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Topic Title: What drill driver
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Created On: 28 August 2013 08:48 PM
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 28 August 2013 08:48 PM
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Grumpy

Posts: 755
Joined: 09 January 2009

I'm in the market for a replacement for my trusty dewalt 14.4v combi drill. I quite like the fact that I can drill the odd hole with it but I suppose screw driving is its primary function. The battery world has moved on so I can consider any make. What's everyone using these days, I know nothing about impact drivers for example.

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 28 August 2013 08:58 PM
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circle143

Posts: 244
Joined: 19 July 2007

I am using an 18volt Milwaukee - its fantastic for screw driving, hole saws and even auger bits up to 25mm.
 28 August 2013 09:09 PM
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sparkiemike

Posts: 1631
Joined: 24 January 2008

For everyday driving I would not be without my Bosch GSR 10,8-LI Professional Cordless screwdriver. It is NOT an impact driver it is very smooth and can be used in a multitude of ways, but still very powerful.

It has a Hex 1/4" universal bit holder, so I have some hex drill bits when I need to drill the occasional hole in wood or plasterboard. Any other drilling I get the big one out http://www.bosch-professional....r-36-v-li-11351-ocs-p/ or the SDS.
 28 August 2013 09:13 PM
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redtoblackblewtopieces

Posts: 208
Joined: 10 January 2013

12volt milwaukee with 1/4" hex for screw driving , 28volt milwaukee for everything else cordless
Kevin

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 28 August 2013 09:28 PM
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stateit

Posts: 2682
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Over the past while I've been replacing my Makita kit with DeWalt.

Screwfix had an offer on DeWalt Li-on 14.4 v combi-drill with 10.8v impact a bit over a year ago. I didn't know how far 14.4v kit had moved on over a few years.

My wholesaler had an offer on a 3Ah 18v DeWalt combi a little while later.

I soon sought out an offer on an 18v DeWalt angle drill soon after from LawsonHIS, and followed it up with spare batteries so I've got 2 batteries of each flavour.

The kit hasn't cost the earth, as I've other things to spend my cash on, but they do the job well.

One thing that swings DeWalt for me are the vibration statistics... Power tools have knackered my arms/hands, and DeWalt score well on this point for lower vibration measurements.

Bosch are great tools and the dearer ones last forever, but from my research the vibration measures for them are among the highest.

[As an aside:

For vibration measurements the average daily use limit for a mains 2KG SDS drill on chisel function is only 9 minutes. Think before you use these tools...]

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S George
http://www.sg-electrical.com
 28 August 2013 09:34 PM
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alanblaby

Posts: 757
Joined: 09 March 2012

Everyday driving, a Festool CXS12, also does drill in wood/thin metal/breeze blocks and soft bricks.

Heavier duty, a Festool C12 with 12V batteries (NOT 10.8v), that will drill most materials apart from the hardest masonry.
For heavy masonry/long holes, any SDS drill. Mine gets used maybe once a week, but it is essential when it is needed. I've got a £100 Bosch, but any will do, as it get used so few times.
 28 August 2013 09:36 PM
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chunk522

Posts: 127
Joined: 12 December 2010

Panosonic unbeatable in my opinion great after service as well 3 years warranty on batteries and parts,
Ive always had dewalt but they are not a patch on panosonic.
 28 August 2013 10:20 PM
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leckie

Posts: 4439
Joined: 21 November 2008

Well I think you need a tool for each of the two functions. Electricians fit mainly 1 - 2 inch no 8 screws. Plus a few others. You don't want a big bit of kit for that. I agree with Mike, the 10.8v Bosch is fantastic. I have one and also the impact driver version. For a drill? I have a 36v Bosch drill, mainly for holesaws and twist drills. A hilti for big SDS stuff. Two 110v metabo specialist joist drills (short with very high torque), one with an angle chuck the other standard.

Plus some other stuff for diamond drilling, etc. and loads of older drills that I can't bear to bin!


I agree that Panasonic drill/drivers are excellent, and if I had to have a combined bit of kit, I would probably go for that.

Edited: 29 August 2013 at 07:45 AM by leckie
 29 August 2013 07:51 AM
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SherlockOhms

Posts: 348
Joined: 05 April 2011

DeWalt/B+D 18v Lithium 3Ah on all of my kit including torch. So far so good.

I could do with a small driver, I hate those over long fixing screws on accessories. I've got my eye on a nice little pistol Makita.

I do love a power tool

S.
 29 August 2013 08:21 AM
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dickllewellyn

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The new Stanley Fatmax kit is worth a look, I had their 18v combi drill on trial for a little while and was very impressed, although they do only have 1.5ah batteries. I currently have a fatmax 10.8v drill driver and 10.8v impact driver which are both brilliant, cheaper than their dewalt counter parts, and still have a 3 year guarantee.

My current 18v kit is Metabo. I have their combi drill, an SDS drill, and a circular saw running on 4ah batteries (they now also do a 5ah) I'm considering adding an angle grinder and a work light to the kit.

Dewalts new 18v 4ah brushless combi is supposed to be the bees knees, I've not tried it myself, but heard good things.

Bosch products are pretty good, but their after service is a bit hit and miss, I've heard a lot of horror stories regarding their 10.8v batteries.

Makita tools are awesome, but the batteries not so. There is no circuitry to stop deep discharge of the batteries in use, so trying to squeeze that one last screw or hole really can lead to battery failure. They are available for around £60 now.

I always rated Panasonic, but don't really have any experience of their current kit.

Milwauke was I believe brought about by one of the Dewalt guys before Stanley bought the brand. They do get a good write up, and I've used some of their kit and been impressed, but can't comment on longevity.

I'll just get my anorak!

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Richard (Dick)

"Insert words of wisdom and/or witty pun here"
 29 August 2013 10:11 PM
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leckie

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Is this you in your anorak Dick?
https://marketplace.asos.com/listing/jackets/vintage-80s-berghaus-retro-anorak-festival-jacket/1091498

Edited: 30 August 2013 at 04:17 AM by leckie
 30 August 2013 02:40 AM
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SKElectrical

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just make sure that it can fit big bits in it, ie it has big jaws. For example I have a cone cutter which gets used a hell of a lot. Not a lot of drills can actually take this cone cutter - what a waste of time!
 30 August 2013 07:56 AM
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dickllewellyn

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That's a fine example you found there Leckie! I must say though I have a slightly fuller physique than that lad, and slightly less bowed legs!

I can definitely echo the comments of SKElectrical, make sure it can take cone cutters and hole cutters etc. Try to find one with a good locking chuck as well, or you may regret using hole cutters to cut downlights in one day when the chuck has loosened and the cutter falls out chipping that expensive shower tray you were trying not to leave footprints on!

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Richard (Dick)

"Insert words of wisdom and/or witty pun here"
 30 August 2013 12:12 PM
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prophet

Posts: 338
Joined: 09 October 2011

Always bought Bosch (thats 15 years of brand loyalty!) until i had the misfortune of buying a 14.4v drill driver and impact driver set. The chuck is terrible as it comes loose, meaning the bits fall out.

Will probably go panasonic next as i've heard good things.
 30 August 2013 01:06 PM
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iie63674

Posts: 108
Joined: 17 May 2006

I've used a Makita 7.2 V NiMH (no hammer action) for about 10 years, but last week I was in Axminster Power Tools and bought an 18V Makita with a 3 AH battery and 20 minute charger. I've used it quite a bit since to drill holes in masonry as well as inserting screws in softwood, and I'm well impressed. £150-ish, in a metal case. Only one battery, but I can't think of any likely job that can't wait 20 minutes!
 30 August 2013 06:44 PM
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peteTLM

Posts: 3715
Joined: 31 March 2005

ive got a panasonic 14.4v 3.3Ah sds cordless- fantastic! replaced my 36v bosch with it as it weighs half as much.

Normal drill wise- i have to drill holes in metal/ wood/ plasterboard all day long up to 110mm, so only the heavier cordless drills will have the momentum and power. currently have de walt DCD985M2 4AH. £300 but worth every penny.

A builder i do bit for has a load of cheap bosch lithium cordless's- these literally stop dead with a hole saw in them!

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 30 August 2013 07:25 PM
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antric2

Posts: 1267
Joined: 20 October 2006

I had a go of my mates HILTI 22v drill today.
I thought my Dewalt XRP's were great til I tried this.
What a quality tool that is.
He doesnt own it he hires it.He pays £11 + vat a month over 3years .and if anything goes wrong they pick it up,leave him a temp replacement,take his away to repair or replace it with new.At end of the term he gives it back and like this time he has just renewed the deal and got a brand new drill again.
Regards
Antric
 30 August 2013 07:44 PM
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weirdbeard

Posts: 3116
Joined: 26 September 2011

Originally posted by: Grumpy
What's everyone using these days, I know nothing about impact drivers for example.


They take a bit of getting used to for smaller driving jobs, but I wouldn't be without my impact driver, they come into their own for driving larger fixings.

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 30 August 2013 07:48 PM
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slittle

Posts: 3678
Joined: 22 November 2007

All of my guys have Makita 18v although I've got Ryobi mainly because when I brought them six'ish years ago they were cheaper than the Makita.

I've dropped it, beaten it, soaked it and it still works, so pound for pound probably not bad.

When and if I need to replace them , I'll go back to Makita I suspect

Stu
 01 September 2013 10:09 AM
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unshockable

Posts: 952
Joined: 18 May 2007

Originally posted by: weirdbeard

Originally posted by: Grumpy

What's everyone using these days, I know nothing about impact drivers for example.




They take a bit of getting used to for smaller driving jobs, but I wouldn't be without my impact driver, they come into their own for driving larger fixings.


As well as driving large screws or removing old ones without stripping the head, you have a shorter body and plenty of torque to drill joists perpendicular to the plane, if you don't want to get the angle drill out. Never get stuck on a knotty patch half way.

Once used, you could never go back. They seem to work on the same basis as when we faced a little resistance with a normal screwdriver we leaned on it and twisted a little; the battery one does it 50 times a second.

For the record I prioritise variety and power and have the old 18v Dewalt XRP li ion with drill/driver, impact, torch, vac, sds, jigsaw, recip saw. The charger is 40 mins. Lithium batteries are regulated to prevent emptying them and therefore damaging them. They go from full power to off.

If I was starting fresh I would get the new 4A li ion kit which looks more compact.

Good luck
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