IET
Decrease font size
Increase font size
Topic Title: Open University Engineering
Topic Summary: Engineering Mathematics
Created On: 14 February 2010 06:03 PM
Status: Read Only
Linear : Threading : Single : Branch
Search Topic Search Topic
Topic Tools Topic Tools
View similar topics View similar topics
View topic in raw text format. Print this topic.
 14 February 2010 06:16 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



paulskyrme

Posts: 758
Joined: 12 February 2003

Neil,
I did my BSc(Hons) & MEng witht the OU.
I had done an apprenticeship with C&G then an HNC after this before my OU study.
Please talk to the OU, face to face if possible, go to a couruse choice event.
I spoke to the regional head of technology on a 121 basis.
I explained my background and his words were "p**s" off over there do M101, & MST204 then come back to see me!
So I did, we became good friends & I am still in touch with him now, he has left the OU as have I, and he was an honest & valuable guide through my study.
See also OU recognition leaflet 3.3 (unless the no. has changed!)

PM if you want to discuss further, always will try to help anyone who genuinely wants to better themselves.

I was geniuinely sat here a few minutes ago reading some other stuff and came to the decision I REALLY WANT to do a PhD, but how and in what I don't know, but I finally decided tonight that I want to.
Next, how to afford it, in what, how, and how the heck do I fit it in with running my own co 70+ hrs per week!

HTH

Paul
 14 February 2010 07:42 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



westonpa

Posts: 1771
Joined: 10 October 2007

I also did the M101 which covered general maths and did the summer school as well. I did look at the OU again a few years back but thought their 'project' options were a bit limited and preferred the wider variety offered by the universities. There are an increasing number of universities which offer distance learning degrees and thus you should search around and consider them all. Check the OU credit for previous study pages and you will be able to work out the extra study required for one of their degrees.

As for Paul and his desire to do a PhD and work 70+ hours per week, I say "Superman move over, there's a new guy on the block!"

Regards.
 14 February 2010 07:48 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



neilbuss

Posts: 26
Joined: 06 June 2008



Thank you for your help Paul. It looks like I am on the right track with my thoughts with the mathematics. You have done very well and climb the ladders.

Yes! I would go for the PHD although it is hard work it will get open alot of door especially in top R & D jobs.

Regards

Neil Bussey
 14 February 2010 10:41 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



neilbuss

Posts: 26
Joined: 06 June 2008



In reply to your statement most good Engineers are super men because they are tested to the extremes in terms of mathematics, problem solving ability and communications. In Britain engineers are sometimes looked upon as nerds, but this is very far from the truth.

Regards

Neil Bussey

Edited: 02 December 2010 at 09:55 PM by neilbuss
 15 February 2010 06:22 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



paulskyrme

Posts: 758
Joined: 12 February 2003

westonpa,
I WANT to, but I don't think it will happen somehow!
Paul
 17 February 2010 01:19 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



mbirdi

Posts: 1907
Joined: 13 June 2005

You can always do the OU degree in Physical Sciences (Physics). I'm sure this would be recognised by the IET and IoP. It covers both science and Maths.
 25 February 2010 10:08 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message


Avatar for JamesGarrity.
JamesGarrity

Posts: 17
Joined: 12 February 2010

Hi Paul (also know an Superman)

Why don't you contact the Enginerring department at the OU and discuss doing a part time PhD?

http://engineering.open.ac.uk/

From the research that I'd done in doing a PhD they do a 6 year distance learning one where you don't have to love in MK; yes I am considering doing one as well.

-------------------------
James Garrity BEng (Hons) MIET
 25 February 2010 10:12 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message


Avatar for JamesGarrity.
JamesGarrity

Posts: 17
Joined: 12 February 2010

Originally posted by: wilson479
Don't hold out much hope for IET accreditation any time soon.


Hi

You might find the OU Engineering web page interesting

"we have agreed to apply for full accreditation by the IET (and the IMechE may join in the process) in 2010."

http://engineering.open.ac.uk/news Accessed 25/02/2010

-------------------------
James Garrity BEng (Hons) MIET
 28 February 2010 11:11 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



westonpa

Posts: 1771
Joined: 10 October 2007

The problem is that an increasing number of students do not want to do the 'heavy' maths and principles stuff anymore and thus if there is no take up on the 'tough' modules the universities, and not only the OU, drop them......because they are now run primarily as businesses and not as education centres. Some of the tutors at my current university have said they are under pressure from the 'corporate/business' side of the university to drop or tone down the 'tough' modules because students complain about them.

Regards.
 01 March 2010 06:57 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



westonpa

Posts: 1771
Joined: 10 October 2007

"It's not about "tough" and "easy" modules."

In relation to:

Topic Title: Open University Engineering
Topic Summary: Engineering Mathematics

My comments are from a university tutor who was an OU engineering tutor some time ago, when modules were phased out due to low take up, and from current university tutors at one of the UK's oldest universities and from my own experiences of doing OU maths/engineering modules. I am not arguing against the 'accreditation' related points, which are perfectly valid, but am giving relevant opinions of tutors who speak in terms of 'tough' and 'easy' modules and which have an affect on other decisions.

Regards.
 08 April 2010 12:16 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



PotentialStudent

Posts: 1
Joined: 16 September 2009

I amplaning to start my engineering studies at university. but the problems is I don't know which university offers the best modules and allow me to get good experience. I was hoping to study Computer systems Engineering.. is there any suggestiongs that might help in my choices? so far i have QM, City and aston universities on my list.
 08 April 2010 01:46 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



westonpa

Posts: 1771
Joined: 10 October 2007

Originally posted by: PotentialStudent

I amplaning to start my engineering studies at university. but the problems is I don't know which university offers the best modules and allow me to get good experience. I was hoping to study Computer systems Engineering.. is there any suggestiongs that might help in my choices? so far i have QM, City and aston universities on my list.


If you choose an engineering HNC, HND, Degree, etc., with a UK university then the best modules will be the ones you are most interested in....so check the course content. Computer systems engineering is a good subject to choose. With regards to potential experience contact the relevant universities and ask them what they offer....there are a variety of schemes and each will explain their own if you ask. My advice though is do not take everything on face value, and thus rely on some phone conversation with one tutor because sometimes they use poetic licence to get students onto their courses. So if possible check their websites to see if what they say is in writing or check their paper literature to see if it's in there or get them to email it to you. Basically do not take verbal on face value and always do your research on what you are being told.....search Google, speak with past students, etc.

My son is doing a similar subject at Nottingham Trent and he loves it and is just about to start his 'experience' year where basically he goes out to work for a year. He has to apply for the jobs, and of course this is in itself training for after the course, but the university both assist and have relevant contacts and networks and so on. Basically he has to do his part but with university assistance and guidance.

Regards.
Statistics

See Also:



FuseTalk Standard Edition v3.2 - © 1999-2014 FuseTalk Inc. All rights reserved.