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Topic Title: confusion in selection of a language
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Created On: 16 July 2011 04:03 PM
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 16 July 2011 04:03 PM
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chirag0610

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Joined: 02 July 2011

hello, actually i am in fix that which language i should go for according to today's trend .......java or .net.

can anyone suggest that which will be better for long time.....
 03 August 2011 03:52 AM
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deleted_1_Nimer

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There's no such thing as a "better" language when it comes to programming; you need to know your specific target. .Net & Java (as well as other scripting & compiled languages) all have their advantages, but it all depends on who are your intended users, what's the intended application for your program, how you'll deliver the program & how the user will access/run it.

You need to consider what platform you want to program for (i.e.: will you target Windows users, Mac users, Linux/BSD users, Android users, iPhone OS users, cross-platform or web-based/platform-independent?). This is critical; the language to use does depend on your target platform.

Then, consider what you want your program to do & estimate how resource-intensive it may be. This is the reason why you really can't do certain things using certain languages (for example, I guarantee that you can't fully replicate any PlayStation 3 game's graphics into a web-based JavaScript program without bringing your computer down on its knees). Some languages are best suited for certain tasks because of their nature.

Finally, you need to know your intended user-base. It's not like anyone can use any program; some programs may be complicated enough for average users to require training, while more advanced users may find it a breeze to use.

Whith all this said, I'll ask you; what do you want to create? Who's your intended audience/user-base & what platform would you expect them to use?

-------------------------
Technology: something that's hated & cursed at by all engineers, technologists & technicians!

( Lousy modern technology! )
 04 August 2011 01:17 PM
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chirag0610

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Thank you Nimer.........

Actually I m a student , want to learn java or .net that's why i want suggestion that in which i should go, Both are new to me .....
well i works in c++ so should i go in c++ only or try above these also for making my carrer in software field well i love to work in c++ rather java (i know java little bit). but as i got to know from somewhere that it is the trend of java or .net ..... plz suggest.
 05 August 2011 05:16 AM
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deleted_1_Nimer

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I don't think you understood what I said. I can't suggest anything to you because YOU need to know what YOU want to do.

I understand that you're a student & that you want to choose between two programming languages. That's still no excuse to not ask yourself the reasons & causes to study any of the two programming languages you've listed.

Maybe I'll describe to you the benefits & trade-offs of each language.

Java is a very broad programming language. This is the language that bears the greatest similarity to C++; it's an object-oriented language that can be used for a broad range of things. For example, OpenOffice.org is an open-source equivalent to Microsoft Office; it's programmed as a Java application. Another example: http://www.virtualnes.com/ is a web archive of old Nintendo NES games, readily accessible for play via a Nintendo NES emulator applet written in Java. The beautiful thing about Java is that it's an extremely portable language; as long as an operating system has the Java Runtime Environment or Java Virtual Machine installed on their computer, any user can run a Java applet or application, regardless of the operating system in use. However, its greatest use is in embedded systems (such as cell phones).

.Net, on the other hand, isn't as portable as Java (it can only target Windows-based operating systems,) but it provides interoperability across the different versions of Windows that has the most recent .Net framework updates installed. From a programming point of view, .Net offers extended programming libraries for multiple programming languages (such as C++, C#, Visual BASIC, etc.) & offers broader security for networking applications. This said, you can only target Windows & you can only create applications. Microsoft Office is just one example of a program that uses the .Net framework.

Like I said before, you have to ask yourself what you want to do in the industry; what sort of programmer you want to be. If you're interested in programming for the latest smart phones, or if you're interested in online applications, Java's the choice for you (as it's most used in the web design & embedded hardware industries). But, if you decide to be a programmer for a large firm that deals with Windows-based software products, then your best bet is .Net. I've explained what I could; it's up to you to know yourself, know your goals & make the decision yourself.

-------------------------
Technology: something that's hated & cursed at by all engineers, technologists & technicians!

( Lousy modern technology! )

Edited: 05 August 2011 at 05:23 AM by deleted_1_Nimer
 29 September 2011 11:02 AM
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lowson_i

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Nimer's comments are well worth reading in reply.

I just wanted to point out that .NET is not a programming language whereas Java is.

Please note that currently a massive percentage of the UK still run Windows XP running as a virtual machine in Windows 7 with applications and Active-X com components developed in Visual Basic 6, with new features developed in C# for .NET interoping where required, which are also accessed via a web service developed in Java, administered from a web page interface developed in Dreamweaver with client scriping in JavaScript and server side scripting in ASP.NET, limited by ChilliASP running on an Apache Server on a linux box accessed by numerous Windows Client machines running FireFox. And people used to think that assembler was hard!

Seriously, there is no one panacea programming syntax. No matter where you work in the future 'C' is ubiquitous. It is the root of all evil, horrible to code in, requires stupid semi-colons everywhere. Throws out warnings you'll ignore, won't link because you've done something stupid and/or not copied properly from a website somewhere. And don't get me started on #INCLUDE!!!!

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Ian Lowson MIET

Do or do not, there is no try!
 03 October 2011 04:31 AM
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deleted_1_Nimer

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Wow... That was actually a bit funny to read (especially your dislike of C language).

But one thing is true; .Net isn't a programming language, but a set of libraries to extend the programming languages that are available through Microsoft's Visual Studio IDE. And putting humour aside, all that you've said is true. Ultimately, choosing a programming language to learn requires you to know which market you want to target as a career. It may require you to know how potential customers behave & how universal you want your product to be, but it still boils down to hard work, both in studying & working in the industry.

I'm just glad that nobody on this forum has asked about courses on programming MS Excel macros in VisualBASIC.

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Technology: something that's hated & cursed at by all engineers, technologists & technicians!

( Lousy modern technology! )
 11 October 2013 03:46 PM
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Thiyagarajan

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Hi,
Java is best as per me. Because, all applications are developed using JAVA. Also, there are so many job openings in Java.
But, before start to learn Java or .net, you can learn C language.
you can refer some tutorial which is useful for beginners.

Edited: 11 October 2013 at 04:03 PM by Thiyagarajan
 11 October 2013 07:47 PM
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jarathoon

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Actually today's trends are towards artificial intelligence, automated code generation and doing away with expensive and buggy manual programmers.

Work is underway to invent a new automated language, called Jenny, named after the Spinning Jenny. After all today's manual programmers are like bit like the manual cotton spinners of the 18th century, preparing for the moment when no one will want to employ them.

James Arathoon




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James Arathoon
 11 October 2013 09:38 PM
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jencam

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Originally posted by: jarathoon
Actually today's trends are towards artificial intelligence, automated code generation and doing away with expensive and buggy manual programmers.

Work is underway to invent a new automated language, called Jenny, named after the Spinning Jenny. After all today's manual programmers are like bit like the manual cotton spinners of the 18th century, preparing for the moment when no one will want to employ them.


They said that when FORTRAN first came out. It was a holy grail that would put an end to computer programmers because it was so easy for users with no programming knowledge to write their own code. The rest is history...
 11 October 2013 11:12 PM
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jarathoon

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They said that when FORTRAN first came out. It was a holy grail that would put an end to computer programmers because it was so easy for users with no programming knowledge to write their own code. The rest is history...


I agree the trend has been going for quite a while now. There was a symposium called "Mechanisation of Thought Processes" held at the National Physical Laboratory in November 1958, where there was a session held on "Automatic Programming", with a talk by John Backus called "Automatic Programming: Properties and Performance of FORTRAN I and II"

This talk references back to a conference in Los Angeles in California in Feb 1957.

http://archive.computerhistory...2663113.05.01.acc.pdf

It can be safely said the early pioneers of computing completely underestimated the difficulty of the automated programming task. At least 56 years of work and progress has been extremely limited. I suspect it might be a easier problem than developing fusion energy for example; we may just currently thinking about it in the wrong way.

If I am wrong then this could be like fusion energy; always 20, 30 or 40 years away (depending on who you quote), but the trend is certainly there and could be one that suddenly and unexpectedly speeds up at some stage, all thanks to a new Language called "Jenny".

James Arathoon

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James Arathoon
 16 October 2013 04:33 PM
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ronac

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Originally posted by: Thiyagarajan

Hi,

Java is best as per me. Because, all applications are developed using JAVA. Also, there are so many job openings in Java.

But, before start to learn Java or .net, you can learn C language.

you can refer some tutorial which is useful for beginners.


I agreed that should learn C prior to other languages.
By learning C, you will get to understand all the things "under-hood" from low-level perspective, just for example, memory management, pointers ... etc.

Which I always believe as a good programmer you'll need these knowledge to do the right thing, although modern languages like java/C# wraps all of these inside their framework.

I dont know which language you are referring to by .NET, but let me discuss and assume it is c# as I am more familiar with it.
Personally I thinks that java and c#.net has no much difference, as a programmer you can easily switch from language to language, especially between c#.net/java as they are very similar.
 19 October 2013 11:18 AM
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jencam

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Originally posted by: ronac
I agreed that should learn C prior to other languages.
By learning C, you will get to understand all the things "under-hood" from low-level perspective, just for example, memory management, pointers ... etc.


I passed this over to my son. His reply is that kids should learn C for programming microcontrollers where issues like memory management and pointers are important but it's not good as a first language for programming computers. The reason is that it's quite low level and numerous libraries are required to create a program that will do anything useful, and these libraries vary considerably from system to system. He thinks that kids need to start off with programming languages that are easy to create a functional and useful piece of software with the minimum of extra libraries or worries about low level features such as pointers. Ideally it will be open source (so forget C#) and one that sees considerable use in the real world.
 07 November 2013 07:05 AM
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DanielJon

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I will suggest you to go for Java, as these days .net do not have lot of scope.

Android apps are developed using Java and all major products are developed using the same, on the other hand websites and small projects are done with PHP or HTML5 now. .net is stuck between these two and hence it seems to be an outdated technology

-------------------------
Daniel Jones
http://www.kiwitech.com
 08 November 2013 10:50 AM
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williamjack

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I will suggest you Java. Most of the applications are developed in Java. Java has much better scope than .Net.
 15 November 2013 06:17 AM
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edwinjarvis

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Java is vast & best..........
 26 November 2013 03:25 PM
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DavyJones

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Great reply DanielJon

Completely agree with every word, .Net is stuck between Java and PHP/HTML5.
 30 November 2013 10:56 PM
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carloslorenzo

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Definitely Java instead of .NET but certainly you should know want you want to do first.

-------------------------
Carlos Lorenzo
'barcelonaphotoblog.com'
 31 December 2013 05:32 AM
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hjeff045

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I suggest you java because you can build more better applicaion or software with java compare with .net. The salary of java app developer is also more then .net developer.

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https://au.igrads.com
 31 December 2013 07:34 AM
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philipoakley

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go FORTH and multiply they said.

3 2 * .
6

Try having a look at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/F...(programming_language) http://www.forth.com/forth/ or http://www.forth.org/ for a completely fresh was of looking at programming compared to almost all the other (procedural based) FORTRAN clones (also look at functional programming).

The point being that that many of these programming language wars are somewhat superficial as to what feature is considered important, which often miss the fundamental commonalities of the majority.

For students: it's actually easier to learn the fundamentals and make a step toward any point on the circumference of knowledge than it is to learn your way all around the circumference (2pi ~ 6 times as many things to learn that way!)

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philip oakley
 23 February 2014 11:52 AM
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lasith

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I think the selection of programming language depends on many factors.

1 - What you want to do. - Eg: Mathematical modelling: Matlab, Minitab might be much easier for you rather than coding the same formulas from the scratch in Java or in .NET , Web Application development, AI, Image Processing etc.

2 - Your budget. - Not all the tools are free. Eg: for Java you might be able to find a lot of free and really good GUIs to help coding(Net Beans, Eclipse). But for .NET I feel its Microsoft Visual Studio which is the best GUI available in the market for .NET development and which is not free for commercial use. Still if you are a shell geek or like to code in the hard way using pure text editors and command line compilers GUIs don't matter.

3 - Your skill set. - If you are currently familiar with C++ development, you have almost the same syntax in .NET if you use C++.NET. The learning time will be much less compared to learning a new syntax. Again this depends on how fast you can learn a new syntax.

4 - The speed or the performance you require. - This also differs from programming language to language depending on the level it is running. The closer to the machine language the faster and the higher the performance of your application. The speed depends on the algorithms and optimizations in code as well, yet in general low level languages perform well compared to high level languages.

If you think you should follow the trend in selecting a language I think its not the correct path. You should think of the above facts (there can be many others as well ) and then decide on which is the best language to do the task. For your knowledge its best to learn the programming concepts rather than a language. Select the language according to the problem. Learn the principles.

-------------------------
Lasith Fernando)
Assistant Director | Information Technology
Central Bank of Sri Lanka
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