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Topic Title: Can you build a new business out of an old technology?
Topic Summary: How can we reuse the BBC's National Analogue Radio Transmitters without breaking the law after Digital Switchover?
Created On: 20 May 2013 01:44 PM
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 20 May 2013 01:44 PM
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jarathoon

Posts: 1040
Joined: 05 September 2004

This post is inspired by a BBC web page entitled

"Press rewind: The cassette tape returns" By Kate Dailey (BBC, Montreal)

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-22533522

"Join the discussion
Can you build a new business out of an old technology?

Join @BBCBusiness in a live Twitter Q&A on Monday 20 May at 1600 BST (1100 EST) to discuss how one company, successfully selling cassette tapes, has done just that.

You can send us your questions using the form at the bottom of this page or via Twitter using the hashtag #BBCrunningabusiness"




Something I have also now read the 'Digital Economy Act 2010" in regards to the National Analogue Radio Switch Off.

http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2010/24/section/30

According to the law as now enacted the only organisations that can now have any influence over the government are Ofcom and the BBC. Ofcom it appears want to stay out of the fight, so that just leaves the BBC.

The analogue switch off is accomplished by Ofcom withdrawing National Broadcast licences in the AM and FM band. But FM can't be broadcast as a national signal it has always been a mosaic of local transmissions.

So the law as currently written can legally be circumvented by applying for a full deck of local fm broadcast licences and using clever audio automation tricks to make all these 'local broadcasts for local people' different enough to obey the Ofcom content censorship rules. (Sorry I used to live near Hadfield)

So with the right technology the "FM Band Heritage Radio UK" consortium can buy the complete FM national transmitter network from the BBC and continue to broadcast nationally by using a mosaic of multi-symbiotic virtual broadcast stations.

James Arathoon


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James Arathoon
 20 May 2013 02:00 PM
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jarathoon

Posts: 1040
Joined: 05 September 2004

a 'mosaic of polysymbiotic virtual broadcast stations' sounds better perhaps

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James Arathoon
 20 May 2013 06:01 PM
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jarathoon

Posts: 1040
Joined: 05 September 2004

The first idea I have received, for a new business based on an old idea, is for an Independent TV Production Company:

Following the success of the BBC TV "Olympic" comedy '2012', it has been suggested that the '2015' franchise of the show should be sold on so that an Independent TV production company can parody the run up to digital radio switchover at the BBC, Ofcom and The Department of Culture Media and Sport.

I had to point out that the orchestration of the digital radio switchover has already become a series of sophisticated self-parodies, and all we would do is potentially ruin the whole thing by attempting to parody these self-parodies, which in turn could be parodied much better than the original parody itself.

Anyway if some characters in the show were to implicitly believe the statement "We are living in the best of all possible digital worlds", it's not the sort of joke the cultural elite in this country would find very funny.

Besides I am a fan of Leibniz, and I don't want to have my loyalties strained, if the whole Leibniz vs. Voltaire 'Candide 'affair is reignited anew in the digital age.

In this regard, I must admit that, I haven't found a philosophically robust way of completely divorcing the digital world from the analogue 'real' world, so the two arguments may in fact be interconnected in more than just a metaphorical way.

James Arathoon


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James Arathoon
 21 May 2013 10:39 PM
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jarathoon

Posts: 1040
Joined: 05 September 2004

I've just got notice of a complementary invite to join the studio audience of "BBC Dara O Briain's Science Club"

I've sent the links to some of my posts here on to the BBC and so shall see if I get a response.

I have yet to receive even an acknowledgement to an email I sent to the Department of Culture, Media and Sport.

James Arathoon

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James Arathoon
 25 May 2013 10:21 AM
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normcall

Posts: 8111
Joined: 15 January 2005

Just trying to think how long you might have to wait until radio equipment using standard FM between 86 and 107 is in the minority as DAB (using the old band 3 TV frequencies) is struggling to gain any of the promised listener numbers (might have something to do with rubbish quality and high current consumption) and great chunks of Band 1 are sitting unused.

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Norman
 25 May 2013 05:47 PM
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jarathoon

Posts: 1040
Joined: 05 September 2004

Originally posted by: normcall

Just trying to think how long you might have to wait until radio equipment using standard FM between 86 and 107 is in the minority as DAB (using the old band 3 TV frequencies) is struggling to gain any of the promised listener numbers (might have something to do with rubbish quality and high current consumption) and great chunks of Band 1 are sitting unused.


The only way is to look at market trends on the Rajar sites

http://www.rajar.co.uk/content...=listen_market_trends

March 2013 figures just out
Analogue listening is at 60.5 percent on a falling trend
DAB listening is at 22.5 percent on a slightly rising trend.

The trouble is with these figures is that the DAB trends upwards, correlate extremely well with the increase in the "% who claim to have ever listened to radio via mobile phone".

You can only listen to radio on a mobile phone via FM or internet streaming or podcasts.

I can't help thinking that there is some confusion going on, with people mistakenly claiming that they have been listening to DAB when they have actually been listening to FM on a mobile phone, or to FM on a DAB/FM radio.

Rajar themselves admit that the "Digital Unspecified" and "Unspecified" categories are needed because of this confusion, and this is just the level of confusion that they admit to.

"*Inevitably, there is a certain amount of unspecified listening because either the respondent is unsure, or it is not always possible for them to know whether the station to which they are listening is being broadcast on analogue or digital, or via which platform. Every effort is made by RAJAR to ensure the instructions given to both interviewers and respondents elicit the highest possible volume of specified analogue/digital stations and platforms."

However Rajar do not freely publish their data in a way that allows cross-checking and sanity checking particularly in regard to mobile or in car radio listening or mixed mode FM/DAB radio listening.

Even the BBC confuse people on this

http://www.bbc.co.uk/reception/digitalradio/

In answer to the question "How do I get digital radio?"

One of the answers is

"Mobile: listen on FM or if you have a connected phone you can listen to BBC digital radio stations via the IP connection. You can also listen to the BBC stations on an IOS phone with the new BBC iPlayer Radio app."

If you enjoy the digital radio hype, you have a chance here to watch all the commercials to "Spread the love for digital radio"

James Arathoon

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James Arathoon
 23 June 2013 09:17 PM
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jencam

Posts: 608
Joined: 06 May 2007

This probably comes across as ridiculous but a new breed of videophiles could be forming who think that old TV programmes only look authentic when viewed on a CRT - and preferably one from around the same era the programme was produced.
 07 August 2013 03:09 PM
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johnnmann

Posts: 53
Joined: 18 October 2006

Originally posted by: jarathoon


So the law as currently written can legally be circumvented by applying for a full deck of local fm broadcast licences and using clever audio automation tricks to make all these 'local broadcasts for local people' different enough to obey the Ofcom content censorship rules. (Sorry I used to live near Hadfield)



I think Heart are already doing this!
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