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Topic Title: grid switches
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Created On: 31 October 2013 08:15 PM
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 31 October 2013 08:15 PM
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goldenboy1818

Posts: 475
Joined: 22 February 2011

Hi gonna have a kitchen where the is a mass of built in appliances. Normally use fused spurs sometimes in cupboards but thinking of using a grid switch this time for neatness. I assume these are very simple ? and is each individual switch a 20amp switch rather than a fused spur switch ? Can these be surface mounted ?? Thank you
 31 October 2013 09:05 PM
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Ampman

Posts: 1009
Joined: 06 February 2006

Right pain ,

Ive removed more of these now they used to be the rage 10 years ago on new houses very tight in back box , ive repaired some also ive used surface patresses to releive the pressure on the switch .

I wouldnt if i was you
 31 October 2013 10:01 PM
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aligarjon

Posts: 2818
Joined: 09 September 2005

Also I think you need to watch the rating of the 20amp switches if you are going to connect multiple appliances to the ring circuit.

Gary

-------------------------
Specialised Subject. The Bleedin Obvious. John Cleese
 31 October 2013 10:12 PM
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sparkiemike

Posts: 1537
Joined: 24 January 2008

I avoid grid where I can. It can get very untidy inside if you are not careful and be difficult to work on for maintenance. I also think they look pretty ugly.

How are you connect the appliances, they usually come with a 13A fused plug, so that should be accessible. Why bother with a SFCU just have a single socket outlet in an adjacent cupboard?

How are you going to supply the Grid, you will need fused modules if you reduce the size of the cables for the part of the circuit that supplies the load.


Yes you can get surface boxes, MK do a range of metal clad surface boxes eg k8895alm. Download the MK Electric Specification Guide for more info.
 31 October 2013 11:07 PM
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HarryJMacdonald

Posts: 254
Joined: 15 May 2002

I had a right pain of a job recently. A neighbour had a tripping RCD so I had to go round the circuit looking for a NE fault and I cursed the electrician who had wired in all the appliances when it would have been just as easy to install a socket.
 01 November 2013 07:56 PM
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largelunchbox

Posts: 365
Joined: 06 July 2008

Originally posted by: HarryJMacdonald

I had a right pain of a job recently. A neighbour had a tripping RCD so I had to go round the circuit looking for a NE fault and I cursed the electrician who had wired in all the appliances when it would have been just as easy to install a socket.


dont understand that, if there hard wired to a switched fused spur you just turn off the the switch which is double pole and thats the same as unplugging a socket
 01 November 2013 08:01 PM
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largelunchbox

Posts: 365
Joined: 06 July 2008

Originally posted by: goldenboy1818

Hi gonna have a kitchen where the is a mass of built in appliances. Normally use fused spurs sometimes in cupboards but thinking of using a grid switch this time for neatness. I assume these are very simple ? and is each individual switch a 20amp switch rather than a fused spur switch ? Can these be surface mounted ?? Thank you


wouldnt go the grid route,why not try my method of 100mm x 50mm trunking in the back of a cupboard (i usually use the one above a high level oven) and use the back boxes which clip into the trunking,u can get 5 or 6 one gang switches next to each other and if you use singles between your t&e tails its nice and flexi to push the sfu back.
 01 November 2013 08:52 PM
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aligarjon

Posts: 2818
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my preferred method is adjacent cupboards also. Even if you have 3 or 4 appliances in a block the middle plugtops will reach past one other appliance into a cupboard. If it hasn't got drawers of course.

Gary

-------------------------
Specialised Subject. The Bleedin Obvious. John Cleese
 01 November 2013 11:26 PM
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HarryJMacdonald

Posts: 254
Joined: 15 May 2002

Either these ones were SP switched or I was being dim!
Either way I failed to find the fault (it was in another room which the "kitchen" ring main also supplied!) and I had a right faff plugging their fridge/freezer into an extension lead as the installer had thrown the plug away.
 01 November 2013 11:27 PM
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HarryJMacdonald

Posts: 254
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Agree with aligarjon - but please label the plugs!
 02 November 2013 08:10 AM
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dickllewellyn

Posts: 1150
Joined: 19 March 2010

I did a 3 gang bank of double pole switches the other day feeding individual socket outlets on each switch. I've generally avoided the grid route in kitchens in favour of sockets in adjacent cupboards. This client particularly wanted switches above but was worried about having 3 sfcu's cluttering things up and asked if we could do a grid. I must say my heart sank. I fitted an extra deep box, but still had problems with squeezing everything in, and also had problems with the terminals on the MK switches. The decline of MK quality is another issue though!

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Richard (Dick)

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