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Topic Title: PMP and Military
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Created On: 01 February 2014 03:54 PM
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 01 February 2014 03:54 PM
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Wallancheck

Posts: 2
Joined: 05 October 2012

Hello, I am due to leave the Royal Navy very soon and was wondering if those who have also served and undertaken the training in order to receive the PMP qualification found that the PMI recognises the Services' Engineering training and experience in the same way that the IET does?

I have quite a few years of project and program management experience and am aware that there is quite a bit of work involved in receiving the PMP qualification. However, I'd rather concentrate on the learning required for the exam (including the need for 35 units) rather than re-hashing every hour of my 13 years' experience, as is the requirement to do prior to the exam it would appear. Any advice much appreciated.
 02 February 2014 03:37 PM
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jarathoon

Posts: 1041
Joined: 05 September 2004

This is not advice, it is a question, from someone who only gets to know about what is happening in the military from talking to servicemen and women on the odd occasion I get the chance and from watching television programmes.

Are naval officiers managing projects required to work on a project from start to finish now, or are people still moved around from posting to posting on a pre-defined schedule, every 2 or 3 years or so?

In your 13 years experience what proportion of the projects you have worked on, have you seen through from start to finish?

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James Arathoon
 02 February 2014 04:52 PM
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Wallancheck

Posts: 2
Joined: 05 October 2012

It varies depending on the situation. For instance, for 2 major programmes I was involved in, one I was brought in specifically to start and close, and the second I was brought in to recover it from a civilian programme manager who had let it fall in to a pretty bad situation. As for other projects, again, it is a mix. As an engineer, it often compares exactly with that of civilian PMs & PgMs - only that sometimes the budgets junior officers are dealing with can be ridiculously high in comparison to that of many of my civilian friends (mainly due to the high costs of equipment innovation and bespoke national/NATO manufacture/development base) . There is a misconception that the military is a very hierarchical organisation in every aspect. But actually we often work in matrix organisations, across cross-functional teams, and as a mix of military and civilian (where your rank is often irrelevant). I suspect that is why many leave and go in PM and Consulting.
 02 February 2014 06:09 PM
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jarathoon

Posts: 1041
Joined: 05 September 2004

Thanks.

I suppose as the military reduces in size relative to the rest of the economy there will need to be a further streamlining of military standards and practices, in engineering, project management etc, so that the civilian world and military world can come into line, where feasible. [allowing highly skilled engineering staff to move back and forth between the two worlds more easily]

Given this, I suppose a lot more thought has to be invested in how the military can be flexibly ramped up quickly in a particular tactical way, to meet a rapidly developing need.

Even in a civilian arena it is interesting to consider how prior scenario modelling, deep thinking and the right preparation can be used to rapidly roll out a project plan much quicker than would otherwise be possible.



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James Arathoon
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