IET logo
 
IET
Decrease font size
Increase font size
Topic Title: EMERGENCY LIGHTING
Topic Summary:
Created On: 26 August 2013 05:47 PM
Status: Post and Reply
Linear : Threading : Single : Branch
Search Topic Search Topic
Topic Tools Topic Tools
View similar topics View similar topics
View topic in raw text format. Print this topic.
 26 August 2013 05:47 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



kooltech

Posts: 1
Joined: 26 August 2013

Around 2 years ago, we installed a new EL instalation at one of our sites. Fittings are self contained and manufactured by a member of the ICEL. Earlier this year the fittings started to fail, due to a faultly relay on the PCB board. We now have approx 1/3 of the installation faulty.

Despite repeated phone calls and emails - the manufacturer has barely responded and for over 3 months now, all we get is - 'we're still looking in to it'

Apart from naming and shaming the company, what other recourse do I have? It has reached the stage now where, I need to replace the fittings as it is becoming a H&S issue.

I woulld have expected a life of around 8 years from a fitting and a battery life of at least 3 years.

Any advice on how to proceed ?
 26 August 2013 06:29 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



Zs

Posts: 3010
Joined: 20 July 2006

I think that's shocking kooltech.

Did the product have a specific guarantee period?

Have a look at this, it is a link to one of the consumer rights organisations and has some example letters etc.:

http://www.which.co.uk/consume...on/sale-of-goods-act/

But most of all, I would not expect a product which is being manufactured and sold for health and safety reasons to fail within two years. Would you mind please telling us what they are so that we don't use them?

Trading Standards also come to mind.

Zs
 02 September 2013 04:44 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



Delbot321

Posts: 77
Joined: 06 November 2012

I could be wrong here but when I did my contract law course the Sale Of Goods Act applies to private consumers not in a business to business environment - although they should still meet the requirement of 'fit for purpose'.

Also just because a company is a member of ICEL it doesn't necessarily follow that the fittings you purchased have met the ICEL approval requirements. For example the conversion kits that allow you to make a florescent light into an emergency unit will never achieve and ICEL accreditation unless they are fitted and tested in a suitable lab or similar facility, that doesn't mean that an ICEL accredited supplier doesn't sell them, or they don't work - they just won't have that accreditation.

The ICEL accreditation does require that the circuit boards have a design life of 8 years, if one failed that could be down to may influencing factors but when you have 1/3 of them failing this would demonstrate either a design or production problem.

I would suggest:
1. Check to see if the fittings you have do have an ICEL accreditation as opposed to being some cheap lights that a company who is registered with ICEL have sold you. If you have bought cheap fittings thinking they had ICEL approval but were actually only from an ICEL supplier you may be stuck with them.
2. If they have a genuine certificate for those fittings (and not just that they are an ICEL member) then they need to provide suitable response and reasoning why they have failed despite having such a stringent manufacturing design. In my experience ICEL accredited fittings are more expensive hence the accreditation and product quality is what you should be paying for (although they often look the same as cheaper alternatives). This may then give you a better legal position as to a suitable resolution.
3. If they don't have a genuine certificate for the fittings you have check to see if they were listed as having that certificate when you bought them. Similarly they may have the ICEL logo on the fitting itself. Either way this could be misrepresentation of what they were selling.

When you have this information you will be in a better position to decide on a course of action. In my experience a well written letter from your solicitor has a much more positive effect in resolving things than anything from yourself.

As a threat your solicitor could well suggest that in the absence of responses by them you will be forced to replace the faulty lights in order to protect you staff/premises and they risk this cost being passed to them should any future proceedings go against them.

Hope this helps
 02 September 2013 05:04 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message


Avatar for rocknroll.
rocknroll

Posts: 8891
Joined: 03 October 2005

I could be wrong here but when I did my contract law course the Sale Of Goods Act applies to private consumers not in a business to business environment - although they should still meet the requirement of 'fit for purpose'.


Correct, SOGA is limited when it comes to business to business transactions, businesses are expected to be aware and we start running into contract law, simply the supplier has a contract with you to supply goods fit for purpose.

regards

-------------------------
"Take nothing but a picture,
leave nothing but footprints!"
-------------------------
"Oh! The drama of it all."
-------------------------
"You can throw all the philosophy you like at the problem, but at the end of the day it's just basic electrical theory!"
-------------------------
 02 September 2013 09:12 PM
User is online View Users Profile Print this message



peteTLM

Posts: 3217
Joined: 31 March 2005

Unfortunately ive been in this boat quite a few years back. I had £2500 worth of em lights fail after 6 months. Luckily the makers changed the lot.
But the downfall of the lights was due to the expected duty cycle of the lights. I required them to be on 24/7 (maintained), but they apparently were not made for that, and were expected to have something like 12 hours on max. This caused overheating and the failure of the batterys which couldnt handle the increased temp. The lamps also lasted a month max.
Its amazing how feeble they are made down to cost.
A change of gear trays changed the situation massively.

-------------------------
----------------------------------------
Lack of planning on your part doesn't make it an emergency on mine....

Every man has to know his limitations- Dirty Harry
 02 September 2013 10:25 PM
User is offline View Users Profile Print this message



johnnmann

Posts: 53
Joined: 18 October 2006

Europe's two biggest emergency light manufacturers both used to make their products in the UK. Then the Americans bought both companies and decided to manufacture in China. I saw some of the Chinese product shortly before the UK factories were shut and was not impressed.
Statistics

See Also:



FuseTalk Standard Edition v3.2 - © 1999-2014 FuseTalk Inc. All rights reserved.