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Topic Title: Arcing faults
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Created On: 07 September 2013 06:23 PM
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 07 September 2013 06:23 PM
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lyledunn

Posts: 617
Joined: 13 August 2003

Working in Oklahoma USA at the moment. Private residential job where I am simply helping a member of my family. Interestingly their code requires the deployment of arc fault current interrupters (AFCI). These are being fitted in the panel board as combination units, ie normal over current protection, ground fault protection and both series and parallel arcing current protection. There seems to be a large body of opinion in the USA that backs their use for protection against fire in domestic situations.
Just passing on a wee bit of info.

-------------------------
Regards,

Lyle Dunn
 07 September 2013 10:03 PM
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AdrianWint

Posts: 262
Joined: 25 May 2006

Yes, I've been reading about these. Apparently they are only compulsory on circuits in bedrooms but seem to be even more of a pain in the backside for nuisance tripping than RCDs.....

I did wonder how sensitive they are ... what about something which deliberately makes an arc .... like the brushes on the motor in a hair drier?

Adrian
 09 September 2013 09:29 AM
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bartonp

Posts: 49
Joined: 28 September 2009

... and this from the land of the free (and wirenuts).
Maybe it's because of the wirenuts?
 09 September 2013 09:54 AM
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AJJewsbury

Posts: 11385
Joined: 13 August 2003

Maybe it's because their lower voltage means that their appliances need to draw twice the current for the same effect - so (courtesy of I2R) four times the heating of a poor joint - so much more likely to break down. They also don't routinely loop test so any high resistance joints don't get spotted early.
- Andy.
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