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Topic Title: Overheating in substations
Topic Summary: Substations
Created On: 15 July 2012 07:23 AM
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 15 July 2012 07:23 AM
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adamtaylor

Posts: 54
Joined: 08 December 2009

Hi all,

Our site currently as several substations that over heat.

We are going to cool the substations down using some kind of method, but wondered what other personal had come across.
Bearing in mind our substations are in a dusty environment, so drawing cold air from the outside is a no go.

Thanks in advance,

-------------------------
Fail to prepare...Prepare to fail!

Adam
 15 July 2012 02:45 PM
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alancapon

Posts: 5763
Joined: 27 December 2005

If you cannot use forced ventilation of air from outside, then about the only option you have is a heat pump arrangement to transfer the heat to the outside.

Regards,

Alan.
 15 July 2012 08:31 PM
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ADJONES

Posts: 31
Joined: 15 November 2002

Have you checked what controls are fitted to the switchroom heaters, panel heaters, anti-condensation heaters etc - it might be possible to remove some of the heat at source.
 15 July 2012 08:40 PM
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JohnRRussell

Posts: 22
Joined: 02 December 2003

Closed circuit water cooling, as in cooling generators? Air/water head exchangers on the inside and fin-fan coolers on the outside.
 16 July 2012 11:42 PM
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dlane

Posts: 690
Joined: 28 September 2007

Hi Adam,

Firsty, you may want to consider moving this to the wiring regs or energy forum where you may get a better response.

For my experience, in dusty environments I have seen a positive air pressure system installed in switchrooms that maintains a slightly higher pressure in the switchroom to help keep dust ingress to a minimum.

I have then seen these supplemented with a circulating air conditioning system to cool the air within the switchroom.

The other factor to look at is to reduce the heat at source if possible such as deloading or increasing power factor if applicable.

Kind regards

Donald Lane.
 20 July 2012 03:33 PM
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adamtaylor

Posts: 54
Joined: 08 December 2009

Originally posted by: alancapon

If you cannot use forced ventilation of air from outside, then about the only option you have is a heat pump arrangement to transfer the heat to the outside.



Regards,



Alan.


Hi Alan,

We are currently using this method on one of our more hotter substations and all though it cools the sub down, its still quite hot.

Thanks

-------------------------
Fail to prepare...Prepare to fail!

Adam
 20 July 2012 03:35 PM
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adamtaylor

Posts: 54
Joined: 08 December 2009

Originally posted by: JohnRRussell

Closed circuit water cooling, as in cooling generators? Air/water head exchangers on the inside and fin-fan coolers on the outside.


This seems to be quite a good idea, have you personally experienced this in any substations youve been in?

Thanks

-------------------------
Fail to prepare...Prepare to fail!

Adam
 23 July 2012 02:36 PM
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Avatar for OMS.
OMS

Posts: 19628
Joined: 23 March 2004

We are currently using this method on one of our more hotter substations and all though it cools the sub down, its still quite hot.


It's undersized then !! - and I guess you need to contrast "quite hot" with a particular operating temperature (and hence load)

I've used heat recovery heat pumps in parallel and triple arrangements (for redundancy) and they work fine - just be aware you are consuming about the same amount of energy in the heat pump as the combined transformer iron and copper losses.

I've also used ONW and OFW coolers on transformers where they had to be in enclosed bunkers (not UK) - no reported problems after 2 - 3 years in

Regards

OMS

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