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Topic Title: cable gland
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Created On: 08 June 2011 02:02 PM
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 08 June 2011 02:02 PM
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delaw

Posts: 4
Joined: 08 June 2011

What are the benefits of cable glands and how can it be used in different circumstances ?
 08 June 2011 02:28 PM
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Avatar for dougflorence                                      .
dougflorence

Posts: 74
Joined: 25 July 2008

Keep dirt, liquids and vermin out of control cabinets.
Provide mechanical security and attachment for cables at point of entry to cabinet.
Can provide electrical termination of screens and armour.
 17 December 2011 12:47 AM
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delaw

Posts: 4
Joined: 08 June 2011

Please how can cable glands be used in different circumstances ?if possible,I will appreciate a reference material.
 06 January 2012 09:12 PM
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seanastacey

Posts: 15
Joined: 01 June 2010

If you look into COMPEX it states what glands should be used for different areas. Different glands need to be used in different areas if the area you are installing the equipment is classed as a hazardous area i.e. has flammable substances near.
Typically instrumentation cables that are intrinsically safe (have a galvonic isolator) use IP 55 barriers to keep the seal of the equipment. For other equipment e.g. motors, glands may require to be ATEX approved and have the corrent rating for the zone the equipments in e.g. EEx d - which means its explosion protected they also have a temperature class and gass group where they can be installed in. A COMPEX course is worth looking into for more on this info.
 09 March 2012 05:35 PM
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adamtaylor

Posts: 54
Joined: 08 December 2009

There are many types of glands you could look up on the internet and/or in books. Start looking at the different materials that they are made of (E:G: - Plastic, Brass, Stainless steel, etc). This normally tells you a lot about the gland and what its capabilities are!

If you are looking for an example of a common gland that is used, look at FLP glands (Theres loads on the internet). We use these glands on any cables that are in areas where any fuels are being used or a high risk of fire.

Adam

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Fail to prepare...Prepare to fail!

Adam
 24 March 2012 08:59 PM
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eclectica

Posts: 63
Joined: 16 August 2010

A relatively recent innovation are IP68 rated cable glands which encorporate a Gore-tex breathing membrane. This way your enclosure remains free of condensed moisture as the enclosure can breathes dry air as temperatures (and pressure inside the enclosure) change throughout the day.

Beautiful for outdoor enclosed sensitive electronic equipment/ data loggers/ monitoring equipment etc. I have been using products by Wiska which are stocked at most Edmundsons branches.

Eclectica.

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 21 May 2012 10:10 AM
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phayton

Posts: 9
Joined: 03 January 2006

Cable glands, where these are used to terminate steel wire amour power cable between a motors and inverter drive, the gland forms a low impedance electrical connection.
These glands are carrying high frequency leakage currents, between the motor body and the inverter drive chassis, and form the preferred route. Failure to complete connection effectively, this will cause these high frequency signals to contaminate power supplies, instrumentation and control systems.
Typical symptoms being fluctuating instrumentation, PLC inputs 'toggling' and interruption of serial communications.
 21 May 2012 10:50 AM
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StewartTaylor

Posts: 99
Joined: 18 January 2003

Eclectica,

Be careful in your use of gore-tex membrane glands. They will prevent the ingress of liquid water, but will not prevent ingress of water vapourr in humid air (that's how the sweat gets out in your breathable waterproofs). If you have conditions that swing from warm and wet to really cold you'll still get condensation, how much just depends on how much breathing your box is doing.

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Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away.
 12 June 2012 12:25 PM
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Jonni1987

Posts: 9
Joined: 01 July 2011

I have used mainly HAWK glands in my experience; they are really easy to use and extremely robust. They design them for the relevant hazardous area's i.e. Exd, etc.

Glands can and are used for earthing termination in conjunction with banjo's and locking nuts. When using SWA cable, the armoring can be used as an earth, relate to BS 7671: 2008 section 543.2.5.
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