IET
Decrease font size
Increase font size
Topic Title: Companies who don't reply back.
Topic Summary:
Created On: 08 December 2009 11:30 PM
Status: Read Only
Linear : Threading : Single : Branch
Search Topic Search Topic
Topic Tools Topic Tools
View similar topics View similar topics
View topic in raw text format. Print this topic.
 08 December 2009 11:30 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



eswnl

Posts: 144
Joined: 29 November 2008

When I have been searching for jobs and contacting companies, I have found that if a company says they will contact you for interview, you never hear from them. Until you push them.
I have found this to be true for large companies as well and they have a HR dept to handle all this correctly.

Is it because they are busy or impolite. Why should I show them the same courtesy when they don't even show it to me.
 08 December 2009 11:45 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



jencam

Posts: 608
Joined: 06 May 2007

I think it is very discourteous of a company not to inform job applicants that they have been unsuccessful. It doesn't cost anything to send an email.
 09 December 2009 03:17 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



amillar

Posts: 1918
Joined: 28 May 2002

It is normal practice now for companies to only reply to applicants who successfully pass the short list stage, the better companies will make this clear in the advert "If you have not heard from us by xxx then unfortunately your application was unsuccessful on this occasion". But generally, you're trying to sell yourself, and you can't bully companies into taking an interest in you (just as I very much doubt that you reply to every advert to buy a product or service that gets sent to you!)

If you don't hear back just keep trying somewhere else. There is no problem of course with asking the company politely why your application appeared to be rejected, which can give useful information for future applications.

Why should I show them the same courtesy when they don't even show it to me.

I'm not quite sure what you mean by this. You are not showing "courtesy" by applying for a job, you are taking part in a business transaction which either side can leave at any point. If the company decide not to pursue your application that's up to them. If you decide not to pursue your application (maybe because they kept you waiting for weeks) that's up to you.

Far more importantly, if you are applying for many positions and not getting interviews you really need to get someone to look at your applications to see why this might be.

-------------------------
Andy Millar CEng MIET CMgr MCMI

http://www.linkedin.com/in/millarandy

"The aim of argument, or of discussion, should not be victory, but progress." Joseph Joubert
 09 December 2009 07:28 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



dlane

Posts: 685
Joined: 28 September 2007

Hi,

I would echo Andy's comments above. Some companies can get inundated with applications for a post and it can be quite time consuming for them to reply to all applicants.

Also don't think that the bigger the company is with an HR department they have the resources to put out responses, some of those big companies I have worked for have the most inefficient, slow recruitment processes I have ever come across. You are probably far more likely to get a response from the smaller companies.

I appreciate it that it is very frustrating not to get repsonses to jobs you have applied for, unfortunately when you apply for a job you don't know who you are up against and it could be that although you are capable of the job, other people who applied had more experience or qualifications etc.

For that reason it is always good to approach a company and ask them why you didn't get an interview, if you are doing that and they aren't responding then that is a bit naughty of them but there isn't much you can do about it unless you think you are being discriminated against. I would probably tend to look at it as if 'well if that's the way you are treating me before I come and work for you, what would you be like if I did work for you.'

Good luck

Donald Lane
 10 December 2009 11:28 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



jencam

Posts: 608
Joined: 06 May 2007

Originally posted by: amillar

It is normal practice now for companies to only reply to applicants who successfully pass the short list stage, the better companies will make this clear in the advert "If you have not heard from us by xxx then unfortunately your application was unsuccessful on this occasion".


This statement is commonly found with public sector jobs. Very rarely is it encountered with private sector jobs.

If the company decide not to pursue your application that's up to them. If you decide not to pursue your application (maybe because they kept you waiting for weeks) that's up to you.


Even employment agencies (despite their many faults) get very irritated at the lack of feedback from companies. Some companies fill the vacancy then never inform the employment agencies that it has been filled so they can delete it from their records. The result is that the employment agency becomes the target of criticism for advertising bogus jobs.

Originally posted by: dlane

I would echo Andy's comments above. Some companies can get inundated with applications for a post and it can be quite time consuming for them to reply to all applicants.

Also don't think that the bigger the company is with an HR department they have the resources to put out responses, some of those big companies I have worked for have the most inefficient, slow recruitment processes I have ever come across. You are probably far more likely to get a response from the smaller companies.


Twaddle.

There is no need to send each unsuccessful applicant a personalised letter on Basildon Bond paper by Special Delivery. Most job applicants nowadays supply an email address and it takes next to no time to send them a stock reply using blind carbon copy (Bcc). I have done it before although my boss was initially surprised at this move as he was from the camp of not informing unsuccessful applicants.
 16 December 2009 12:40 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



rjc3656

Posts: 15
Joined: 10 February 2009

Replying to every single person who applied to a job, especially if its in the hundreds is always going to be difficult.

However, if a person has taken the time, trouble and expense of attending an interview situation with only a handful of candidates, then I would expect a bit more.

A lot of the silence seen from companies/employers is due to them not wanting to have been accused of basing their selection on age, gender or race or sometimes there is so little between candidates that peoples "gut instincts" just cant be quantified - better to say nothing.
Also if the preferred candidate turns the role down, then they have not burnt their bridges with other candidates etc.

Doesnt stop it being a frustrating experience though.
 16 December 2009 05:58 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



westonpa

Posts: 1771
Joined: 10 October 2007

Originally posted by: wilson479

Last week I applied for a job online (via an agency) and after two weeks phoned them up for feedback on my application. After speaking to the recruitment lady for all of 30 seconds, it became clear she had not even read my covering letter or CV. She did quite hapilly pull it up for me off her email and let me know they where looking for someone with "more experience" (job advert had stated 1 year plus, which I have).

If she is not going to bother reading my carefully constructed covering letter and CV, what chance do I have?

I'm sure if the actual engineering manager had got to see my skill set, education and experience - he would have been inclined to atleast offer an interview.


If you stop you have zero chance.....so keep trying. I have noticed these days that many people do not know how to communicate properly, i.e., they either do not know about or follow the old courtesies or etiquettes. It seems as though the more electronic devices and means of communication which are provided and invented the worse it gets.

Staff agencies for the most part want to make a quick buck and when you can do that for them they want to be your best mate.....otherwise for the most part its don't call me and I will not call you. But keep trying because one day you will find the one you can make a quick buck for and you will think you have a new best friend!

Regards.
 16 December 2009 07:15 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message


Avatar for DavidParr.
DavidParr

Posts: 238
Joined: 19 April 2002

My worst experience of an agency was during the one (thankfully brief) period in my career when I had been made redundant due to a company insolvency, and I really needed to get a job. I had applied for a role that matched my CV so well that I thought I would be bound to at least get an interview. Little did I know!

Having heard nothing for a few days, I phoned the agency to enquire about the role, only to be told that they had decided not to put me forward because and I quote "They want a benge but you have a busk" After a short conversation it became clear that the person I was talking to had absolutely no idea what a benge (BEng) or a busk (BSc) were.

Funny looking back, but not at the time with a wife and three children to support!

-------------------------
David Parr BSc.CEng MIET
PRA
 16 December 2009 08:38 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



rjc3656

Posts: 15
Joined: 10 February 2009

I too have had similar experiences to the previous post with some agencies not being the sharpest tools.
While I was working out my notice period from previous employer before joining my current one I had a phone call from an agency informing of a great new position - yes thats right it was the job I was leaving
 03 March 2010 10:25 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



basil.wallace

Posts: 217
Joined: 01 April 2006

Originally posted by: westonpa

Originally posted by: wilson479



Last week I applied for a job online (via an agency) and after two weeks phoned them up for feedback on my application. After speaking to the recruitment lady for all of 30 seconds, it became clear she had not even read my covering letter or CV. She did quite hapilly pull it up for me off her email and let me know they where looking for someone with "more experience" (job advert had stated 1 year plus, which I have).



If she is not going to bother reading my carefully constructed covering letter and CV, what chance do I have?



I'm sure if the actual engineering manager had got to see my skill set, education and experience - he would have been inclined to atleast offer an interview.




If you stop you have zero chance.....so keep trying. I have noticed these days that many people do not know how to communicate properly, i.e., they either do not know about or follow the old courtesies or etiquettes. It seems as though the more electronic devices and means of communication which are provided and invented the worse it gets.



Staff agencies for the most part want to make a quick buck and when you can do that for them they want to be your best mate.....otherwise for the most part its don't call me and I will not call you. But keep trying because one day you will find the one you can make a quick buck for and you will think you have a new best friend!



Regards.


I would like to add that if you try to chase recruiters up by email regarding your applications for positions you're applied on-line because you don't get a response within a certain period of time, you get accused of sending emails every day/every other day. Especially if one is unemployed and have to satisfy one's jobseeker's agreement with their local Job Centre Plus office.

--------------------------------------------------
Basil Wallace PgDip EngTech MIET
 04 March 2010 03:47 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



amillar

Posts: 1918
Joined: 28 May 2002

Originally posted by: basil.wallace
I would like to add that if you try to chase recruiters up by email regarding your applications for positions you're applied on-line because you don't get a response within a certain period of time, you get accused of sending emails every day/every other day.


But that's what they get paid for. Just as I get pestered by recruiters every other day - however much I keep telling them that I haven't got any vacancies - because that's the other side of their jobs.

There is no shame in keeping contacting either recruiters or employers regarding updates on your application, as wilson479 mentioned above sometimes it's the only way of getting it read. Although, of course, keep it polite - no-one is going to let themselves be bullied into giving you a job.

Particularly true if you are applying 'on spec' rather than answering an advert: if every couple of months an employer sees the same person showing interest in working for them they may well feel inclined to see them first when a position does come up, just because they obviously really want the job.

-------------------------
Andy Millar CEng MIET CMgr MCMI

http://www.linkedin.com/in/millarandy

"The aim of argument, or of discussion, should not be victory, but progress." Joseph Joubert
 08 March 2010 11:36 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



basil.wallace

Posts: 217
Joined: 01 April 2006

Originally posted by: amillar

There is no shame in keeping contacting either recruiters or employers regarding updates on your application, as wilson479 mentioned above sometimes it's the only way of getting it read. Although, of course, keep it polite - no-one is going to let themselves be bullied into giving you a job.


I couldn't agree with you more. At the end of the day, both the recruiter and employer are the gatekeepers when it comes to replying/not replying back. Either they open the door or they close the door. There's not much that the jobseeker can do about it.

As you rightly said, recruiters or employers won't be bullied into giving anyone a job.

Employers today need to see that jobseekers can bring their previous success to their companies and help them to solve their problems, their issues, and achieve their business objectives instead seeing them as begging for a job.

Tough job hunting world we live in today.
--------------------------------------------------
Basil Wallace PgDip EngTech MIET
 19 August 2010 02:11 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



rossindevon

Posts: 1
Joined: 19 August 2010

A mixture of both?! At the end of the day you're wanting a job and you need to impress them. If you think the company's not making the effort, then re-evaluate if that's a company you want to work for!

If you're really wanting a particular job you'll have to put the effort and the courtesy in!

-------------------------
360inspire.com - Creative Advertising for Recruitment
 26 August 2010 11:05 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message


Avatar for SCMIET.
SCMIET

Posts: 7
Joined: 29 December 2009

I think that given the current economic climate it's not surprising that job applications are becoming increasingly competitive. I'd echo Ross' point that if the job is important to you then the effort needs to be there; being rude to your potential employer will almost certainly get the door shut on you and will not get you the result you want. My tips are:

1. Really do your research on the transferable skills for the jobs you are going for. Analyse dozens of adverts, ask recruitment agencies, HR staff.

2. Develop an end to end process that matches your skills to the skills they are looking for, or in other words:
- back engineer your CV to the job you are going for
- ensuring balance in your CV and the emphasis is on the right priority (aligned to your research)
- ensure that for every key skill you have written in your CV that you have at least two other good examples of that skill prepared for interview

3. Rehearse your interview answers using the 3 stages:
- what the problem was
- what you specifically did, highlighting your key skills
- what the positive result was

Your answers should be short and punchy, lasting 2-3 min tops, then shut up! Don't waffle. As for answering awkward questions, that's a skill that needs to be taught through exercises and is another post entirely.

Hope this helps!

Best

Stuart

virtuallyperfect.org
 10 September 2010 10:33 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



anchorman

Posts: 4
Joined: 31 October 2002

I am not surprised at the comments made under this this topic, but I wonder if a point has been missed. My experiences over the past decade suggest that the main problem is a steady decline in customer focus and frankly growing levels of incompetance by those operating customer interfaces.

This may be a somewhat provocative statement - but does anyone else agree this may be the root.


David
Statistics

See Also:



FuseTalk Standard Edition v3.2 - © 1999-2014 FuseTalk Inc. All rights reserved.