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Topic Title: Help please. Noob
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Created On: 26 July 2013 09:40 PM
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 26 July 2013 09:40 PM
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Whitmore

Posts: 14
Joined: 26 July 2013

I have recently started on a course with Olci in the hope of changing my life for the better.
I have had no previous experience with electro technical and have worked in retail for the last 15 yrs.
The work that I have encountered is completely mind boggling.... Are there any reference materials/publications out there that don't cost the earth and will help me understand better than the brief explanations in my reference materials.
I'm not stupid but I could do with a booster when there isn't a tutor to ask when u r not sure.

I have almost arranged to do 1 day per weeks free labour for a professional in exchange for hands on experience and knowledge.

Edited: 26 July 2013 at 10:06 PM by Whitmore
 26 July 2013 11:46 PM
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microy

Posts: 358
Joined: 25 October 2005

Noob.

The obvious place is your local library. If they don't have what you want you can order them for a nominal fee.

Mike.
 27 July 2013 12:49 AM
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Whitmore

Posts: 14
Joined: 26 July 2013

Thanks Mike

I've got one on order at the moment. " Basic Electrical Installation Work" by Trevor Linsley. Just wondering if there was one that anyone could recommend to someone starting out with Zero experience in this field.

Simon
 27 July 2013 08:22 AM
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eclipse

Posts: 151
Joined: 03 November 2006

Where are you based?

-------------------------
Thanks

Alan.

Now what was that reg no?
 27 July 2013 09:58 AM
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davezawadi

Posts: 2710
Joined: 26 June 2002

Well thats a starting point. What makes you want to be an electrician if you have no knowledge of the work? It seems a bit of a risk to me, and its unlikely to be the money, at least for a few years. Take care with the DIY books, lots of them are pretty poor and inaccurate. A good revision of electrical circuits, and ohms law, browse the web, plenty of stuff there. Try "basic electricity", "simple circuit theory" and similar searches.

-------------------------
David
CEng etc, don't ask, its a result not a question!
 27 July 2013 10:51 AM
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Zs

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Welcome Simon,

In fact, welcome to our minefield.

My favourite reference manual is 'electrical installation work' by Brian Scaddan. I used the first three or four chapters constantly in the early days and I like his plain English explanations. I still use it. It is important to pick up an understanding of the science as early as you can. I fell down quite badly on this and after about three years I realised that pretending to understand just because I could reel off the formulae and some regulations by rote was holding me back.

So, I took the back off it all and went right back to the beginning in private time. Have come to love the right angled triangle and magnetism. A kind of magic.

so, for starters I recommend some maths study. Pythagoras. You need the basics (square of the hypotenuse is equal to........) and an understanding of the sines cosines and tangents and how they relate to the rest of it. You will need it all but for now though, ignore the sines cosines and tangents and just get the basic formula ingrained. Learn what happens if one side changes size, what it does to the other sides, what happens if you know that you cannot change the slanty side or the right angle but the short side is changing....you'll love it and it will help enormously.

Whenever possible, I recommend that you see all of the aspects of your on-paper learning in practice right from the beginning. If you see what is causing an electrical fault, take a photo of it and get your head around the physics of it as soon as you can. It'll have something to do with that triangle. I'm not sure if it is too early for you to be dabbling with faults but I spend quite a bit of time replicating the ones I come across on a dummy circuit. What, why, why again, how, how to fix, what happens if I do this to it and more of the why? Maybe not yet though.

Otherwise, you've come to the right place.

good luck,

Zs
 27 July 2013 11:50 AM
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aligarjon

Posts: 2868
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I agree with all of the above, but to be honest, you will never beat on the job training so long as they are doing it properly. Its one thing working in a classroom envirement, its completely different on site For me that is the best place to start just to see if this industry is for you.

Gary

-------------------------
Specialised Subject. The Bleedin Obvious. John Cleese
 27 July 2013 02:30 PM
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zeeper

Posts: 1411
Joined: 11 July 2008

Get yourself the

IET "on site guide".

The IET "guidance note" books for the BS7671 are very good.

and obviously BS7671 2008 amended 2011(amendment 1)

Your also need knowledge of "The electricity at work regulations 1989"

It takes many many years to get a full grasp but dont let that put you off.

I think it was so one on here who said, " The more I learn the less I think I know".

Its a big bag of worms at times, and the depth of knowledge of good electricians is not recognised in the pay packet. So if its just money you want, train as a gas fitter instead as its better money.And the exams are all multi guess
 27 July 2013 02:31 PM
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Whitmore

Posts: 14
Joined: 26 July 2013

Originally posted by: eclipse

Where are you based?


I'm based in Stockport.
 27 July 2013 02:38 PM
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Whitmore

Posts: 14
Joined: 26 July 2013

Originally posted by: Zs

Welcome Simon,



In fact, welcome to our minefield.



My favourite reference manual is 'electrical installation work' by Brian Scaddan. I used the first three or four chapters constantly in the early days and I like his plain English explanations. I still use it. It is important to pick up an understanding of the science as early as you can. I fell down quite badly on this and after about three years I realised that pretending to understand just because I could reel off the formulae and some regulations by rote was holding me back.



So, I took the back off it all and went right back to the beginning in private time. Have come to love the right angled triangle and magnetism. A kind of magic.



so, for starters I recommend some maths study. Pythagoras. You need the basics (square of the hypotenuse is equal to........) and an understanding of the sines cosines and tangents and how they relate to the rest of it. You will need it all but for now though, ignore the sines cosines and tangents and just get the basic formula ingrained. Learn what happens if one side changes size, what it does to the other sides, what happens if you know that you cannot change the slanty side or the right angle but the short side is changing....you'll love it and it will help enormously.



Whenever possible, I recommend that you see all of the aspects of your on-paper learning in practice right from the beginning. If you see what is causing an electrical fault, take a photo of it and get your head around the physics of it as soon as you can. It'll have something to do with that triangle. I'm not sure if it is too early for you to be dabbling with faults but I spend quite a bit of time replicating the ones I come across on a dummy circuit. What, why, why again, how, how to fix, what happens if I do this to it and more of the why? Maybe not yet though.



Otherwise, you've come to the right place.



good luck,



Zs


Thanks that's really helpful.
I'm negotiating with a friend who works in the industry so that I can shadow him on my days off. The only good thing I'm finding is that I get days off in the week when most formal people work.
Hoping to get a lot out of the practical side of the work.
 27 July 2013 02:43 PM
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Whitmore

Posts: 14
Joined: 26 July 2013

Originally posted by: zeeper

Get yourself the



IET "on site guide".



The IET "guidance note" books for the BS7671 are very good.



and obviously BS7671 2008 amended 2011(amendment 1)



Your also need knowledge of "The electricity at work regulations 1989"


I already have the on site guide and BS 7671. Although finding them difficult to make sense of at present. I will get there though.
Some of the references that my course advises to look up aren't actually in the places where they say they are which makes completing the revision and assignments difficult at times.
I'm only just starting out so I know there is a long journey ahead.
 27 July 2013 04:06 PM
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eclipse

Posts: 151
Joined: 03 November 2006

Well good luck with your aspirations, I'm sure you can get plenty of advice from this forum when you need it, it's a long slog and you never stop learning, I've been in this industry for nearly forty years and and although now office based am constantly learning and updating skills as technology rapidly changes.
Good luck to you!!

-------------------------
Thanks

Alan.

Now what was that reg no?
 27 July 2013 07:08 PM
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zeeper

Posts: 1411
Joined: 11 July 2008

Dont be worried about asking basic or daft questions on here. I do it all the time, and I've learnt a lot just from this forum..
 27 July 2013 08:28 PM
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antric2

Posts: 1068
Joined: 20 October 2006

Hello Whitmore and welcome to the ' pleasure dome of electrics'.
Most advice is sought and answered on this forumn as there is a wealth of helpfull and very experienced people here.
Already, there has been good advice given and my additional pennies worth is to advise on getting the Part P Doctor as it is a superb referrence book written by someone who has done the job for years and writes in laymen terms, a great book.

Make yourself a test board at home so you can practice circuits and get fluent in testing.Just make the supply to your board a 13A plug.
I am in Whitefield, not far from you, and work is very competitive round here but keep going and trying and eventually you will make a living.
What is OLCi ?
Regards
Antric
 28 July 2013 10:09 AM
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John Peckham

Posts: 7509
Joined: 23 April 2005

Whitmore

It is no doubt very confusing at the start but everyone has to start somewhere. So how do you eat an elephant a bit at a time. Definitely use your days off working with that friend, there is no substitute for seeing how the work is done on site. I would recommend the Part P Doctor as a good book for new sparks. It is very well illustrated, has very practical guidance and is written by a practicing electrical rather than a text book writer.

Have a look on Ebay and Amazon for books you may pick up a bargain.

-------------------------
John Peckham

http://www.astutetechnicalservices.co.uk/
 28 July 2013 07:49 PM
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Whitmore

Posts: 14
Joined: 26 July 2013

Originally posted by: antric2

Make yourself a test board at home so you can practice circuits and get fluent in testing.Just make the supply to your board a 13A plug.

I am in Whitefield, not far from you, and work is very competitive round here but keep going and trying and eventually you will make a living.

What is OLCi ?

Regards

Antric


Im already in the process of making a test board in the garage. just need to get a few bits to go on it.
OLCI is the company which are supplying me with all the training materials and practical training sessions etc
 28 July 2013 08:19 PM
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Martynduerden

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Joined: 13 July 2008

Welcome to the Forum Whitmore,


You are a brave person giving up a career/employment to retrain in something you don't know, Best of luck.

when I trained I was a youngster fresh from hell (AKA School) I found learning relatively easy back then. some have mentioned Brian Scadden, Great books.

Also look at the AEEU Books - now they were amazing books in my days at college.

I don't have any financial interest in TTS.

As for OLCI you will find it synonymous with FDW on the internet and in the trade - I don't know them and have no grudge there. just don't spend to much money on fast track courses ultimately they just are not worth the cost.

-------------------------
Regards

Martyn.

Only a mediocre person is always at their best



www.electrical contractors uk.com
 29 July 2013 12:02 PM
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tomgunn

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Welcome Whitmore...

The thing is... if you stand too close to anything it can seem daunting... if you take a step back and make a cuppa tea and look at the problem... you'll find that its all quite simple really... if you think of the electrics as a flow and return of water... you'll get the idea.

If you can run a cable for a light point then you can run 10. the thing is... dont run before you can walk... house wirings very easy... then you have the heating controls to worry about but they come with a diagramme... then on to commercial and then, maybe sometime later down the road, industrial.. keep safe and good luck!

I shouldnt really say this... if you want an easy life... become a train driver... if you dont then carry on.

Tom

-------------------------
Tom .... ( The TERMINATOR ).

handyTRADESMAN ... haha

Castle Builders

Why did Nick Clegg cross the road? Because he said he wouldn't!

I can resist anything..... except temptation! ( Karl Gunn ).
 29 July 2013 12:10 PM
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marclambert

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"I shouldnt really say this... if you want an easy life... become a train driver... if you dont then carry on."

Isn't that just a bit bad taste right now Tom?
regards
Marc
 30 July 2013 09:01 AM
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tomgunn

Posts: 3246
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Originally posted by: marclambert

"I shouldnt really say this... if you want an easy life... become a train driver... if you dont then carry on."



Isn't that just a bit bad taste right now Tom?

regards

Marc


NO.... it wasnt meant that way... I didnt even think about whats been happening!! Cant even post something without getting a telling off... I have been doing a lot of work at my sons house and his neighbours a train driver... what an easy life that is... so sorry.... nothing was meant by saying that whatsoever!!!!

I reckon that most works in life have trouble.... coach drivers, train drivers, pilots... so I will just say... if you want an easy life... then become a bus driver... dont think that that will upset anyone will it? Jesus wept...!!!!!!!

Tom

-------------------------
Tom .... ( The TERMINATOR ).

handyTRADESMAN ... haha

Castle Builders

Why did Nick Clegg cross the road? Because he said he wouldn't!

I can resist anything..... except temptation! ( Karl Gunn ).
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