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Topic Title: 13 Amp Plug-In Socket Covers
Topic Summary: What Defect Priority
Created On: 01 May 2014 10:00 PM
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 01 May 2014 10:00 PM
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keithredpath

Posts: 425
Joined: 30 March 2002

I am recommending the removal of all 13 amp Plug-In covers in a Nursery School. I suggest they are not fit for purpose and are surplus to requirements. They do not comply with any safety standard and have the potential to damage the socket outlets they are plugged into.

What Priority of Defect do you suggest?

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keithredpath
 01 May 2014 11:12 PM
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geov

Posts: 199
Joined: 22 February 2004

No code, but note recommendation on the EICR?
Regards
 01 May 2014 11:21 PM
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stateit

Posts: 2217
Joined: 15 April 2005

I understand your concern, but I am lost as to how explain they have the potential to damage socket outlets unless you get a caliper out and measure them.

My way of pointing out their pitfalls is in directing the concerned parties to look at the FatallyFlawed website, without trying to bring in any Regulatory stick-shaking. 'Cos there ain't any regulation against them.

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S George
http://www.sg-electrical.com
 02 May 2014 12:36 AM
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gkenyon

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Resources here: http://www.fatallyflawed.org.uk/

And here: http://www.rospa.com/homesafety/policy/electricity.aspx

(Specifically, the latter link is to the RoSPA web-site, and they clearly state that they consider there to be no need to recommend socket covers.)

However, stuff plugged into socket outlets is not necessarily part of the electrical installation.

I'd make this a note that the responsible person revisits the risk assessment, taking into account the above resources.

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Eur Ing Graham Kenyon CEng MIET TechIOSH
 02 May 2014 04:51 AM
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broadgage

Posts: 1344
Joined: 07 August 2007

Not a defect IMHO.
I would consider them to be a plug in appliance, a rather silly and needless appliance it is true, but still an appliance and not a concern when inspecting and testing the installation.

Worth noting as an observation as above.
 02 May 2014 08:06 AM
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phantom9

Posts: 690
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All the above.

Safety concerns involving children will always evoke passions far and above logic. You will never win this one. Even though removing all of the inserts would not be detrimental to the safety of the children, you try arguing with their mothers!
 02 May 2014 09:28 AM
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perspicacious

Posts: 7251
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"I am recommending the removal of all 13 amp Plug-In covers in a Nursery School."

I would appear that the nursery hasn't kept up to date with Ofsted policy.

From the below link:
FatallyFlawed claims to have won a small victory, however, by persuading education regulator Ofsted to reverse its policy of requiring nurseries and childminders to use socket covers. It is disappointed that rather than warning carers about the risks associated with covers, Ofsted refers them to the Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents (RoSPA), which declined to take any action beyond stating that covers are unnecessary.

If this is still current, I'd attach this to the EICR.

Regards

BOD

http://eandt.theiet.org/magazi...5/analysis-sockets.cfm
 02 May 2014 04:33 PM
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weirdbeard

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Originally posted by: keithredpath

I am recommending the removal of all 13 amp Plug-In covers in a Nursery School. I suggest they are not fit for purpose and are surplus to requirements.


FFS.....I would rather recommend the removal/repositioning of the sockets.......
 02 May 2014 04:58 PM
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daveparry1

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I say they're unnecessary but I don't really see what danger they cause!
 02 May 2014 05:43 PM
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mikejumper

Posts: 1797
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Originally posted by: daveparry1
I say they're unnecessary but I don't really see what danger they cause!

Weren't there some about that didn't fully cover the live openings when fully inserted?
 02 May 2014 06:05 PM
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weirdbeard

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Originally posted by: mikejumper

Weren't there some about that didn't fully cover the live openings when fully inserted?


In the case of a nursery there should be someone on hand that (a) ensures that theres nothing insertable into sockets and (b) that there's nothing inserted into sockets......if the children are left alone with items that can be inserted into sockets and are able to insert said items into sockets unattended then I would give a Code 1 - the nursery itself is dangerous and should be shut down
 02 May 2014 11:24 PM
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sparkingchip

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Is there justisifcation for propsing the installation of 10mA RCD supplementary protection in areas accessible to the children?

Andy
 02 May 2014 11:33 PM
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KFH

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I have had to remove a couple of broken plastic earth pins from sockets where those covers had been used. They were of course holding the shutters open.
 02 May 2014 11:46 PM
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spinlondon

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To my mind, it should be a code C2 (potentially dangerous).
However as far as I'm aware, it does not contravene any Regulation.
Can the codes only be used for contraventions of the Regulations?
 03 May 2014 10:36 PM
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phantom9

Posts: 690
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Originally posted by: spinlondon

To my mind, it should be a code C2 (potentially dangerous).

However as far as I'm aware, it does not contravene any Regulation.

Can the codes only be used for contraventions of the Regulations?


How can you code something that is NOT PART of the electrical installation? These socket inserts are nothing but a scam preying on the emotions of over protective mothers trying to misguidedly make something that is already safe even safer. They are not made to any BS nor are they part of any recognised code for manufacture. They are not a device referred to in the Regs either. Just one of these bizarre objects that appear from time to time and the emotions run riot. C2, really? They should be banned.
 03 May 2014 10:45 PM
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daveparry1

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I agree with you on this one Phantom, as they aren't part of the installation I don't see how they can be given a code. I think they're unnecessary but on the other hand I can't see how they are dangerous either.
 04 May 2014 08:16 AM
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dp11

Posts: 55
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Not saying this is right or wrong, we all appear to argee the is no standard for these. So there is a small possibility that the actual socket has been damaged e.g. live pin contacts now don't provide the correct contact pressure. I can see a nice scam here in having to replace the sockets.
 04 May 2014 05:04 PM
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phantom9

Posts: 690
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The bottom line is, the insertion of the socket cover opens the gates on the live and neutral tunnels, whereas, if the socket was left alone with no plug in it, the gates are closed over the live and neutral tunnels. If it is a switched socket, the live tunnel is isolated anyway with the switch off, and double pole sockets both L and N are isolated. When the non-approved socket cover is inserted it is in direct contact with the live and neutral but is the PVC compound used to make these stupid covers tested to any voltage? Nope. Would you use a screwdriver made with the same plastic on a live terminal? I wouldn't.
 05 May 2014 11:33 AM
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perspicacious

Posts: 7251
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"When the non-approved socket cover is inserted it is in direct contact with the live and neutral"

Isn't the length of these pins too short to actually make contact?

Regards

BOD
 06 May 2014 09:02 AM
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joepostle

Posts: 72
Joined: 14 September 2011

Originally posted by: weirdbeard

FFS.....I would rather recommend the removal/repositioning of the sockets.......


Personally I would second this, to a height that adults would find high. In addition (and possibly overkill) I would maybe suggest they are separately isolatable and powered-up only during use?!
IET » Wiring and the regulations » 13 Amp Plug-In Socket Covers

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