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Topic Title: Electronics Engineers Who Cannot Solder?
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Created On: 09 November 2013 07:39 PM
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 15 March 2014 12:25 PM
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Zuiko

Posts: 521
Joined: 14 September 2010

Originally posted by: jencam


Very few people question the number of years children spend at school; whether this time is well spent learning useful stuff or whether children are just 'incarcerated' until they are old enough to work; or whether it would be better for them to start learning some trade and life skills at a younger age.



Is this a time warp back to the Victorain work houses?

As bad as government policy can get, I'm glad it will never get as bad as you would like it to be.

Children have got their entire adult lives to work


Incarcerated, with or without inverted commas (do you think doing that somehow softens the meaning?) is a wholly inappropriate word.
 15 March 2014 12:41 PM
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jencam

Posts: 608
Joined: 06 May 2007

Originally posted by: benmc
I did find when doing my electrical final year project the fact that it was electrical and a main work based, engineered project I didn't get marked as high as people who done very simple electronic projects such as a lock using flip flops.... simply for the fact the academic route love simulations, little electronic circuits because it appears more technical.... I am not moaning about my grade don't get me wrong but when the other guys in your class actually complain to you that you have been robbed and your project involved a hell of a lot more than theirs there is something wrong.


Didn't they say that getting the most for the least is a key to success in life?

Considerable variation in the complexity of undergraduate projects is something that my son has commented on. There are projects that contain material beyond his knowledge but there are also others that appear to be just too trivial. One such example was a race timer designed and constructed around half a dozen or so logic ICs. This was a project of A Level, or perhaps high end GCSE, standards but it resulted in the student graduating with an MEng 2.1. Yes, it was the student's SECOND project for the 4th year. If it was developed in the form of a programmable logic device using VHDL / Verilog then it possibly would have been suitable for a weaker student's BEng project, but in my son's opinion, it was a complete giveaway.

Projects around RF, precision analogue, physical level electronics, and anything heavily mathematical are generally more complicated and tougher to get working than projects that are largely digital or software based. It's plausible that a sizeable proportion of graduates with lower grades have more knowledge and experience of 'difficult' subjects than graduates with higher grades who have achieved them by taking the 'easy' subjects.

Originally posted by: seggysegaran
In the meantime, many lectures at Universities seem to have spent their entire time in acdemia and are not really familiar with the requirements of Electronic Product Design 'at the coal face'.


There is much truth to this. Lecturers who are theory heads are ten a penny but finding one who has years of experience of design and production engineering knowledge is like finding rhenium dust.

I have recently written a book called "From Prototype to Product - A Practical Guide for Electronic Engineers" covering the sort of information that is required to launch electronic products. Hope this is useful to graduates and SMEs alike.


My son would be very interested in reading it.
 16 March 2014 11:36 AM
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jencam

Posts: 608
Joined: 06 May 2007

Originally posted by: Zuiko
Is this a time warp back to the Victorain work houses?

As bad as government policy can get, I'm glad it will never get as bad as you would like it to be.

Children have got their entire adult lives to work


You misinterpreted my statements by miles. Where did I say anything about Victorian work houses?

I have a strong belief that kids should be allowed to be kids with the freedom to play and learn in the process. I object to their lives being bogged down with homework and school assignments to the point where they don't have the time and energy to do anything else just as much as being forced to scrub soot out of chimneys back in the 19th century. Numerous parents have told me that their children have far less time than they did to play, explore, study subjects outside of the school curriculum, visit places of interest, or participate in civic life.

There's a vast difference between learning trade skills (soldering included) and being employed in menial slave labour. You might not see it but I can. Educational critics argue than an excessively abstract secondary school curriculum isolated and detached from the real world will not adequately prepare children for the real world. Some children have already realised this - even as young as 10 - but others do not realise it until they become adults in their 30s or 40s. They question the utility of what they learned at school and whether it was really worth 5 years of their life.

Incarcerated, with or without inverted commas (do you think doing that somehow softens the meaning?) is a wholly inappropriate word.


What it basically means in this context is that children do not have the freedom to study subjects that interest them at a level commensurate with their academic ability; learn skills that will be useful in future life; and take examinations when they feel that they are ready for them. Instead they are forced to study the National Curriculum according to what the government wants for their age.
IET » Design and production engineering » Electronics Engineers Who Cannot Solder?

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