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Topic Title: UPS
Topic Summary: Max Output Current
Created On: 02 December 2011 10:58 AM
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 02 December 2011 10:58 AM
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cdaly2001

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Joined: 14 August 2010

What will happen if you try and use a UPS that is rated as 1.1 A max out current to supply a system that demands 2.5 amps? Will the UPS just discharge faster or will the system fail?
 02 December 2011 11:18 AM
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ArthurHall

Posts: 736
Joined: 25 July 2008

both.
If it tries to supply the load the batteries will discharge quicker but the output electronics will be overloaded and will probably fail. If the unit has output protection it will just sit down and give no output.
 02 December 2011 11:20 AM
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cdaly2001

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What about using two UPS in parallel?
 02 December 2011 11:20 AM
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cdaly2001

Posts: 5
Joined: 14 August 2010

What about using two UPS in parallel?
 02 December 2011 11:52 AM
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gkenyon

Posts: 4478
Joined: 06 May 2002

Originally posted by: cdaly2001

What about using two UPS in parallel?
Not possible for a number of reasons, unless the manufacturer has specifically stated it can be done with their range of products.

What about a bigger UPS?

-------------------------
Eur Ing Graham Kenyon CEng MIET TechIOSH
 02 December 2011 11:58 AM
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cdaly2001

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That would be the ideal solution but the customer needs a non battery type UPS and the only one in our range is 1.1A. Just out of interest what are the reasons?
I knew it was a long shot :-)
 04 December 2011 02:23 PM
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oneye

Posts: 165
Joined: 25 February 2008

"...customer needs a non battery type UPS.."
What kind of energy source would your customer be looking for ?

You have not stated voltage.
If it's 230vAC then at 1.1 amp is not exactly a large UPS.
 04 December 2011 05:41 PM
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gkenyon

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Originally posted by: cdaly2001

That would be the ideal solution but the customer needs a non battery type UPS and the only one in our range is 1.1A. Just out of interest what are the reasons?

I knew it was a long shot :-)
To link the UPS together, you'd need to statisfy a number of criteria:

1. Output voltages can be "phase-locked", so they are both rising and falling precisely together.

2. Need to make sure one can't back-feed the other in any way.

3. May need to make sure that the frequencies of the switching converters are precisely the same and are phase-locked too, otherwise may mean that the voltage/current output generates a lot of noise: EMC issues.

But surely if this is in your range, your tech guys know the answer?

-------------------------
Eur Ing Graham Kenyon CEng MIET TechIOSH
 05 December 2011 07:53 PM
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mike.mcclory

Posts: 30
Joined: 26 April 2006

If you try to overload a UPS by that much the chances are that the output protection will trip either from the over-current or output voltage droop. You could probably find some way to parallel them, buy why add that level of complication?
IET » Control and automation » UPS

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