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Topic Title: Selling products to the United States
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Created On: 01 June 2013 10:12 AM
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 01 June 2013 10:12 AM
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jencam

Posts: 608
Joined: 06 May 2007

Every product designed by my son that has been sold commercially has NOT FOR SALE IN THE UNITED STATES printed on it and its documentation. This is intended as a get out clause to avoid being extradited and having to face the wrath of the US legal system if an American tries to sue him. Last year three British citizens - Christopher Tappin, Babar Ahmad, and Talha Ahsan - were extradited to the US under the controversial Extradition Act 2003.

If my son decides in the future to sell electronic products to the United States then does anybody have any advice or good sources of information about how to do it?
 02 June 2013 04:29 PM
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jarathoon

Posts: 1043
Joined: 05 September 2004

Department for Business, Innovation and Skills
enquiries@bis.gsi.gov.uk

If they do not answer your question the first time around then express your question in a slightly different way and email again. After one, two or three retries, they might start taking your questions seriously. It also helps to cc in your local mp.

or you could try

"UK Regional Export Finance Advisors"

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/uk-regional-export-finance-advisors

"UK Export Finance has appointed Regional Export Finance Advisers to help make our products and services more widely understood and accessible. They act as a point of contact locally to support both existing exporters and businesses with export potential by signposting them to banks, credit insurers, brokers, trade support bodies and sources of government support."

This was published on the 24 April 2013. Personally I have never found government appointed advisors very useful, especially when they have supply side sympathies (with its orthodox divide and conquer mentality), that doesn't help put you in touch with other companies experiencing the same sorts of problems.

Generally I think the government doesn't look at things from the perspective of the small businessman or businesswoman. I agree it would be nice to see government provide clear and transparent advice in respect of the full risk portfolio that the SME manufacturing sector face in exporting to the USA etc.

Statutory and Non-statutory business insurance for manufacturers shouldn't be an uncompetitive and unregulated money making scam, but that's exactly what it appeared to be to me, when I looked into it last at the beginning of the financial crisis (2007/2008).

There is no transparency on costs, and small businesses manufacturers have very little power to mould insurance services to their needs in ways that reflect their cash flow. If you want to do something "non-typical", which is anything to do with manufacturing right now, there is a big intake of breath and the number of insurers in the market willing to even consider taking the business drops like a stone.

In effect there is little or no competition, and the few service providers that remain are costly and inflexible, especially when it comes to the SME sector.

What is needed is a co-operative insurance society for small and medium sized manufacturing businesses with services that can be transparently and fairly costed (by consensus) across the sector.

James Arathoon


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James Arathoon
 02 June 2013 09:50 PM
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cblackha

Posts: 79
Joined: 21 January 2003

There are a number of sections of the Code of Federal Regulations than might apply - can you give us some more information about the product.

Charlie
 10 June 2013 02:56 PM
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kengreen

Posts: 400
Joined: 15 April 2013

jencam,

I wonder f this query does not go right back to pre-war years in that it is mixed with the different cultures that span the Atlantic..

It was I believe Oscar Wilde who declared the two nations to be separated by a common languaqe?

Certainly pre-war American domestic receivers had third-harmonic distortion built into them because it made them sound louder - see Kate Adie's comments on American tv and radio on her return to UK.
Domestic Rx's for the UK market always had short-wave (pretty useless) bands provided because the English selected the radio of choice by trying to see "how many stations it could bring in round the dial".

The echos of this still persist in the Hi-Fi culture of electric guitars. It is not realised that the "preferred" sound of tubed (pentode) amplifiers arises from the transfer characteristic's tendency to produce third-harmonic distortion while the characteristic of the triode lends itself to the softer sound of second-harmonic distortion which is preferred by the classic buff.

As I have posted elsewhere either of these configurations can be achieved when using either valves or semiconductors given that a Designer knows his way around feedback circuits and can distinguish current-driven circuits as distinct from voltage-driven circuits.

Ken Green
 12 July 2013 09:10 PM
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jencam

Posts: 608
Joined: 06 May 2007

Originally posted by: cblackha
There are a number of sections of the Code of Federal Regulations than might apply - can you give us some more information about the product.


It's a bit of a how long is a piece of string question. Assume that the products are all civilian and none are being sold to the military or for law enforcement. It might be easier if the products are split into the following categories.

1. Battery powered devices.

2. Low voltage devices powered from an external power supply or from another device such as a computer.

3. Mains powered devices.

Are there any standards or legislation about labels and decals used on products sold in the United States?
 07 August 2013 05:41 AM
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AustinClarke

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Joined: 30 July 2013

Hi, I am small business man and i have stock of some product for, I want to sell it in United States then i have to take permit from registrar office or not, please reply soon thanks.
 26 December 2013 09:08 AM
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mclaurinwilliams

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Joined: 26 December 2013

Here you are examining about some item which is composed by your son that has been sold commercially. In the event that your son chooses later on to offer items to the United States we have anyone have some exhortation or great sources of information about how to do it. For more details visit here.. theideasfactoryentrepreneurs.com
 12 January 2014 08:11 AM
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jencam

Posts: 608
Joined: 06 May 2007

Is it true that the majority of Americans don't understand celsius so anything with a temperature scale sold in the US has to read in fahrenheit?
 12 January 2014 10:17 AM
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Zuiko

Posts: 521
Joined: 14 September 2010

Americans use the Customary Units system; although scientists are most likely to use SI units, with kelvin and/or degree Celsius for temperature.

So, no, everything does not need Fahrenheit, it depends on the purpose of the instrument and who is going to use it.



As a matter of pedantry, Celsius has, unlike other SI units, a capital letter.



As to them not understanding, it's cultural rather than ignorance - I'm British and not that old (41) but still use the "double it and add thirty" rule of thumb for the weather forecast so I know how hot it will be. But strangely, only in the summer. Faranheit in the summer and Celsius in the winter. A hot summer's day is eighty degrees, and a cold winter's day in minus-something (and when abroad, for effect to describe how hot it was, I say, "it was over a hundred"; I didn't have to take a jumper to school when mum said it was "going to be sixty"). Bizarre.

Ditto, I also cannot "visualise" metric when gussing somebody's height and weight. If somebody told me that a person was 5'10" and 12 stone I would have an instant picture in my head of what they looked like. 169cm and 100kg? No idea - would have to convert it. Ditto miles and kilometers, inches and centimeters.

Maybe I am of the last (British) generation that is still more comfortable in everyday life with Imperial, but would always use SI for calculations?

Edited: 12 January 2014 at 10:31 AM by Zuiko
 12 January 2014 02:45 PM
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jencam

Posts: 608
Joined: 06 May 2007

I'm of the opinion that in Britain some imperial measurements are more familiar than others. I'm comfortable with feet and inches but fahrenheit is something I cannot comprehend. Does anybody under the age of 30 understand it? Fluid ounces are another measurement the younger generation doesn't seem to know. They can conceptualise a pint of milk or beer but if a fizzy drink was sold by the fluid ounce they would have no idea how big it is. There were some right weird measurements in bygone years like glass being sold in ounces per square foot.
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