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Topic Title: MiCC info
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Created On: 11 November 2005 11:24 PM
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 11 November 2005 11:24 PM
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Smith249

Posts: 362
Joined: 09 September 2004

Could someone explain to me the complete termination process along with a complete list of tools required to terminate it.
What does the 'ringer' tool do? I had a go stripping a bit with a joistripper, but it kept jamming and and the whole cable started twisting in the stripper as it was jammed!
 12 November 2005 12:22 AM
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pdcelec

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Ask you lecturer. After all, this is what they be showing you
 12 November 2005 06:58 AM
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normcall

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Very briefly -
I slide the gland on the cable, use the ringertool to mark where the pot will go, use a stripping tool to remove the copper sheath down to the pot position, use the potting tool to screw the pot onto the end of the cable, fill pot with compond, crimp the pot disc to the pot after sliding the cable insulation over the stubs, watch with satisfaction the compound oozz out, test insulation, fit gland over pot and screw into accessory/DB.

Well, that's how I've done it for the past 40 years.

-------------------------
Norman
 12 November 2005 08:54 AM
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tomgunn

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normcall ... youve done this before...

You can always use a knife for marking a line for the stripping to end... you can also make up a tool for stripping or use pliers.. side cutters are better really ... remember... NEVER blow into pot! Turn upside down and tap.... better to use a guide for putting pot on too... pull cores TIGHT with pliers!

Bets to cut off about a foot of the MICC and then do your term... I always use a tiny amount of grease, you can get them in little pots, and smear a lttle way down the MICC and use your guide to put pot on... easy this way... I always run my pliers around the MICC too... just to give the pot a chance and remember if your using shrouds... put them on first.. haha... how many time have I forgotten to do that....

Tom

-------------------------
Tom .... ( The TERMINATOR ).

handyTRADESMAN ... haha

Castle Builders

Why did Nick Clegg cross the road? Because he said he wouldn't!

I can resist anything..... except temptation! ( Karl Gunn ).

Edited: 12 November 2005 at 08:57 AM by tomgunn
 12 November 2005 09:52 AM
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normcall

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I did say briefly, didn't I.

-------------------------
Norman
 12 November 2005 06:52 PM
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Smith249

Posts: 362
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quote:

Originally posted by: pdcelec
Ask you lecturer. After all, this is what they be showing you


You jump to conclusions don't you, I would watch that, it could get you into trouble.

I am not doing an apprenticeship hence why I’m asking you fine folks.

Norman? You in a rush, why a brief reply?

What should the optimal insulation reading be?

Why is it that EVERY MICC installation I have seen is absolutely immaculately done, dead straight runs and the bends set like conduit, do you have to pass a “workmanship” course to be able to use the stuff? I think it looks amazing when installed, I would like to meet some of the people who install the stuff, the only sparks I’m around are house bashers.
I hope my work will be up to this level of craftsmanship when I use the stuff on a job.


 12 November 2005 07:10 PM
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SpaElectrical

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The skill comes with lots of grief and lots of practise - in that order!

Anyone remember fray bentos pies in round flattish tins? Or sardines come to that.

Remember the little handle thingy that came with each tin to get the lid off?

Well stripping pyro is similar - if you fail, you don't get any dinner!




-------------------------
"Let the evidence guide the research. Do not have a preconceived agenda which will only distort the result."
 12 November 2005 09:19 PM
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Jimoldham

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Personally, I prefer to use a screwdriver to strip MICC with.

-------------------------
Regards

Jim Oldham
 12 November 2005 09:20 PM
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Smith249

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Are we all in high school on this forum?
 12 November 2005 11:30 PM
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Igot3ears

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I haven't used Pyro for quite a few years now. Always use FP200 for fire alarms etc. Why would anyone still use Pyro anyway considering the high cost and time consuming installation methods? Does anyone here still use it?

3ears
 13 November 2005 12:33 AM
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Smith249

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It has to be used for the feed to petrol pumps.
It is way more tougher than FP200.
It lasts much longer.
It looks much better.
It is specified in higher quality specifications, where quality over price is the issue.
FP200 is solely a fire protected cable; it lacks all the mechanical strength of pyro.
Pyro is far better all round, loads of people still use it. It’s just rarely used for the contract type fire alarm systems, which are nowadays slapped in by anybody. Having said that it isn’t really necessary for basic fire systems, but some of the old school sparks still use it for this.
The job I have been asked to do has specified the stuff.
I have never used the stuff but I am looking forward too, unfortunately I was never taught how to terminate it
 13 November 2005 07:33 AM
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normcall

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When I was an apprentice in a large nationalised organisation many years ago, I used to work with anothe sparks at weekends etc. to get more experience (and money).
He used to do a lot of large industrial and taught me how to install pyro.
Only I got caught out when the forman came into the workshop to give out one of the few pyro jobs they got and found that no-one available had ever installed it.
You guessed, I piped up 'I can do that, sir'. 'When have you done any pyro work?' I was asked and thinking quickly, said I heard about it at college and asked one of the guys to show me.
So I had to go on the job and show one of the young 'qualified' sparks how to do it.

The learning curve is long and steep, always was and always will be.
Oh, by the way, don't forget you will flameproof glands and the boxes in the petrol pumps will need flameproof plugs.This was the common fault found when I used to test petrol pumps for the fire licence (when I was NICEIC approved of course). Many had been like that from new and through many annual 'inspections'. Try explaining that it will cost an arm and a leg to the site owner/manager to get his licence renewed due to others missing the obvious. They were not amused!!

-------------------------
Norman
 13 November 2005 11:35 AM
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OMS

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Interesting thread.

Anybody remember the dreadful "heat shrink" pot trialled in the '80s.

Regards

OMS

-------------------------
Failure is always an option
 13 November 2005 06:17 PM
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Clyde

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Just adding a comment based on feedback from another thread.

Is pyro suited to being submerged in water, and swa not suitable for submersion?
 13 November 2005 07:04 PM
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Jimoldham

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can we ask the type of installation that you will be using the MIMS on?

-------------------------
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Jim Oldham
 13 November 2005 07:09 PM
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Smith249

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I'm not using MIMS, I'm using MICC, its for some surface run exterior lighting.
 13 November 2005 09:56 PM
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Jimoldham

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Mineral Insulated copper covered - MICC used to be known as

Mineral Insulated Metal Sheathed - MIMS. This is now the correct term for it.

-------------------------
Regards

Jim Oldham
 13 November 2005 10:19 PM
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Jimoldham

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I must admith Alan Smith that i am some what puzzled by your answers on here when people have tried to give you advice.

I did a search on your previous postings, in which you say that you have lots of experience at MI cable terminating. and yet you are asking how to terminate.........

IF you would like advice then ask but at least be curtious when someone has taken the time to reply to you

-------------------------
Regards

Jim Oldham
 13 November 2005 10:26 PM
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stevetheelectrician

Posts: 230
Joined: 05 October 2005

quote:

Originally posted by: Igot3ears
I haven't used Pyro for quite a few years now. Always use FP200 for fire alarms etc. Why would anyone still use Pyro anyway considering the high cost and time consuming installation methods? Does anyone here still use it?



3ears


The need for pyro is still required for fire alarm wiring where enhanced fire resisting properties are required. Read clause 26 of BS5839 part1

Yes I still use it.
 13 November 2005 10:31 PM
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stevetheelectrician

Posts: 230
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quote:

Originally posted by: Smith249
It has to be used for the feed to petrol pumps.

It is way more tougher than FP200.

It lasts much longer.

It looks much better.

It is specified in higher quality specifications, where quality over price is the issue.

FP200 is solely a fire protected cable; it lacks all the mechanical strength of pyro.

Pyro is far better all round, loads of people still use it. It’s just rarely used for the contract type fire alarm systems, which are nowadays slapped in by anybody. Having said that it isn’t really necessary for basic fire systems, but some of the old school sparks still use it for this.

The job I have been asked to do has specified the stuff.

I have never used the stuff but I am looking forward too, unfortunately I was never taught how to terminate it



I does not have to be used to feed petrol pumps. ordinary pvc/swa/xlpe cable with suitable flameproof glands will do, read Institute of Petroleum Design and Modification of Petrol Filling Stations code of practice.

Sorry, just being pedantic!
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