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Topic Title: HTML5 and video codecs
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Created On: 28 June 2010 07:51 AM
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 28 June 2010 07:51 AM
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jencam

Posts: 608
Joined: 06 May 2007

What are your thoughts on HTML5 and the WebM (VP8), H.264, and Dirac video codecs? Do you think that they will replace Flash for incorporating video material into websites or do you think that a new format war will emerge where the major web browsers end up using different codecs? Is it likely that WebM (VP8) will be killed as an open source format (in the United States at least) by patent lawyers finding that it infringes patents? Steve Jobs is reported to have made a remark that ALL video compression codecs contain patented technologies.

Has anybody had any experience with the Dirac codec that uses Wavelet compression rather than the discrete cosine transform?
 05 July 2010 01:14 AM
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deleted_1_Nimer

Posts: 223
Joined: 22 April 2006

I personally haven't seen WebM (VP8) or Dirac codecs for the web yet, but I can tell you for a fact that H.264 isn't exactly something new on the internet; Flash videos are nothing more than modified MP4 files that use H.264 compression.

As a matter of fact, one can simply rename an FLV file to an MP4 file; guaranteed, if you have the necessary H.264 codec installed on your computer, you will be able to play the video file.

Anyways, judging by the prevalence of Flash as a standard in internet applications (along with the fact that HTML 5 is still in an experimental stage,) I don't see HTML 5 sweeping the world wide web by storm (at least not yet). I doubt that a new format war will emerge as HTML 5 is actually supposed to eliminate the need for specific applet, video & audio formats to be used. An excellent example would be Google's 30th anniversary Pac-Man game, embedded in their logo.

It's nothing more than internal & external JavaScript code (to divide & control two image files to work as a system of sprites) & one Flash SWF file (containing sound effects & music) with some ActionScript. As a result, if the JavaScript & ActionScript code is copied onto any other web page using a different W3C standard, it will work as long as the client supports JavaScript (or else the sprite effect won't work) & Flash (or else the music won't play).

With HTML 5, one can eliminate the client's need for Flash to play background music, as well as eliminate the client's need to enable JavaScript to achieve the proper graphical effects; all the necessary functions would exist in HTML code to accomplish all this.

That said, JavaScript, Flash, Java & so many other client-sided programming/scripting languages have become too prevalent to disappear in one shot once HTML 5 is finalised; even W3C's website states that all web browsers should still maintain support for legacy HTML standards. That said, because so many companies would still be using the legacy standards on their servers (or some kind of HTML code that isn't W3C compliant,) how will they be able to deliver interactive content without overhauling their websites? And that will cost them quite a bit.

-------------------------
Technology: something that's hated & cursed at by all engineers, technologists & technicians!

( Lousy modern technology! )

Edited: 05 July 2010 at 01:21 AM by deleted_1_Nimer
 14 July 2010 11:15 PM
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jencam

Posts: 608
Joined: 06 May 2007

Originally posted by: NimerAnyways, judging by the prevalence of Flash as a standard in internet applications (along with the fact that HTML 5 is still in an experimental stage,) I don't see HTML 5 sweeping the world wide web by storm (at least not yet).


Web browsers that support the HTML5 <video> tag have been around for about a year now but are still not available from Microsoft.

I doubt that a new format war will emerge as HTML 5 is actually supposed to eliminate the need for specific applet, video & audio formats to be used.


The video and audio codecs are not part of the HTML5 spec. A minor format war has existed between Theora and H.264. Firefox and Opera support Theora but will not support H.264. Safari supports H.264 but will not support Theora. Chrome supports both H.264 and Theora. IE 8 supports neither.

In May this year WebM was released as a third video file format. Dirac has been around for some time as well as a fourth video file format.
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