IET logo
 
IET
Decrease font size
Increase font size
Topic Title: Greenwood fan
Topic Summary:
Created On: 29 October 2013 05:32 PM
Status: Post and Reply
Linear : Threading : Single : Branch
Search Topic Search Topic
Topic Tools Topic Tools
View similar topics View similar topics
View topic in raw text format. Print this topic.
 29 October 2013 05:32 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



daveparry1

Posts: 6113
Joined: 04 July 2007

Hi all,
I have a Greenwood toilet fan to replace, I want to stick with the same make as they don't specify 3 amp fuse protection. I'm a bit puzzled by the existing one though as it has a pull-cord and it's also got over-run timer! (wired with the usual perm. live & sw. live).
Just had a thought as I was typing this, would the pull-cord be just to operate the shutter? It works a micro-switch on the pcb,

Dave.
 29 October 2013 08:12 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message


Avatar for dickllewellyn.
dickllewellyn

Posts: 1150
Joined: 19 March 2010

Has it got a humidistat as well? We tend to cut the pull cord off and just have it operating on the light or the humidistat. The pull cord is a boost on some greenwood fans whereby the humidistat brings the fan on at low speed, and if the pull cord is used it comes on at full speed.

-------------------------
Regards
Richard (Dick)

"Insert words of wisdom and/or witty pun here"
 29 October 2013 08:23 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



daveparry1

Posts: 6113
Joined: 04 July 2007

Thanks Dick, I suppose it could be a boost control, I don't think it's got humidistat as it's in the gents at our local village hall. The reason i'm a bit concerned is because the light is on for a long time in there, unlike a domestic bathroom so I doubt they'd want the fan running for hours on end and I don't want to fit something they will moan about and want changed again!
 29 October 2013 09:17 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message


Avatar for leckie.
leckie

Posts: 1715
Joined: 21 November 2008

Hi Dave.

This fan will be the humidistat type AXS100HT. The fan has a run on timer and a pull cord. If you want you can wire a supply to the SL terminal on the fan, pull the pull cord and it just switches the fan on and when pulled again it turns of and runs on until the timer cuts out or the humidity level drops. If you pull the cord to the on position you can just wire a switch wire from the light and it will also run on via the timer. So you can do as Dick says.; wire the SL connection from the light switch, pull the cord to the on position and then cut it off. So basically wire it as a standard timer fan, but pull the cord to the on position
 29 October 2013 09:23 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



daveparry1

Posts: 6113
Joined: 04 July 2007

Thanks Leckie, it all makes sense now, I've never come across a fan with a pull switch and a run-on timer before! I'll just wire it back up as it is now then, live, sw.live & neutral,

Dave.
 29 October 2013 09:50 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



daveparry1

Posts: 6113
Joined: 04 July 2007

Just been giving this some more thought! As it's in the gents toilet is there any point in me fitting a humidity controlled fan? I wouldn't think there's ever going to be enough humidity in there for it to come on, maybe there's nothing wrong with the one that's in there, perhaps there's never been enough humidity there to trigger it!
 30 October 2013 07:53 AM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message


Avatar for dickllewellyn.
dickllewellyn

Posts: 1150
Joined: 19 March 2010

You should be able to adjust the sensitivity of the humidistat. Most have a little pot to turn down until the fan stops as a baseline humidity level, perhaps it's turned down too low? In a gents toilet however, I would assume the concern is more for smells than for humidity. Perhaps a fan with an occupancy sensor and overrun timer would be the best solution? You may find as well that a 4" fan won't provide the required number of air changes for the size of room. Public toilets have a much higher requirement than a domestic cloakroom.

-------------------------
Regards
Richard (Dick)

"Insert words of wisdom and/or witty pun here"
Statistics

See Also:



FuseTalk Standard Edition v3.2 - © 1999-2014 FuseTalk Inc. All rights reserved.