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Topic Title: Choice of routing.
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Created On: 04 July 2013 08:49 PM
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 04 July 2013 08:49 PM
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MrOther

Posts: 531
Joined: 08 June 2010

Hi all,

In my parents living room I'm extending/altering a lot of subcircuits (see other posts/threads.)

Without consultation my Dad has booked in the carpenter to come round Monday to erect skirting and wooden panelling to the living room, the exactitude of the measurements of which haven't been determined because in some places they have will have to be made to measure.

For the sockets not to sit between panels or on the features (curves and what not) I'll probably also have to resituate and extend existing sockets as well as install new ones. So I'm looking at taking a holiday or sickie to be at home to work on the house and react as needed.

The floor is parkay and so I can't access under the floor. So all cables have to be thrown in the wall.

What I want to ask people is preference:

Do I run the cables in the safe zones between sockets (horizontal) or would it be better to chase the wall out where the wall meets the parkay and fold the cable back into the recess where parkey stops.

I know this sounds like a little thing, but you lot always throw out such good advice and thoughts on possible practical as well regulatory issues I thought I'd ask.

The difference to me in both methods is time and mess on the day...
 04 July 2013 09:05 PM
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daveparry1

Posts: 6239
Joined: 04 July 2007

Best to run the cables horizontally between sockets. If you chase down to floor level and then run the cables across either in the floor or the wall they'll be outside the permitted zones,

Dave.
 09 July 2013 08:15 PM
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MrOther

Posts: 531
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UPDATE:

So we're having panelling put on the walls of the living room, plus new skirting. Not like, but unlike this:

http://thewallpanellingcompany.co.uk/heritage.html

Depending on the design of actual pattern on the panels, existing as well as new sockets and accessories will need jointing and moving to make it look right (i.e. sockets not sitting between wooden patterns or features and not sitting between panels, ideally centralised.)

My problem is this: Parkey floor and no accessibility to under the floorboards, so all cables will be joint via lugs and heat shrink. Place in the wall and plastered over.

However, depending on where the panels turn up, it may be possible that sockets may move over quite considerably (I'm think worse case scenario here.) So let's say two feet across. This will mean the cables will go diagonally across the wall - big no, no.

So what I'm suggesting is place a bit of steel conduit over where cable comes out of parkay flooring, and as low as possible, run horizontally along the floor, then up the wall into the back box. Obviously, conduit won't be reused to rewire at later dates because conduit won't breach the floor and the end will be lost in the wall, it is merely be used here as earthed mechanical protection.

I could then plaster (if family wants, they'll probably just want to put the bloody wood over the top) over and make good. Then put on wooden panel.

RCD Sockets.

On top of all this, by the time wooden panels are put on, the cable could be about 30mm-ish back into the wall. Depending on thickness of layer of lime plaster to brick work and the thickness of the panelling.

Thoughts and advice please on these suggestions please.

Many thanks for your time as always and I hope you are all well.
 10 July 2013 02:58 PM
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AJJewsbury

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Joined: 13 August 2003

This kind of thing is much easier when you can see it (at least that's my excuse for the following thoughts, which might be entirely impractical in the circumstances!)

Can the cable under the parquet(?) floor be abandoned and, for instance, come through the wall from a socket in another room for the start/end of the run? Cables just then run horizontally around the room at socket height, if needs be use BS 8436 cable for any bits of wall that don't have visible accessories on them to create a zone.

I'm not sure about crimps & heatshrink if the joint isn't necessarily then going to be surrounded by incombustible material - e.g. might not be plastered over - would be better in a box, even if it's not accessible (OK if crimped).

Or if you do have to use the existing cable up from the floor, how about: if the first/last socket in the run needs to be moved, then keep the back box and protect the cable up from the floor with a straight bit of steel conduit, bushed into the box to earth it. The box is then in a safe zone as it'll be horizontal from the new socket position. Make your crimps inside the old box, run horizontally to the new socket position and cover the box with a blanking plate - that'll then be hidden by the panelling.

Not the neatest job ever, but I think it should comply.

(BTW I don't think that running the cable in the gap around the parquet edge would be 'out of zones' as it's below the finished floor surface, so arguably part of the floor rather than wall, so zones don't apply. But that gap is there to allow the timber to expand/contract (which is can do by a surprising amount), so I wouldn't suggest running a cable there either.)

- Andy.
 10 July 2013 07:31 PM
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MrOther

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Thanks again.

For two or three sockets it would be a case joint and moving up or down or left or right - so conduit would have to be used depending on circumstance.

For one new socket the cable was going to be run in horizontally in zone with T/E - because that's what I have in the shed might have some flex if I'm lucky

Can't come off other rooms because these have been finished at other times over the last two years (I did ask my parents for some forward planning but my Dad said if he believed in that I wouldn't be around - I joke ).
 10 July 2013 07:35 PM
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MrOther

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I think I'll have to do as I suggested, making allowances that all joints must be plastered in if exposed and that conduit should be above floor level to avoid expanding wood.

I think this one of those situation when common sense (when is anyone going to drill within an inch of the floor?) plus trying your best to comply (out of zone so it's in steel conduit and it is RCD protected) equates to just remembering that BS7671 is just guidance.
 10 July 2013 08:15 PM
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daveparry1

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when is anyone going to drill within an inch of the floor?

When fixing a skirting board maybe?
 10 July 2013 09:08 PM
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MrOther

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Glue/mastic/etc on or stapled on. Even so, que on steel conduit.
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