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Topic Title: What to Specialise in Electronics Engineering??
Topic Summary: Guidance
Created On: 25 November 2013 09:21 PM
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 25 November 2013 09:21 PM
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opmelectronics

Posts: 14
Joined: 26 October 2013

What to Specialize in Electronics Engineering??

I am a recent graduate and have covered loads of areas

I want to know were is the future of electronics going

I want to specialize in one area and master it and after years of practical experience and work experience I want to start my own consultancy my own business ......My MAIN goal is to start up my own business .....

I currently work in servicing medical equipment but in my own time i build circuits and projects i find interesting...I have a 1st class degree in electronics and i have also started to learn to PIC program.

Please any help and guidance would be helpful

Please share your thoughts !!!!!
 26 November 2013 02:41 AM
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kengreen

Posts: 400
Joined: 15 April 2013

I believe that your approach to this problem is wrong at the start.

Are you aware of that classic definition of the specialist? One who learns more and more about less and less and ultimately ends up knowing everything - about nothing?

Frankly if you want the kind of success that you outline then the one essential is that you become an ENGINEER . It is only the rare such as Barnes Wallis who can rightly claim to be specialist - for us mere mortals there is no such thing. To be successful and run your own business it is essential that you can transfer problems between disciplines; the best example I can offer in this field is the modern railway carriage that runs smoothly and mostly silently without jerking and jolting from side to side as did the early models. As I learned this it was achieved by converting the mechanical parameters into electrical/electronic parameters and then redesigning the railway carriage has a bandpass circuit - i.e. critically damped.

Ken Green
 26 November 2013 07:32 PM
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opmelectronics

Posts: 14
Joined: 26 October 2013

thank you for your reply

I guess i didnt think it through because the example you gave at end reminded me of things created today that came from nature....

I am a bit confused tbh as i enjoy building and testing circuits and in future will work on mechanical engineering but dont know how in the future this could lead to my own business.......
 27 November 2013 04:20 AM
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kengreen

Posts: 400
Joined: 15 April 2013

Ha! There you have it on a fundamental difficulty. We none of us can know where our careers will dump us..

I'm glad to hear that you build and experiment with electronic circuits; but do you ever wonder exactly why, and how, they work. Yes, we all know (hopefully) of the explanations that you can find in any textbook but never believe that, because it has been published in book form, then it must of necessity be correct.

For example: a simple oscillator. Why does it oscillate and why does it not drive itself off the planet? The first answer to that question is that it needs a positive-feedback circuit to make it oscillate and then there must be an overriding negative-feedback circuit to control the wild spirit of that energetic arrangement.

Then again you can do a simple mathematical analysis of your circuit (in terms perhaps of current in and either voltage or current output which is fed back to the input) and discover that the effective result is that you have a negative resistance at the input. Oh yes, in terms of common sense, that is a piece of NON-sense - it indicates that if you raise the voltage so the current will fall? But it does give a new perspective on the "simple" oscillator?

If you think about it enough you will realise that there are two kinds of generators: one which generates an EMF which, in turn, pushes an electric current around any connected load: the second type generates an electric current which, in turn, generates a potential difference across any connected load. These are enshrined respectively in Thevenin's and in Norton's theorems without which circuit design would be impossible - you are in the land of suck-it-and-see?

I hope that I have not confused you?

Ken Green
 27 November 2013 07:22 PM
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opmelectronics

Posts: 14
Joined: 26 October 2013

loool oww man you have confused me .......I kind of get what you mean but it hast really answered my question......

but i would like to know your thoughts on the future of electronics
 27 November 2013 11:48 PM
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kengreen

Posts: 400
Joined: 15 April 2013

Yes,

Your confusion arises from a lack of study in fundamental principles. For example had you heard before, and can you make intelligence use of, both Thevenin's and Norton's theorems. Do you understand the difference between EMF ,PD and Voltage?

Send me an e-mail address and I will provide a good grounding in such matters.

Ken Green
 28 November 2013 08:57 AM
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Zuiko

Posts: 521
Joined: 14 September 2010

Originally posted by: kengreen

Are you aware of that classic definition of the specialist? One who learns more and more about less and less and ultimately ends up knowing everything - about nothing?
Ken Green


That's not the classic definition - it is the Kenneth Williams' defintion!
 28 November 2013 10:49 AM
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kengreen

Posts: 400
Joined: 15 April 2013

Well Zuiko,

Just look at the name !

Ken Green
 28 November 2013 07:02 PM
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opmelectronics

Posts: 14
Joined: 26 October 2013

I have sent you my email in a private PM and funny enough i have a 1st class electronics degree

Yes and No is all i can say

but you have made me think and I realize i might have to go back to the basics/fundamentals and try understand things for myself in my own way......
 28 November 2013 07:26 PM
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kengreen

Posts: 400
Joined: 15 April 2013

I think you for the courtesy of sending me your email address; let's hope that I do not waste your time.

There is nothing funny at all in your first-class degree; on the contrary you are to be congratulated but, from your replies so far, I think it very likely that you have been given the usual confused string of explanations without a coherent overall treatment.

I will send you a copy of the correspondence course with which I encouraged many young people into the craft of electronic engineering. You will find that it starts in the lowest possible level as it introduces students who have never before studied physics of any kind; it is up to you to pick the bones out of it.

It is the distillation of most of the understanding that I have picked up in my 70-years as an electronics engineer but which led me into a much broader spectrum.

Ken Green
 28 November 2013 07:39 PM
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opmelectronics

Posts: 14
Joined: 26 October 2013

Thank you

and will be looking foward to it
 29 November 2013 08:34 AM
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IanDarney

Posts: 32
Joined: 18 January 2003

Have you investigated the 'Careers Development' links at the bottom of the IET forums page ?

It might be an idea to register with LinkedIn.

One way of keeping up with developments in the field is to subscribe to Electronics World.

Ian Darney
 30 November 2013 10:36 AM
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Adminsmith

Posts: 3
Joined: 30 November 2013

nice content shared by the writer ....... keep it up
....

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[url=Link removed/products/1/transformers]Power transformers[/url]
 01 December 2013 07:18 PM
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jencam

Posts: 608
Joined: 06 May 2007

Some advice from my son

The best approach is to find out what is out there then pick whatever you find interesting that appears to have reasonably good career prospects. Engineers go through different phases of what interests them throughout their lives so only a handful specialise in one area for all of their life. Always keep up with developments by reading magazines such as Electronics World or websites such as EE Times.
 03 December 2013 03:37 PM
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martinjdw

Posts: 5
Joined: 11 January 2003

I have done exactly what you are talking about! Wareham Engineering It's taken 20 years to get to this point in my career and I couldn't be happier with it. A lot of it is luck but I agree with the previous post, choose something that interests you (in my case I was fascinated from an early age by the sea, and what was beneath it). If you can, travel around the world and enjoy yourself with your chosen specialisation, learn as much as you can from everybody you meet and eventually you'll have enough information in your head and enough experience to do something better than any other company does. Then it's time to start up on your own. Good luck! Martin
 24 December 2013 04:13 AM
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plcautomation

Posts: 4
Joined: 23 December 2013

Electronics engineering, or electronic engineering, is an engineering discipline where non-linear and active electrical components such as electron tubes, and semiconductor devices, especially transistors, diodes and integrated circuits, are utilized to design electronic circuits, devices and systems, typically also including passive electrical components and based on printed circuit boards. The term denotes a broad engineering field that covers important subfields such as analog electronics, digital electronics, consumer electronics, embedded systems and power electronics.
 07 January 2014 10:00 AM
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Morgen

Posts: 3
Joined: 24 December 2013

Electronic Engineering is very helpful for the economy of any company and any country.i which many techniques apply for the best output.i think this is very important information for the every technical minded person.i wanna discus on this topic.Thanks for sharing this information.
Extended Stay Hotel Oceanside
 03 April 2014 03:02 AM
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llondel

Posts: 10
Joined: 08 January 2012

If you specialise you are stuck with a narrow field and if technology changes, you can be left high and dry. If you stick to general engineering then you get to play with all of it. If (for example) you wanted to learn about switch mode power supplies, you could become an expert in specifying and designing them, but there may come a time when you'd rather do something different and that's all you've ever done of note, you'd have a hard time changing to something else. Of course, if you want to become a self-employed consultant in the field, the specialisation is good, at least until your expertise becomes obsolete or you get bored.

I'm my eighth job now and I've managed to switch field each time. Previous knowledge is always useful, and the core concepts are valid whether it's RF, analogue or digital, and give you enough of a start to keep you going as you learn the quirks of the new job. I have an 80:20 rule - if I can do 80% of what it says in a job description then that's about right - it's enough to keep me productive while I learn the 20%, which is the bit that benefits me because it's interesting and improves my skillset.
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