January 2006

Does anyone know if there is a pair of rubber gloves on the market that would or could be used on low voltage switchgear in switch rooms.

We already have the gauntlet type.

My question is really does anyone know of a smaller type more benificial to electricians that are not so big and bulky.

I thought i saw an advert the other day for apprentices and the young lady apprentice had gloves on these may have been anti cut and general use but it just got me thinking again..

Help appreciated

P Butts
 18 January 2013 01:43 PM
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Dave69

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Joined: 16 July 2011

the first question has to be,,,, why do you need Electrical Safety Gloves?

If you are working on live equipment then your R A wil state what type of gloves and other PPE you need

The lightest duty ones are still 1/2 mm thick and they are only class 00 rated up to only 500 volts, no good if you are trying to do up small nuts and bolts.
 28 January 2013 05:28 PM
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phow

Posts: 69
Joined: 14 April 2002

Agree with Dave. No need for rubber gloves (on large indusrtial site), - didn't have any. Gloves are PPE and as such a last resort in the hierachy of safety. You are "testing" on IP2X control gear with safety insulated tools, or working dead. Switching on /off is by an approved switch.
[sorry I think we had one pair somewhere for an emergency, but was never used & how do you test them?]
regards
Peter
 28 January 2013 06:03 PM
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Dave69

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Originally posted by: phow


[sorry I think we had one pair somewhere for an emergency, but was never used & how do you test them?]

regards

Peter


well you can send your gloves away to be tested of if you are only using class 0 and I think class 00 you can just carry out a pneumatic test, blow them up and see if they leak, but if you are really working on live equipment would you wanna trust a "Pneumatic glove tester".

How much is your life worth? for the sake of 25 quid you can buy a brand new pair c/w certs. I still think the bottom line is dont do "Live Work" unless of course you are being well paid to do it
 28 January 2013 11:42 PM
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alancapon

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Originally posted by: phow
. . . I think we had one pair somewhere for an emergency, but was never used & how do you test them? . . .

I agree. There should be no need to use them on an industrial site, except as a last resort, following a risk assessment.

Things are slightly different in the Electricity Supply Industry, where they are worn as a matter of course during some works, but we are trained to work live, and have a suite of live working procedures. We use bi-colour gloves - my LV ones have a yellow outer and a red inner. They are sent away annually for retest, and I carry out an "inflation test" before and after each use, looking for traces of red rubber showing through the red, and listening at the fingers for pin holes. They are then stored in a light-proof box

Regards,

Alan.
 28 January 2013 11:45 PM
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alancapon

Posts: 5746
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Originally posted by: Dave69
. . . The lightest duty ones are still 1/2 mm thick and they are only class 00 rated up to only 500 volts, no good if you are trying to do up small nuts and bolts.

If you think they are bad, you should try working in Class 2s!

Regards,

Alan.
 29 January 2013 01:01 PM
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broadgage

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As others post, insulating gloves are unlikely to be needed for normal working on modern equipment.
Some tests need to be done live, with suitable tools and test gear, for most other work the equipment should be made dead.

In my view though it is prudent to keep an in date pair of insulating gloves to hand for emergencies.
Last time I used mine was to pull the cut out fuse for an installation that was water damaged. Did not fancy touching the wet cut out otherwise.

If the risk is not electric shock but arc flash/burns then insulating gloves are unsuitable as they may melt and cause severe burns.
Fire resistant leather or nomex gloves are better in such cases.
 31 January 2013 09:17 PM
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slittle

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I keep a pair of class 0 (1000v) ones on the truck for those moments when....... They've got the leather covers on too which are great from a protecting the gloves point of view but unless if you want to do anything fine whilst wearing them.

A spare set of leather covers are really handy when trying to give the cat worming pills too as they are long enough to keep his claws at bay


Stu
 14 March 2013 02:34 PM
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subaqua

Posts: 65
Joined: 25 July 2008

Originally posted by: slittle

I keep a pair of class 0 (1000v) ones on the truck for those moments when....... They've got the leather covers on too which are great from a protecting the gloves point of view but unless if you want to do anything fine whilst wearing them.



A spare set of leather covers are really handy when trying to give the cat worming pills too as they are long enough to keep his claws at bay

i wish there was a like button for posts as good as this





Stu
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