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Topic Title: Emergency Lighting Design & Relux
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Created On: 17 January 2014 11:46 PM
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 17 January 2014 11:46 PM
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chriso

Posts: 78
Joined: 06 February 2007

Question for anybody who has been involved with emergency lighting design and Relux:

I've been going through a large commercial unit conducting a PIR, I've now been asked to commence remedials. As well as this I've been asked to evaluate the current emergency lighting system, it's not up to much. Various key points not lit, broken fittings and no lighting along escape routes.

I've never done emergency lighting design before, I have the Electricians Guide to Emergency Lighting and have been reading up with online guides also. Where I'm struggling is I don't seem to be able to track down spacing guides on typical bulkhead fittings. Also I have some larger open areas with escape routes passing through them, floor to lighting trunking height is about 5 metres and I'm going to need to install emergency fluorescent fittings (from the trunking over these areas). This evening, I have been reading through the Relux manual (I was hoping Relux might be the answer in terms of spacing and light levels from height), I'm wondering how long it's going to take me to get to grips with it and whether it will do what I need it to.

Any ideas, before I give up the will to live! first day off tomorrow since the start of the month, really looking forward to spending it looking at emergency lighting!
 18 January 2014 12:19 AM
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peteTLM

Posts: 3186
Joined: 31 March 2005

Bulkhead fittings have their uses but are not going to be up to much with the height and description. What lighting is in place at the moment? Has a fra been done by others at any time?

I'd be looking at em fluorescents (ie 5fts) as a minimum .
Is there any machinery in the unit or other hazards?

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Lack of planning on your part doesn't make it an emergency on mine....

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 18 January 2014 12:47 AM
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chriso

Posts: 78
Joined: 06 February 2007

They've had an FRA, the only thing that picked up was a lack of lighting in toilets (although not greater than 8sqM, but accessed by the public) and an external fire escape only having a light at the top of the stairs.

I'm thinking bulkhead fittings in the standard ceiling height areas and fluorescents in the high level areas (hoping to replace existing with emergency versions).

The unit is used as a garage, it has skylights; so decent levels of natural light in the open areas where the work is carried out. Opening hours are 0800-1700. The only time anybody would be in the building outside these hours is when staff are responding to a callout (24hr service) and coming in for materials.
 18 January 2014 06:59 AM
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mossep

Posts: 347
Joined: 05 December 2010

Don't forget in the winter daylight hours tend to ignore opening hours!

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 20 January 2014 09:48 PM
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HarryJMacdonald

Posts: 254
Joined: 15 May 2002

The BS on Em lighting is very good (I've forgotten the number) but it also corresponds very closely to how comfortable you feel walking round when only the em lighting is on. Basically if you have a clear flat surface - a designated escape route, then you don't need to see your feet at all, you just need to see where you are going, so a very low level is acceptable.

If obstructions are likely to be present then the lighting needs to be 10x that level - but still very low.

Be careful of emergency fluorescent fittings, some give out very much less light when operating on battery and also watch for the requirement that the emergency lighting must come on when only the local circuit fails.

I would mend all the broken fittings then walk round with only the em lighting on. Anywhere you feel uncomfortable add a light. The exception to this is outside as you can't turn all the streetlighting off - but a power cut could.
 20 January 2014 10:08 PM
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Zs

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Joined: 20 July 2006

Hello Chriso,

I see that a few days have passed since you posted yours.

On the subject of Relux...yes, it does take a while to get to grips with it. It is much more than a Sunday afternoon thing. If you have chosen to go the relux route since you posted there is something you need to know;

For most lighting you will calculate using the 'average indirect' calculation but for emergency lighting you must use the 'direct'. As you will see, that makes a big difference.

You also need to be sure, for emergency lighting, that you are using the correct fittings and the photometric information that you use is correct. Quite often with normal light fittings, if they don't appear on the Relux list you can fudge something similar from the list to behave exactly. But that is not something I would do for emergency lighting because it can be a life or death issue and you must provide information with your reports.

Where are you up to with this now? I'll tell you more but you may already have dealt with it.

and just to add something that might be of use to you; In a large open area with high ceilings, such as yours, it is often the case that self contained emergency fittings of any description are not going to cut the mustard. Very often, a central battery pack will be the only thing that has enough welly to keep the lighting level as high as you need it. Your call is whether you are providing light for exiting the building ( which in fact is very low and quite easy to achieve) or whether you are providing sufficient light for someone to make safe a work space, finish mixing chemicals or whatever, and then leave the building.

Zs

Edited: 20 January 2014 at 10:18 PM by Zs
 20 January 2014 10:28 PM
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leckie

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Joined: 21 November 2008

You could always get some input from manufacturers, Cooper, Thorn, etc.

They will give design info FOC usually providing you then use there kit.
 20 January 2014 10:51 PM
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chriso

Posts: 78
Joined: 06 February 2007

Thanks for your comments.

I had a rethink on how best to achieve my aims. Like you said Zs, Relux was going to take longer than I had! I have downloaded a copy of Draftsight (CAD) and drew up an accurate floorplan, I have drawn the existing fittings on this plan. I have also managed to find some spacing tables that should allow me to work out how many and at what spacings I need to install additional fittings.

I'm looking to allow for escape lighting, there are reasonable levels of light during opening hours. I think the priority is for providing adequate lighting for use in the night when a fitter may be in the building. The company are just having the emergency escape route painted on the floor, this route is to be kept clear at all times (honest!)

I don't want to go over the top with what they require, but equally the onus is on me to get it right.
 20 January 2014 10:57 PM
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leckie

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If you talk to say, coopers, they will give you all the info you need for this job. Channel are also very good. Then you can learn about Relux at your leisure.
 21 January 2014 08:08 AM
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welchyboy

Posts: 49
Joined: 08 September 2011

I personally got on with dialux better with emegency lighting design, there are some good tutorials on youtube if you get stuck, it does take time to learn

If your doing periodics on emergency lighting and have trouble finding spacing data for fittings the icel spacing tables give you data for most types of conversion and bulkhead fittings you can use, you can find this on google search and print it off

At any height over about 2.5 m. Your usual 8watt bulkhead will be ineffective, at a height of 5m i would be looking at twin spot 20w floodlamp type fittings maybe?
 21 January 2014 10:31 AM
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OMS

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At any height over about 2.5 m. Your usual 8watt bulkhead will be ineffective, at a height of 5m i would be looking at twin spot 20w floodlamp type fittings maybe?


Two points:

1 - a standard 8W bulkhead will provide a perfectly acceptable solution even at 5m - you just need to identify the appropriate transverse and/or axial spacing between luminaires and between luminaires and partitions. It will be an economic balance if you then decide that conversion of general luminaires is more cost effective.

As an example (and for 1 lux minimum), a typical 8w bulkhead would have an axial spacing of around 3.6m at 2.5m (h) but would only reduce to 3.3m spacing if installed at 4.0m (h) - the luminaire to wall spacing would however drop by about half.

2 - A 20W Twin spot luminaire will be highly unlikley to meet the 40:1 luminance ratio specified in BS 5266 - 1:2011 - I see them offerd as solutions quite often, but the calculations rarely comply when you make an issue of it with the "designer"

Regards

OMS

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