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Topic Title: A Good Book in Management
Topic Summary: Anyone has any suggestion?
Created On: 07 February 2010 07:11 AM
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 07 February 2010 07:11 AM
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SAVIO

Posts: 343
Joined: 07 May 2002

Did anyone read a good book in Management? Any suggestion?
 09 February 2010 01:44 PM
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achung

Posts: 364
Joined: 22 November 2001

Hi Alan

Long time no see and sorry to intrude in this way.

I should appreciate if you could recommend books on 'entrepreneur' and 'marketing' for general application only.

Many thanks.

Cheers

-------------------------
Allen Chung
MSc(Eng) MSc CEng MIET MIEE CPEng MIEAust MHKCS SeniorMIIE
 09 February 2010 05:55 PM
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seeker

Posts: 319
Joined: 10 March 2007

Its long gone now I believe, but for a while GEC used to have "Up the Organisation" as recommended reading. I was most taken with a phrase on the lines of:
If you have a problem and don't know what to do to solve it ask someone in who does - then follow their advice - don't change what they tell you!
 15 February 2010 05:35 AM
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achung

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Originally posted by: seeker

Its long gone now I believe, but for a while GEC used to have "Up the Organisation" as recommended reading.


I hope it is never too late to say thank you for this excellent recommended management book.

-------------------------
Allen Chung
MSc(Eng) MSc CEng MIET MIEE CPEng MIEAust MHKCS SeniorMIIE
 20 February 2010 09:01 AM
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SAVIO

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Did anyone read about "Blue Ocean Strategy"?
 24 August 2010 06:02 AM
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stone8982001

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Yes, I read this book, it is about how to find a market segment without

competition.

and figure out the map on how to get this maketing strategy.

the problems we are facing is if we increase the customers' satisfaction,

we need increase the costs.

in Blue Ocean, when we increase customers's satisfaction, the costs

will down.

that is becasue we only foucs what the customers care, not we care.

this is really a good book.

-------------------------
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 26 August 2010 10:48 PM
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SCMIET

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Originally posted by: seeker

If you have a problem and don't know what to do to solve it ask someone in who does - then follow their advice - don't change what they tell you!


Great comment; the only problem however is that you don't learn the strategy for success (copying the final product doesn't get you there, it just gives you a poor imitation). The trick is to find someone who is excellent at what they do, discover their strategy (model it), delete the idiosyncrasies then install it in yourself.

As a coach I would never give someone advice; much better, I believe, to steer someone to work out the answer for them self. This way they develop the 'thinking' required whilst simultaneously empowering them.

Best

Stuart
Executive Coaching For Engineers

virtuallyperfect.org

Edited: 06 October 2010 at 10:40 PM by SCMIET
 25 September 2010 03:09 PM
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markjrounding

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The IET magazine had a recommendation in the June/July edition. They said it was one of the best going. The Editor was a female, but that is all I can remember.
 28 September 2010 09:52 AM
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michaelbusby

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I recently read, and would recomend, 'The 80 Minute MBA: Everything You'll Never Learn at Business School' by Richard Reeves and John Knell.
 28 September 2010 04:45 PM
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amillar

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Originally posted by: michaelbusby
I recently read, and would recomend, 'The 80 Minute MBA: Everything You'll Never Learn at Business School' by Richard Reeves and John Knell.

Yes, I 've recently read and enjoyed that as well.

I'm currently reading "The Rules of Work" and "The rules of Management" by Richard Templar. Good background stuff for management behaviour, although I do find them a bit Machiavellian at times.

-------------------------
Andy Millar CEng MIET CMgr MCMI

http://www.linkedin.com/in/millarandy

"The aim of argument, or of discussion, should not be victory, but progress." Joseph Joubert
 07 December 2010 05:54 PM
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dvaidr

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I've tried reading these books and texts and have failed miserably - well perhaps not miserably, just failed. Books and texts are nothing. One can read a book, say, on, electrical engineering and benefit from it, but where management comes into it, it's much more difficult. I maintain that managers are born, not trained.
 07 December 2010 07:12 PM
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SCMIET

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dvaidr

The problem with books and text is that they just aren't appropriate for learning a practical skill. Yes reading a book may help your tennis game but you're only going to get good at tennis actually playing and practicing good technique. There are some things that you just can't learn from a book - leadership and management are one (or two) of them but that doesn't mean that they can't be learnt. After all the past does not equal the future and if you haven't been successful yet then you just need to change your approach or you'll just get more of the same!

Stuart

www.virtuallyperfect.org
 22 December 2010 01:36 PM
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dvaidr

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Stuart,

I've been lucky enough to step outside of the UK and have worked abroad in faraway countires and continents for a while.

I came back to the UK and find that a good number of managers are like peacocks! Preening and posing and meaning not a lot. Nice to look at, but did I ever see them fly...? No.

There are management books, training, forums, societies, clubs and you can even become a Chartered Manager, (what!?).

We, along with our friends 'across the pond', even have management speak! A veritable dictionary of banalities and inanities!

Management comes naturally. Forcing yourself or someone else for that matter, to be a manager is a recipe for disaser and failure and that's where the UK is going wrong.

We've reached a stage where we can't even plan to buy enough road grit let alone keep an airport open. We're the laughing stock of the modern world. The sooner we realise this and drop the preening and get the right people in the right jobs, the better.

I remember getting a job as Engineering Manager at a well known international orgnaisation and the first thing I heard was 'You'll never change this place'. Seemingly three had tried before me but they had degrees in Business and Management. I turned it round in just under two years and it was down to the folk 'on the front line' to use a management phrase. It's about people and I know this will sound just as cheesy as any other preener, but if you know how to treat people you stand half a chance - they respond. The secret is in how you go about treating people though.

It's all preposterous, this management 'theory'.
 22 December 2010 02:51 PM
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SCMIET

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Hi Dvaldr

You make a number of really interesting points here - I think I might run some podcasts on leadership and management as there's a lot to talk about on this. I like you have also worked abroad and had the opportunity to see different cultures and attitudes to management and work. I think the fact that you notice a difference in management culture in other countries suggests that they are doing something consistently different - ergo, managers are not born - unless there is something genetic within foreign genes (not sure there's any evidence for this!)

Personally I think that theory is what it is - it's not the answer or endstate, but a tool; theory in itself is useless if you don't apply it. Which brings me on to my next point in that I make a distinction between management and leadership. Management is a set of tools and techniques that can be applied to systems, procedures, people and resources in general. Leadership on the other hand is the ability to ignite and provide direction to human motivation.

I would add that the manager or leader's motivation is paramount - you touched on this when you mentioned 'peacocks and preening'. If your motivation to be a leader is one of seeking status and attention to look good then your intent is misplaced and ultimately will result in poor results. However, if you're intent is to bring value to your team, do things better and where you genuinely care about those who you work with then this will have a massive, massive change in your behaviour. When it comes to leadership - your intent is everything and can't be faked.

Does this mean theory books are irrelevant? I don't think so; one can have the best intention and a laudable attitude but if they lack the basic skills, awareness and understanding of human behaviour then their efforts will be misguided and often counter-productive (nothing worse than a frustrated leader!)

I have had some appalling managers in my time and the meaning I take from that is to learn who to manage them and also what not to do. So I hope that your experiences of good and bad leadership only serve to continually improve your own development rather than taint the value of deeply learning about ones profession.

Anyway, hope you enjoy your christmas and new year

Best

Stuart

www.virtuallyperfect.org
 15 February 2011 12:20 PM
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Wyvern

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I'm currently reading "The Rules of Work" and "The rules of Management" by Richard Templar. Good background stuff for management behaviour, although I do find them a bit Machiavellian at times.


Yes, the "Rule of... Series is a fun read.
 15 February 2011 12:47 PM
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Wyvern

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dvaidr,

An interesting post, but, there's always a but isn't there :-)

I do not agree with you on a couple of key points.

Firstly: "Management comes naturally" I have to disagree with you, while it is certainly true that some people have strong character traits in areas useful to management and can more easily fill a management role than others these people can be either good or bad managers. Good Management and Good Leadership skills can be taught formally or learned through experience for those willing to learn.

Secondly, It's all preposterous, this management 'theory', I hope that this comment was at least in part tongue in cheek :-) I never met an engineer that did not think that their project would run smoother if
"management" would just stop interfering. While many management fads apear and run their course in quick order, the basic theories of how to manage effectively remain much the same and are useful tools to use.

As a experienced engineer that has made the transition to engineering management I have been lucky, I report to an understanding and forward thinking manager who is invested in my development and I work for a company that "in general" values engineers and has a history of promoting them to senior positions and providing the appropriate training for those roles. I have no dobt that I would not be as good at my job as I am without the training that I have received.

As for book reccommendations here is the reading list from the leadership traiing provided by my company. While these book are not to be treated as "bibles" there are valusble lessons in each for any manager wanting to develop above the ordinary.

. Good to Great Jim Collins

. First Break All the Rules Marcus Buckingham

. Developing the Leader Within John Maxwell

. Coaching for Improved Work Performance, Ferdinand Fournies

. 23 Irrefutable Laws of Teams John Maxwell

. Crucial Confrontations: Tools for talking about broken promises, violated expectations, and bad behavior Kerry Patterson

. "7 Habits of Highly Effective People" Stephan Covey
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