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Topic Title: Ip65 enclosure
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Created On: 07 November 2015 10:09 PM
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 07 November 2015 10:09 PM
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21stcentury

Posts: 19
Joined: 18 December 2011

Hello all, has anyone got a solutions/recommendations for ventilating a metal IP65 enclosure......planning to fit 6 100watt PSU for 24volt LED tape in the enclosure (500x400x150) but would like to ventilate it if possible and maintain the IP rating.....enclosure mounted externally but under a canopy. Thanks in advance
 07 November 2015 11:10 PM
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24Hour

Posts: 271
Joined: 06 April 2006

Ip65 in metal for exterior applications, Ive never heard myself of such a beast.
Jäger do make a ventilator plus approx 6mm in diameter to fit on exterior ip rated fittings to allow water to drain out ,but by definition if you cut a hole you can't expect the ip rating not to be changed .
Have you thought about the transformers you can buy that are themselves ip56 rated .
If not what about a heat shrink mounted on the box it's self ?

-------------------------
Yes i do do 24/7 everyday of the FLAMIN year.
 08 November 2015 12:59 AM
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alancapon

Posts: 6942
Joined: 27 December 2005

I don't think you will keep your IP rating if you start cutting ventilation holes. You would be better off using the box as a heat sink, perhaps using a Peltier effect cooler to assist in the heat transfer.

Regards,

Alan.
 08 November 2015 03:05 PM
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jravenscroft

Posts: 73
Joined: 07 November 2015

Have you considered whether it will actually matter to loose the IP rating?

If the enclosure is sufficiently protected from the elements, then you could make your own judgement as to whether any modification you make to the already protected enclosure would cause an issue.

I'm assuming this is an already existing enclosure, in which case it goes without saying that the client would need to agree with this method.

Consider that junction boxes supplied with an IP rating are often found fixed to a wall/strut through holes having been drilled through the back (hopefully with a plastic/nylon/fiber washer or suitable sealant). I'm not saying this is ideal, and most of these systems will have a bracket or method of mounting which maintains the IP rating, but the point is that the installer has made a judgement, and the contents of the box are still adequately protected from the environment outside the box, which was the purpose. It isn't illegal/unethical to make your own assessment, and install accordingly.

I'd be more concerned about achieving proper airflow.
 08 November 2015 06:01 PM
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perspicacious

Posts: 7854
Joined: 18 April 2006

It isn't illegal/unethical to make your own assessment, and install accordingly.

I agree, but it makes life more comfortable should you end up gripping the bar that you can refer back to a recognised publication/standard rather than have to try and explain that a blob of mastic is just as good as not penetrating the enclosure

Regards

BOD
 08 November 2015 06:10 PM
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jravenscroft

Posts: 73
Joined: 07 November 2015

Originally posted by: perspicacious
I agree, but it makes life more comfortable should you end up gripping the bar that you can refer back to a recognised publication/standard rather than have to try and explain that a blob of mastic is just as good as not penetrating the enclosure


You're absolutely right, ofcourse. But there is certainly room for your own judgement. If something seems completely reasonable, then you should be able to stand by that when pushed.
 08 November 2015 06:13 PM
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perspicacious

Posts: 7854
Joined: 18 April 2006

If something seems completely reasonable, then you should be able to stand by that when pushed.

And hope that your PII will agree with you

Regards

BOD
 08 November 2015 07:05 PM
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Fm

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Joined: 24 August 2011

 08 November 2015 09:23 PM
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21stcentury

Posts: 19
Joined: 18 December 2011

Thanks Fm, that looks like what I'm after.
 08 November 2015 09:29 PM
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mapj1

Posts: 9707
Joined: 22 July 2004

In general if you really do want to cool a sealed box in the rain, which is truly IP65, then there is no way of doing it that involves the outside air and water being sucked into the box. Instead, one puts heatsink fins back to back inside and outside the box, and a fan inside circulates a fixed volume of internal air so the inside fins pick up the heat from the hotspots inside, and if required, a low voltage fan outside circulates the potentially wet outside air over the outside cooling fins.
It is corkingly expensive and inefficient to do this. If you can possibly get a solid metallic path between the hot spots and the outside of the box directly, then you should do so.
How many watts are you actually trying to sweat off, and from what - i.e. how much waste heat is generated, and hot is it allowed to run - its much easier to cool something that is allowed to be much hotter than its environment.
Not this time perhaps, but on larger stuff, don't overlook oil or water cooling- a 22mm pipe and central heating pump moving water can shift 30kw plus of heat none stop- the same pipe full of air and a fan, maybe a couple of hundred watts - just you don't think of it that way normally.

-------------------------
regards Mike
 08 November 2015 09:51 PM
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stateit

Posts: 2683
Joined: 15 April 2005



Had an interesting search result for " "Increased Safety" Breather Drains (DP-E Series)" in Google 'Shopping' section for these:

3 results. The was first the breather plug you linked to, FM. The other two were for "Orgone Generators"

The breather plugs look the better option!

-------------------------
S George
http://www.sg-electrical.com
 09 November 2015 10:45 AM
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craigmckee

Posts: 80
Joined: 16 September 2009

A few points on this.
I would expect that this assembly would fall under BSEN 61439-2, that being the case you do have to consider much more than just IP rating, there are fairly low limits on the temperature rise of the enclosure due to internal heating. Short circuit rating, earth capabilities etc etc

On the bright side if you do find suitably rated IP vents and fit them in line with the manufactures instructions, you can still claim the IP rating of the original enclosure, but I would expect them to have very limited results if they are IP65.

-------------------------
Regards
Craig

http://www.3phasedesign.com
 09 November 2015 12:11 PM
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leckie

Posts: 4452
Joined: 21 November 2008

The breather drain in the link doesn't say it will ventilate or cool the enclosure, it just says it will let out moisture whilst maintaining the IP rating. Interesting device though.
 09 November 2015 12:55 PM
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AJJewsbury

Posts: 16113
Joined: 13 August 2003

If you don't really need IP65 - maybe a few of these (mounted high & low) might help? http://uk.rs-online.com/web/p/...e-accessories/0104032
- Andy.
 09 November 2015 12:58 PM
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gkenyon

Posts: 4982
Joined: 06 May 2002

Breather vents can be used to provide ventilation against hydrogen evlution from batteries ("gassing").

I've seen forced air ventilation with HEPA filters for the ventilated IP 6x requirement. Consider maintenance costs though, particularly if outdoors. The IP x5 is more tricky, often involving what we used to call in the rail industry "snail vents" (baffled vents with drain holes so you can meet the "low pressure jets from all directions" requirement).

Whatever the solution (and whether you decide to ventilate or not, as moisture can be trapped in a sealed enclosure), need to perhaps consider condensation inside, particularly when the PSU is not in use ... a thermostat and anti-condensation heater would be a recommendation.

-------------------------
EUR ING Graham Kenyon CEng MIET TechIOSH
G Kenyon Technology Ltd

Web-Site: www.gkenyontech.com
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