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Topic Title: Employing people with Asperger syndrome
Topic Summary: Advice for my son
Created On: 06 May 2007 06:10 PM
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 06 May 2007 06:10 PM
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jencam

Posts: 608
Joined: 06 May 2007

I'm not sure if this is the right place to come for advice, but hopefully somebody will be of help.

My son is 17 years old at college taking A Levels in Maths, Electronics, and Computing. He is given a lot of support and is predicted A grades, but is unsure about what to do after college.

The reason he is unsure is because he has Asperger syndrome. This doesn't impair him technically and he has always been of high intelligence, but it hinders him socially and affects the way he relates to others. His time at school was a complete misery because he had difficulty in fitting in with the system and relating to other children and some teachers. He found it difficult to make friends and was constantly bullied. He was suspended from primary school twice and expelled from secondary school. After spending two years being educated at home he decided to go back to (a different) secondary school to take GCSEs, but eventually dropped out after two terms due to stress and lack of suitable support.

My son's original plan was to go to university and either study electronic engineering or computing but couldn't decide which at the time. He is now having second thoughts and wondering whether it would be better to take a vocational course in computing or even attempt to enter the job market after college and build up a career through work experience. His career advisor at college wasn't too helpful but recommended contacting Asperger Technical and the IET for further information.

The people at Asperger Technical were very informative, although some of the information they provided was quite distressing. Asperger Technical is run by people with Asperger syndrome who hold science, engineering, and IT degrees who have first hand experience with the engineering and IT industry. One of their recommendations was to focus more on the public sector because it tends to be more inclusive. They also mentioned that studying for a degree could end up as a waste of time on the grounds that over 90% of recent engineering and IT graduates with Asperger syndrome find it impossible to find suitable employment due to the demands and obsessions by companies such as wanting graduates who are good all rounders, or have plenty of soft skills, or are diplomatic people, or are even keen sportsmen. There seems to be an attitude in society that for jobs requiring a higher level of technical skills or qualifications, employers expect more from a person socially in proportion. This could prevent my son from being accepted to a graduate level position, but he might be accepted for a junior position that doesn't require a degree.

For the past 3 years my son has been a member of a local Asperger syndrome support group and they have been very helpful and given good advice on many matters. If it wasn't for the support group then he probably wouldn't be at college now. A piece of advice the support group provided was to find organisations where people with Asperger syndrome are welcome, and avoid organisations that dislike employing people with Asperger syndrome before deciding on what to do after college. One advisor recommended that he goes the IT route rather than the electronics hardware route because 'geeky' people are often more welcome in IT than traditional engineering dominated by very conservative people in their 50s that hold prejudices towards people with Asperger syndrome. One member of the support group graduated in 2004 with a degree in electronic engineering and currently works at PC world because he has failed every interview elsewhere due to problems resulting from Asperger syndrome such as talking too abruptly in interviews or not having a track record being of a team player. I seriously think my son would fail job interviews unless the interviewer understood Asperger syndrome and would be happy to employ people with the condition.

I'm sorry if I have rambled on too much.

Best Regards

Jennifer
 06 May 2007 10:41 PM
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hullion

Posts: 122
Joined: 30 August 2002

Jennifer,

I don't know a huge amount about Asperger's so excuse my ignorance if I get anything wrong. My wife is a teacher who has a child with the syndrome in her class so that is purely where my knowledge comes from. My understanding is that it is somewhere on the Autistic Spectrum, but tends to indicate people who can be very talented but can struggle with social issues and changes to their routine.

As a manager in the engineering industry I have to admit that so called soft skills are very important to me. But I do work for a small company in which we need to have very flexible staff who can perform in a wide variety of positions. I know for example that I have hired someone with a 3rd from a pool of candidates that contained a 1st, 2:1, 2:2 and 3rd. The selection came down purely to interpersonal skills as if I am honest, in my opinion, what you learn in the first 6 months at work is far more relevant to your working life than anything you learn in 3-4 years at University. University simply teaches you skills, such as research, and a level of thinking not necessarily too much technical detail that you will apply.

For larger companies interpersonal skills can sometimes take a back seat - infact they can prefer people who are not as good at soft skills and are more technically focused in some roles. Research and Development roles in particular can be all about detail and not so much about dealing with customers where the skills you son may struggle with are more important.

Another route that may suit you son would be to stay more academic. So long as he is successful at a degree course he may find that staying within academia to be more suited to his personal needs, as that is a highly technical environment.

With respect to any concerns about him fitting in at University I would say the group of people you meet there is a very different group to anything at school. The groups that go to University are generally much more motivated about why they are there and as most people are far away from home and thrown into a mixing pot with people of all sorts of background they have a tendancy to look after each other a lot more as it is a mutual thing. Everyone needs support at some point. I don't know what sort of support provisions universities have themselves as I haven't come across the situation so I would strongly recommend contacting several to find out.

One final thought: I know that I would strongly recommend University to anyone purely for the experience - it is not just about getting a qualification. I know my wife read for a degree that she had no intension of ever using for a career, not everyone is focused on a definite career. I on the other hand was strongly set on being an Engineer for many years before. I made friendships at University that will last my entire life, I am far closer to many people from there than anyone I knew at school or have worked with since. Simply put I found a group of people who where far more like minded to me than anyone else. It was a great experience.

As I said at the start I am no expert in this matter but I hope my very quickly formed thoughts help.

-------------------------
Phil Hornby

"No plan survives contact with the enemy... or management... or sales"

Edited: 07 May 2007 at 10:20 AM by hullion
 09 May 2007 08:12 PM
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mbirdi

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Jennifer,

First of all well done for coming onto this forum and describing your son's condition and aspirations. I think it takes courage in doing something like that and I applaud you for it.

I'm afraid I am completely ignorant about Asperger syndrome and had never heard of it until you brought it to my attention. But I have managed to take a quick look over the internet and there is a lot of information on the subject including on the BBC's web site.

I Work in a University in the Information Systems section. I would say that your son would most probably fit in that sort of environment.

Industry can be a very pressure intensive place to work in and your son might not be able to cope with this. And with such pressure, staff may not be able to accommodate his condition.

Working in a University has its pressures but nothing like those in industry. As a result staff can be more understanding and able to work with colleagues who are, shall we say, different.

I would say your son should try and get a post as a Trainee in the IT department of a University. He would learn all aspects of IT (Hardware and Software) and probably be allowed to study on a day release course. We currently have someone of your son's age working with us as a Trainee, as it happens.

Our former Trainees have gone on to gain degrees in Computer Science and are employed as colleagues whilst others have moved onto other jobs in industry. If your son's interested in Electronics he could always do that or one that combines Electronics with Computer Science.

There's also the question of final salary pension scheme to consider. Universities offer this but not necessarily industry these days. The sooner your son enters working life the sooner he starts to contribute towards his pension. Which means he could potentially retire sooner rather than later.

There's no need to waste early years of pension contribution for the sake of studying full time for a degree which might not be of any use to him afterwards? As a Trainee, he could study for a degree whilst contributing to his pension.

There are also other benefits to working in Universities. For a start, your son could change his job and move to another University in the UK. His pension scheme would go with him because all Universities pension schemes are run by one company. I.e Universities Superannuation Scheme (USS).

There's also flexible working hours. One female colleague had to look after her sick husband............in Canada for a Month. The University allowed her to work from abroad, over the internet, whilst she received full pay. Universities are far more generous with things like this than industry. The pay is also pretty competitive with industry these days. So your son really can't go wrong. He'll probably enjoy working in a University more than he would in industry.

Mind you having said that, it depends on the staff your son might be working with. Some colleagues will take to him like duck to water whilst others might be too introverted themselves to interact with him. But I guess that's everywhere.

The last thing I would say is it would help a lot if your son could describe his condition to his employer and his work colleagues. That way his behavior would be better understood otherwise it may prove too much for some staff. Once it's understood people can adjust to it and everything is fine then.

Hope that helps.

Regards

Mehmood

Edited: 09 May 2007 at 09:42 PM by mbirdi
 11 May 2007 11:28 AM
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ahouston

Posts: 405
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Jennifer

I have first-hand experience of a fellow Model Engineer with Asperger syndrome. Judging by him - and I know that there are different levels of "ability" within the syndrome - I would guess that your son would obtain a good degree in any technical subject in which he was interested.

Despite what Mehmood says about simultaneously working and studying for a degree, I can tell you that this is not an easy option - both from personal experience and mentoring others who have followed this route. If your son wishes to get a degree, I would recommend that he does so by full-time study.

On the question of a job and degree/no degree, it is increasingly obvious that many companies and organisations - in both the private and public sectors - require degrees for jobs in which you or I would not think that necessary. Again, I have seen a number of instances where employees without degrees have been "passed over" for promotion in favour of "buying in" a graduate. In one instance, the employee was asked to train her new colleague - begging the question that she was good enough to train someone with a degree but not good enough to do the job without one.

The hardest question to answer is, "Would he get a job and be able to keep it ?". This will principally depend on his technical ability, the interview and his interpersonal abilities. A degree will not be a guaranteed "job-ticket", however, in a technical field - such as Electronics or Software - it is increasingly obvious that a degree (or Chartered Engineer registration) is one of the first "hurdles" to a job application.

Engineering is generally a team activity in which good interpersonal skills are an absolute necessity. There are, on the other hand, a number of "Engineering" jobs which might suit "individual contributors". Only you can judge your son's ability in this skill.

Finally, if your son ultimately wishes to be registered as a Chartered Engineer or Incorporated Engineer, he must have reached the equivalent of an MEng or BEng respectively.

Notwithstanding anything I - or other contributers - have said, the single most important criterion must be that he wants to get a degree and he is interested in the subject. If so, I'd say go for it !

I'm a Professional Registration Advisor (PRA) for the IET in London. If I can be of any more assistance, you can contact me here. If you live outside London, I can put you in touch with a PRA more local to you.

Best regards
Andy

-------------------------
Andy
EurIng Andrew Houston CEng FIET
PRA, PRI and Volunteer Career Manager Advisor
 13 May 2007 10:59 PM
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jencam

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Does the IET have people knowledgeable about Asperger syndrome? If so, have they done anything to promote understanding and awareness of the condition amongst people in industry including managers and interviewers?
 26 May 2007 12:01 PM
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deleted_muneer

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Hi

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Hope you find the site as useful as I have, if so post back your comments.

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Muneer
 19 June 2007 02:41 PM
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jencam

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Many thanks for your advice. There haven't been many replies which further reinforces what the Asperger syndrome support group and Asperger Technical have said about hardly anybody in the high technology industry has even heard of Asperger syndrome, let alone has a reasonably good understanding of the condition.

I'm interested in raising awareness of Asperger syndrome amongst the engineering and IT industry, but I'm not quite sure what the best strategy would be. One idea is to write an article about Asperger syndrome and publish it in a magazine read by people in industry. The IET publishes several magazines but are their editors willing to accept articles from people who are not IET members? Is it likely that an article about Asperger syndrome will be a welcome addition, or will it be deemed out of place by the editorial board?
 20 June 2007 12:48 PM
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jasonross

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Originally posted by: jencam

Many thanks for your advice. There haven't been many replies which further reinforces what the Asperger syndrome support group and Asperger Technical have said about hardly anybody in the high technology industry has even heard of Asperger syndrome, let alone has a reasonably good understanding of the condition.


Hi Jennifer

I read a while ago (in an IEEE journal) about a study by Simon Baron-Cohen at the University of Cambridge, who concluded that a large percentage of all Engineers have some form of autistic spectrum disorder. The links to the articles are here:

http://spectrum.ieee.org/oct06/4665

http://www.spectrum.ieee.org/dec06/4763

They appear to be aware of the phenomenon in the US, but as you've experienced there seems to be little recognition in the UK.

I work as a software engineer, and have seen many of the "classic" Asperger's syndrome symptoms in quite a few of the engineers I have worked with in the past. I'm not sure whether any of them actually had Asperger's, but in any case their lack of "soft skills" was never really a problem - they tended to be thought of as "typical software types". This was in larger companies though - as Phil Hornby mentioned previously, smaller companies tend to need people to change roles more often, so "soft skills" can become more important.

I'd certainly recommend he gets a degree from a good university. In the times I've helped with recruitment I've seen very few CVs for people without degrees.

I hope that this helps.

Best regards

Jason Ross CEng MBCS MIET MIEEE
 02 July 2007 02:49 PM
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jencam

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I'd certainly recommend he gets a degree from a good university.


How do you define a good university?

In the times I've helped with recruitment I've seen very few CVs for people without degrees.


I believe you, but I don't subscribe to the million Germans can't be wrong argument.

We are currently investigating apprenticeships as they might be better than doing a degree. The computing teacher says that IT degrees are noddy and not worth the time and money bothering with, and computer science degrees are too technical and do not provide what employers really want. The technical side of the apprenticeship will probably be beneath my son's level of knowledge, but he will learn business skills and how to succeed in an work environment, that employers are increasingly interested in today.

Does anybody know more about apprenticeships?
 02 July 2007 03:16 PM
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tazzo

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Hi Jennifer

You can find infomration on apprenticeships on the IET Circuit website IET Circuit - Apprenticeships.

I hope this helps.

Your idea for an article on Asperger's syndrome and the Engineering and IT industries also sounds good to me. I've passed your suggestion for an article on to the magazine staff at the IET

Brian Tarry, MIET

-------------------------
Brian Tarry
Projects Office Manager
The Institution of Engineering and Technology
 02 July 2007 09:43 PM
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hullion

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Can I just say that your son's IT teachers view is not neccesarily the opinion that I generally come across. Whilst I agree that a degree doesn't teach you everything that you need to know for a job not having one often creates a glass ceiling that you simply cannot get past. I know that most of my customers will not accept anyone working for them who does not have a degree. It is a selection criteria that is easy to apply as well as generally providing a level of assurance that the candidate will have a good academic standard and ability to learn.

Ultimately having the ability to learn is more important in the first few years of employment than the qualifications you have - as anything you have will not cover everything you need to know.

It really depends what type of role your son is looking for at the end of the day as to which is the best route. If your son is wanting to be in IT as opposed to software development then the apprenticeship and looking at qualifications such as the Microsoft/Cisco/etc Certification schemes will probably open more doors. On the other hand if creating software is of more interest then look at Software Engineering degrees as these are far more practical than Computer Science and a much easier way into the industry.

-------------------------
Phil Hornby

"No plan survives contact with the enemy... or management... or sales"
 03 July 2007 12:47 AM
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jencam

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Ultimately having the ability to learn is more important in the first few years of employment than the qualifications you have - as anything you have will not cover everything you need to know.


What about self education? This is something my son is good at along with a high proportion of people who have Asperger syndrome. He had problems at school with the classroom based teaching of a rigid curriculum, but he has no problem sitting down at home and learning new stuff by reading a book. His computing teacher was very impressed with his level of knowledge when he started the course. He knew about Linux, programming in C and PHP, networks, and website design using XHTML and CSS. He learnt most of these himself with very little outside help.

It really depends what type of role your son is looking for at the end of the day as to which is the best route. If your son is wanting to be in IT as opposed to software development then the apprenticeship and looking at qualifications such as the Microsoft/Cisco/etc Certification schemes will probably open more doors. On the other hand if creating software is of more interest then look at Software Engineering degrees as these are far more practical than Computer Science and a much easier way into the industry.


The boundary between IT and software development is not clearly defined. For a start, which category does web programming fit in? Technically it is software development but many web programmers come from an IT and not a computer science background. The computing teacher mentioned that software development using scripting languages is on the rise and suspects that the use of compiled languages is set to decline. Also, developing software is something being outsourced to low wage countries, so will careers exist in the UK apart from managers or team leaders?
 03 July 2007 07:24 AM
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hullion

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What about self education? This is something my son is good at along with a high proportion of people who have Asperger syndrome. He had problems at school with the classroom based teaching of a rigid curriculum, but he has no problem sitting down at home and learning new stuff by reading a book. His computing teacher was very impressed with his level of knowledge when he started the course. He knew about Linux, programming in C and PHP, networks, and website design using XHTML and CSS. He learnt most of these himself with very little outside help.


I don't disagree that this is a valuable skill - what I would stress though is that nt having a degree can be an almost insurmountable barrier to entering some careers. And definately can limit upwards mobility with many organisations.


The boundary between IT and software development is not clearly defined. For a start, which category does web programming fit in? Technically it is software development but many web programmers come from an IT and not a computer science background. The computing teacher mentioned that software development using scripting languages is on the rise and suspects that the use of compiled languages is set to decline. Also, developing software is something being outsourced to low wage countries, so will careers exist in the UK apart from managers or team leaders?


It's pretty obvious when you are in the industry. In my experience most web developers these days - due to the increasing interaction and personalisation (facilitated via programming) - have a software engineering background. Not to say that it is all software engineers, you get IT based people covering different areas of web development - it is a multi-discipline area with many roles. As you have all sorts of people generating content and designers doing a lot of the UI and appearance work although they often hand it to the programmers to actually create it.

The choice between scripting/compiled isn't that straight forward but that is a whole other debate...

As for job migration - the general perception that I come across is that "the West" still leads on innovation - and if it is to keep it's work it has to maintain that. That said a lot of work does and has moved out of the UK. As the IT/Software world is a constantly moving world there is lots of scope for innovation so I see there being sufficient potential in the market, if not I would have changed career myself by now...

-------------------------
Phil Hornby

"No plan survives contact with the enemy... or management... or sales"
 06 July 2007 12:55 AM
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jencam

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I don't disagree that this is a valuable skill - what I would stress though is that nt having a degree can be an almost insurmountable barrier to entering some careers. And definately can limit upwards mobility with many organisations.


This is true to an extent. However, what really matters the most is whether my son is happy at work and accepted by colleagues and management. This is why there are plans for him to enter employment as soon as possible to find out how well he fares in the work environment. If he finds that he needs a degree to progress then he can study for one at a later time.

The Asperger syndrome is a serious issue as well because I think that many employers expect business skills and social standards to increase in line with level of qualification. In other words, they may accept somebody for a job that doesn't require a degree, but reject them for a job that requires a degree, because they are weak at the business skills and come across as a bit eccentric at the interview. Getting a foot in the door at a lower level and building up work experience could end up being more successful than trying to use qualifications to parachute in to a higher level career.

There is also the possibility that he could end up finding that the engineering or IT industry is not for him.

As for job migration - the general perception that I come across is that "the West" still leads on innovation - and if it is to keep it's work it has to maintain that. That said a lot of work does and has moved out of the UK. As the IT/Software world is a constantly moving world there is lots of scope for innovation so I see there being sufficient potential in the market, if not I would have changed career myself by now.


Who actually is driving the innovation in the computer industry?
 06 July 2007 07:29 AM
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hullion

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This is true to an extent. However, what really matters the most is whether my son is happy at work and accepted by colleagues and management. This is why there are plans for him to enter employment as soon as possible to find out how well he fares in the work environment. If he finds that he needs a degree to progress then he can study for one at a later time.


I don't disagree with you here. Just another couple of point: 1. most people I haved talked to who did a degree later in life found it very hard, much harder than people going straight from sixth form; 2. My concern for your son would be he would enter the workig world love his job and want to progress and then find that he can't due to a lack of the right qualifications.


The Asperger syndrome is a serious issue as well because I think that many employers expect business skills and social standards to increase in line with level of qualification. In other words, they may accept somebody for a job that doesn't require a degree, but reject them for a job that requires a degree, because they are weak at the business skills and come across as a bit eccentric at the interview. Getting a foot in the door at a lower level and building up work experience could end up being more successful than trying to use qualifications to parachute in to a higher level career.


A degree isn't neccesarily going to start you at a high level it just allows you to progress to one in the future.


There is also the possibility that he could end up finding that the engineering or IT industry is not for him.


Quite possible but isn't this a risk everyone who chooses a degree based on the career they think they want takes? If I look at myself I decided at 14 to do engineering, but what did I really know that that point? So I chose to do extra things to explore it as a career. I took extra GCSEs at the same time as my A'Levels to broaden my knowledge as well as attending a Headstart week. Okay this was still all preparation for the degree route but it confirmed my interest but during my summers I worked at various engineering companies, usually on a voluntary basis, to get a feel for the career. That way I was sure before I committed to 4 years of uni that I was heading in the right direction.


Who actually is driving the innovation in the computer industry?


This is hard to say definately as it's not my industry but most of the big IT/computer companies have huge operations in "the West" and from my perception a lot of the new technologies and techniques come from that direction.

My comment wasn't industry specific - the perception of innovation coming from "the West" is a general sentiment I have encountered.

-------------------------
Phil Hornby

"No plan survives contact with the enemy... or management... or sales"
 08 July 2007 08:42 PM
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jencam

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So if someone is not good at a particular task you are advocating just giving up on it and not practicing or striving to overcome your obstacles.


Depends on what the task is. If the individual can see value in succeeding such as with a difficult examination leading to a professional career, then putting in the effort to finally succeed will be worth it. However, if the individual cannot see any point in the activity and they do not feel that they will benefit from it, then really they would be better off doing something else.

My son was useless at team sports in school PE lessons and he didn't enjoy them. He could see no real purpose in the lessons at all or why it would benefit him in the future from having to play football.

I believe in this day and age we do not have enough 'sport or physical activity' in schools and that some of the subjects in the curriculum should be removed to make way for them or the Government (in my case the Scottish Executive) should ensure local councils run classes after schools hours (generally when children get out and parents are still at work) where physical education and activities are pursued. Possibly then we can tackle the cronic health problems of our children and also try and tackle the perceived 'yob' culture.


There is some truth to what you say. Obesity is on the rise and children aren't getting enough physical exercise. However, I am strongly in favour of timetabled National Curriculum PE lessons focusing more in physical fitness and exercise rather than team sports. Some children are not very good at team sports and the way schools run their PE lessons is very effective at turning them away from any type of physical exercise. There are some young teenagers I know who are morbidly obese and don't do an ounce of physical exercise. They also eat an unhealthy diet. When my son was homeschooled in Y8 it concerned me that he would evade physical exercise. He would even lose the exercise from walking around school between lessons. Part of his homeschooling contract was carrying out a certain amount of physical exercise each week.

Remember some studies have shown that improving balance and motor skills can help with several neurological conditions and childrens overall behaviour.


There are various activities that improve co-ordination and motor skills. Many people who work in certain areas of SEN know about these activities, but sadly most schools and educational psychologists don't. My son participated in several of these activities after joining an Asperger support group and they really helped with his physical co-ordination.
 25 July 2007 05:04 PM
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jencam

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Gordon Brown urged to launch autism compact with employers.

An article in Personnel Today.
 29 July 2007 10:19 AM
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caz17st

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The National Autistic Society runs employment consultancy from four offices London, Manchester, Glasgow and Leeds and is running projects to help people with Asperger Syndrome to prepare for and sustain work. For more information please see our website at:

Link removed/nas/jsp/polopoly.jsp?d=1244

There is an information pack produced by the NAS in 2004 which has some guidance for employers and employees about good practice on helping people with AS get the most of our their work:
Link removed/nas/jsp/...poly.jsp?d=507&a=5974

Prospects Leeds is looking for work placements for clients interested in IT roles in Leeds, Knaresborough, York, Helmsley, Scarborough, Wakefield and Halifax. If you would be interested in taking on a client who wants to prove themselves in a job - please let me know


Carole Birtwhistle
NAS Prospects Leeds Step into Work project
Link removed/nas/jsp/polopoly.jsp?d=696
Tel 0113 236 6767
 30 July 2007 02:08 AM
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timc

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This is belated. I came across the thread during a web search.

No-one seems to have stepped in who has direct experience of Asperger's.

I am old, have worked in technical fields for many years, and whilst we vary somewhat the core problems are the same.

In some ways it is aboout maturing slowly and with practice many of us can become very good with other people, up to a point. That's when things can and do go very wrong. We are simply different, not ill.

The kids today are in a far better position than the older generations but for one problem: society and the workplace has changed in very bad ways for us.

Something that few realise is that the law enables discrimination on the grounds of disability, unlike with religion, sexuality, ethnicity, age etc. Surprised?
This is largely understandable, necessary but as ever give someone an inch where money is involved... so accomodation, reasonable adjustments tends to mean little.

There are lots of things that cause problems, such as open plan offices. The unspoken also causes lots of trouble but I won't go into that, far too much for here.

You get fed up with someone coming up to you and accusing you of having upset X, being nasty to them. All you did is speak straight but didn't read they could not take it. Example, explain to them that they asked for the spam, even if you don't say "so don't complain". Often the difficulties come not from the AS but from others who have, how shall I put it, maturity problems.

A personal observation:- I tend to work well with a senior person, kind of a team as the guru. I've come across this mentioned before and there is something critical: the other person keeps the bad people off your back, at bay. Other person leaves, resign very fast...

What is good work in technical fields today?
A lot of the work has been exported offshore so unless you want to compete with people on low pay, which you cannot, don't. Manufacturing is largely dead now.

For me over the years to ideal has been work at home, which I have done for maybe 15 out of 40. Arranging that is a hard trick.

I hope that is some help. (feel free to contact me privately if you wish)
 30 July 2007 02:42 PM
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jencam

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Joined: 06 May 2007

Prospects Leeds is looking for work placements for clients interested in IT roles in Leeds, Knaresborough, York, Helmsley, Scarborough, Wakefield and Halifax. If you would be interested in taking on a client who wants to prove themselves in a job - please let me know


So is Asperger Technical but so far nobody has had the courage to come forward.

Prospects is not always highly rated by people with Asperger syndrome. You can read about a few people's experiences here.

Edited: 30 July 2007 at 02:43 PM by jencam
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