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Topic Title: home network
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Created On: 05 January 2012 06:18 PM
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 05 January 2012 06:18 PM
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OldSparky

Posts: 592
Joined: 28 June 2011

hello peeps

normally in the regs forums so new to here..

i have wired my house with cat6 cable for a home network..

i would like some advice on how to connect everything.

i have a wirless home hub but it wont work through the thick walls so my plan was to plug the pc or playstation in the rj45 sockets.

i have been on the net and as far as i can work out a 10 port switch would do the job with the hub connected to this..

could you let me know if thats correct and would work?

regards
 05 January 2012 11:29 PM
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gkenyon

Posts: 4480
Joined: 06 May 2002

Generally, yes.

My home hub has 2 off RJ45 outputs.

Either or both of these will feed an "n-port switch", the maximum number of devices may well be limited by your router, i.e. across the 2 wired ports together may well be 253 devices for my home hub.

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Eur Ing Graham Kenyon CEng MIET TechIOSH
 06 January 2012 07:47 AM
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rogerg

Posts: 27
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Hi Sparky,
Yes, typical multiport switch is ideal. They can also be daisy chained together to simplify wiring e.g. 1 per floor or room. Personally I use D-link - simple, cheap, reliable and you don't need to worry about wireless security. If you are anything like me, you will never have enough ports in the right place though!
If you have already done the house wiring then the rest is easy.
All the best,
Roger
 06 January 2012 08:12 AM
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OldSparky

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Joined: 28 June 2011

Originally posted by: rogerg

Hi Sparky,

Yes, typical multiport switch is ideal. They can also be daisy chained together to simplify wiring e.g. 1 per floor or room. Personally I use D-link - simple, cheap, reliable and you don't need to worry about wireless security. If you are anything like me, you will never have enough ports in the right place though!

If you have already done the house wiring then the rest is easy.

All the best,

Roger


thanks roger

could you tell me what D link is please
 06 January 2012 08:31 AM
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rogerg

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Try searching for D-Link DES 1008D - about £25-£30 each (8 port) or D-Link DGS 1016D Switch - faster and 16 ports (£130).
Unless your ISP has a really phenominal connection speed, you won't be needing gigabit ethernet internally to get www access. This is different for businesses, of course, but usually overkill at home.
Many other switches exist, but don't buy a "hub" - see http://helpdeskgeek.com/networ...ter-vs-switch-vs-hub/
Roger
 12 January 2012 04:54 PM
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OldSparky

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Joined: 28 June 2011

Originally posted by: rogerg

Try searching for D-Link DES 1008D - about £25-£30 each (8 port) or D-Link DGS 1016D Switch - faster and 16 ports (£130).

Unless your ISP has a really phenominal connection speed, you won't be needing gigabit ethernet internally to get www access. This is different for businesses, of course, but usually overkill at home.

Many other switches exist, but don't buy a "hub" - see http://helpdeskgeek.com/networ...-switch-vs-hub/

Roger



thanks Roger

just one more question

do i connect the outlets as A or B
 13 January 2012 08:11 AM
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rogerg

Posts: 27
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Hi Sparky,
Cat 5/6 wiring within a small area can be done to a few different standards with regard to wiring colours, and it doesn't matter much as long as you are consistant. I would use style A for all outlets, but I am not an expert in this!. Couple of links:-
http://www.ertyu.org/steven_nikkel/ethernetcables.html
http://www.peakelec.co.uk/downloads/ethernet.pdf
and even a wiki:-
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category_6_cable
 13 January 2012 09:13 AM
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Roundtrip

Posts: 247
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Actually you will find T568B is the more common wiring scheme implemented by most data cabling companies and IT professionals. Easy way to see an example of it in the real world... look at a manufactured patch cable to see the wiring scheme used.

However, as pointed out you need to choose one of the standard wiring schemes then be consistent on both ends of that cable run.

-------------------------
Best wishes & regards

John A Thomson
allayit
 29 February 2012 12:44 PM
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rogerg

Posts: 27
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Thanks John,
do you know why the B scheme is preferred to the A? Is it just history?

As an update, I have just replaced 3 x 8 port D-Link with 1 x 24 port TP-LInk (£41 delivered)
Cabinet now runs MUCH cooler, which was the main reason for the change.
Link:- http://uk.tp-link.com/products...d=224&model=TL-SF1024
TP-Link seem to get very little publicity, but I now have 3 different devices from them and they seem very good.
Roger
 29 February 2012 01:30 PM
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Roundtrip

Posts: 247
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This messageboard thread seems to have covered the bases regarding A vs B:
http://www.dslreports.com/forum/remark,15766524

Don't forget Wikipedia:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TIA/EIA-568

TP-Link kit, although cheap and cheerful, does what it says on the tin for most users.

-------------------------
Best wishes & regards

John A Thomson
allayit
 15 March 2012 07:10 PM
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OldSparky

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thanks for all your help..

i have chosen the A scheme.. the reason i fitted to many to change them
 24 June 2012 06:38 AM
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energy90

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Good choice. I think that it is perfectly fine for you.
 06 December 2013 06:40 AM
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jahangeer100

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I have a dual band router (D-Link DIR-8255) and 5Ghz using in my home network.
 22 January 2014 04:54 PM
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dickllewellyn

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Just to revisit this thread if I may. Like OldSparky, I'm usually in the wiring regs forum and only occasionally pop by here for a read!

We are refurbishing a large house for a client, and there is an office in one wing where the BT telephone and broadband enter the building. There is a second office proposed in the other side of the house where I intend to wire a few permanent data points. Between the two offices is a cellar where I could mount switches etc and hence wire any other data points around the house back to ie TVs etc. The client would also like to have a wireless signal throughout the house. Currently WiFi reaches the whole of the wing where the first office is and only just gets into the main house. Is there a device or devices I can plug in to one of the outlets to provide an additional wireless route? Could I perhaps mount something in the cellar? A. I best using cat5, cat5e, or cat6 cable?

-------------------------
Regards
Richard (Dick)

"Insert words of wisdom and/or witty pun here"
 23 January 2014 08:36 AM
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ectophile

Posts: 546
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You can get wireless hotspots that just connect to ethernet. Those broadcast a separate signal to the main wireless router, which may or may not be an issue. Otherwise, you need repeaters.

Don't bother with cat5, even if you do still manage to find it. Stick with cat5e or cat6. Cat6 would be better for fixed wiring these days to allow for higher speeds in the future.

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S P Barker BSc PhD MIET
 24 January 2014 10:21 PM
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dickllewellyn

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Ectophile. Thanks for the reply. I'll look into it. Any idea where I can get a wireless hotspot from? And is that the words I need to search for? I guess someone like CPC might be a good port of call?

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Regards
Richard (Dick)

"Insert words of wisdom and/or witty pun here"
 25 January 2014 01:53 AM
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ectophile

Posts: 546
Joined: 17 September 2001

Try looking for a "wireless access point" if you have wired ethernet you want to add wifi to. Or look for a repeater to extend the range of an existing wifi signal.

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S P Barker BSc PhD MIET
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