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Topic Title: Companies you can work for as an RF Engineer
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Created On: 26 September 2009 01:25 PM
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 26 September 2009 01:25 PM
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eswnl

Posts: 144
Joined: 29 November 2008

Hello,

Does anyone know what companies or the sort of companies to apply for as an RF Engineer.
I realise RF can be a very niche area so I imagine there's not that many jobs.

I'm on the verge of starting an MSC course in Wireless Communications and now I am getting cold feet about it. I was made redundant from my last job(Electrical Design Engineer) and its been 6 years since finishing my undergraduate degree in Electronics Engineering.
 01 October 2009 09:53 PM
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swoop720

Posts: 126
Joined: 28 October 2008

squallstar in the midlands maybee? im not sure if theyre still on the go ive been off the scene for a few yrs now
 06 November 2009 03:39 PM
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eswnl

Posts: 144
Joined: 29 November 2008

Thanks for the reply.

I'm currently doing an MSc in Wireless Communications systems engineering so I am trying to find out what careers one can go into.

I am not sure if "Wireless" means the same as "RF".
 09 November 2009 01:40 AM
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eswnl

Posts: 144
Joined: 29 November 2008

S Hakeem

Thanks for your lengthy input. It was worth reading.
 19 December 2009 05:06 PM
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alphanov

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Joined: 11 January 2002

Ofcom (the UK media regulator) have a graduate scheme that is currently recruiting. They have a reasonable number of RF engineers employed across their business.

-------------------------
alphanov
 20 December 2009 12:41 AM
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baduqail

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thanks sahakeem for the wonderful information...
 02 January 2010 04:10 PM
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ess1uk

Posts: 128
Joined: 20 April 2007

and Network Rail often has vancancies due to the GSMR roll out
try their site
 09 January 2010 12:33 PM
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devguhamazumder

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I need some trainning on RF enginnering
 09 January 2010 02:28 PM
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ess1uk

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what sort?
 21 July 2011 12:59 AM
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eswnl

Posts: 144
Joined: 29 November 2008

Originally posted by: sahakeem

I'm sorry to hear that you have been made redundant. As you posted your question in September, I imagine that you have started your MSc and that you may have more than a few answers from various sources by now.



If you are concerned about moving to RF Engineering in Wireless Communications from another area of electrical engineering, you should not be. Your electronic engineering degree and your electrical design experience can both only enhance your employability as a professional engineer in this (or any other) field. If not already registered, becoming Chartered really will enhance your employability.



Most wireless communications does seem to utilise Radio Frequency and microwave electromagnetic radiation rather than e.g. optical/lasers or ultrasound.



Despite the 'niche' image that RF engineering is seen as having by some other engineers, it is no more technically challenging than any other area of electrical engineering.

There should be no shortage of jobs in RF Engineering or in Wireless Communications, or in any related field in which you might find yourself specialising.

If you are not looking for a job in the UK there a plenty of employers in this field worldwide.

If you are British, you can of course work anywhere in the EU. Even if you join a company based in one country, RF and other engineers in most wireless industries can expect to find themselves working on various other continents from time to time.



I imagine that on (or before) graduating from your second degree (MSc in Wireless Communications) you may well find numerous employers interested in employing you. This was my experience when I studied and graduated from a MSc in a similar field quite a few years ago when the job market was recovering from a smaller slump than now. Most of my classmates on that MSc had the same experience.



My advice is that even if you do secure a suitable job before graduating from the MSc, it really will be in your best interest to make sure that you do graduate from the MSc, as having the second degree will help you with all the subsequent job applications that you make.



Regarding potential employers of RF Engineers in Wireless Communications (as opposed to e.g. radar), there are opportunities with every manufacturer of radio frequency equipment for e.g.:

    public land mobile networks (personal/mobile cellular phones) both wireless infrastructure and mobile stations (phones) - although I've heard that the UK-based opportunities in mobile phone handsets have dwindled.


    broadcasting equipment - both for the broadcaster and the consumer


    Consumer electronics


    All sorts of other terrestrial based wireless telecommunications infrastructure applications - e.g. equipment for microwave line-of-sight links


    All sorts of wireless equipment for IT-related applications, WiFi, WiMax, etc.


    (All manner of) military communications - recruitment in this field does seem unnaffected by the current recession - presumably owing to the long project cycles that I understand are associated with defence contracts. Actually, the space industry also operates on (not quite so) long time cycles - I imagine that recruitment in that industry may also be healthy right now.


    public safety communications - e.g. Tetra and Tetrapol equipment for the emergency services


    satellite communications - both ground segment and space segment. This is a much bigger field of engineering employment in the UK than some might expect.


    various government bodies - not all related to defence


    Industrial, Scientific & Medical (ISM) (i.e. licence-exempt) wireless equipment manufacturers.


    Maritime communications


    Wireless & RF/microwave test equipment


    Assorted engineering R&D labs, high-tech start-ups, university spin-offs, etc.


    various other fields that escape me right now.




As well as the equipment manufacturers, other companies that employ RF engineers in wireless communications, include the operators and users of the equipment and systems, those who put together communication systems, those who integrate systems and so on. As you will appreciate, there are various types of RF Engineering jobs available in wireless communications apart from RF/microwave design at the device, circuit, equipment, system and 'system of system' levels.

Moreover, I imagine that your Wireless Communications MSc will also allow you to specialise in areas other than microwave & RF circuits, antennas, propagation, etc. (E.g. DSP, software, telecommunications networks, navigatoin technologies, optical communications etc.)



The best way to identify employers of interest to you that are currently recruiting is to search the internet, e.g. on the numerous recruitment websites.



Some employers of RF Engineers in wireless communications that come to mind within the UK:

    Space-segment satellite communications: EADS Astrium (Portsmouth, Stevenage & Poynton), Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd. ('SSTL'), ComDev Europe (in Stoke Mandeville).


    Communication Satellite operators: Inmarsat in London, SSTL in Guildford, Astrium Services/Paradigm Secure/Paadigm Services e.g. in Stevenage.


    Defence: EADS Defence and Security, Thales (numerous locations countrywide), BAe Systems, ITT, Ultra Electronics (I think), Raytheon, Filtronic Defence.


    Mobile phone industry - all the operators that you have heard of plus any of the manufacturers that still employ engineers of your chosen specialisation in the UK. E,g, Nokia and Motorola both used to have UK-based cellular infrastructure divisions involved in e.g. base transceiver stations - in addition to their divisions involved in e.g. handsets/'mobile stations'.


    Public safety radio: Motorola in Basingstoke, EADS Defence & Security.


    Test equipment: Rohde & Schwartz (?), Agilent


    Marine applications - perhaps RayMarine of Portsmouth, Northrop Grumman Sperry Marine (mainly radar, I think).


    Assorted manufacturers: Filtronic Broadband, Cobham, Peak.




I have read that one of the best ways to find jobs is to cultivate a vast network of useful contacts, each of whom can refer you to several other useful contacts so that you grow a network geometrically. Apparently this 'intelligence network' of contacts allows you to identify possible employment opportunities, ideally before they are even advertised. Possible initial contacts could include students and academics from your MSc. The latter will have industry contacts. IET meetings, events, talks, etc are a good source of contacts, as are any job fairs, conferences or seminars that you attend.



I hope that this response is of some help, although I suspect that by now you may already be aware of much of the above.

All the best for the future.


After some experience of looking for jobs in this area, I can't seem to find hardly anything. Maybe there is something wrong with my job hunt.
 23 July 2011 02:28 PM
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jencam

Posts: 608
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Originally posted by: eswnl
After some experience of looking for jobs in this area, I can't seem to find hardly anything. Maybe there is something wrong with my job hunt.


Have you ever though about setting up your own website? A tip of advice from the home education community is that If you are having difficulty in finding suitable employment then one of the best solutions is to make yourself known to people who work in the industries you want to work in by setting up a website that functions as a portfolio of your knowledge and achievements. A personal page is essential but keep it on the sidelines because a truly successful website is one that isn't your autobiography but one that functions as a primary source of reference for people who are interested in the subject.
 30 July 2011 01:56 PM
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brobon

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Joined: 30 July 2011

Originally posted by: eswnl

Hello,



Does anyone know what companies or the sort of companies to apply for as an RF Engineer.

I realise RF can be a very niche area so I imagine there's not that many jobs.



I'm on the verge of starting an MSC course in Wireless Communications and now I am getting cold feet about it. I was made redundant from my last job(Electrical Design Engineer) and its been 6 years since finishing my undergraduate degree in Electronics Engineering.


How can i get your service .please tell me


Introduced to sleeping ear plugs
 19 October 2011 11:47 PM
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davidlturner

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Joined: 25 February 2011

Tait Communications in Huntingdon, Graduate schemes will be recruiting in Jan
 26 October 2011 01:19 AM
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eswnl

Posts: 144
Joined: 29 November 2008

Originally posted by: davidlturner

Tait Communications in Huntingdon, Graduate schemes will be recruiting in Jan


Thank you David.

I went to the European Microwave Exhibition in Manchester, so I managed to speak with many companies there.
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